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Carroll Community College

NEWS
April 30, 1993
CCC is host of conferenceMore than 100 members of the Maryland Association of Higher Education will attend a spring conference at Carroll Community College today.The association includes faculty and staff from all the two- and four-year colleges and universities in the state, both public and private.Members hold a fall meeting in Baltimore every year and move the spring conference around to different schools.Carroll Community College Executive Dean Joseph F. Shields and another Carroll staff member will be honored at the conference today.
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NEWS
November 9, 1992
CCC appoints faculty memberCarroll Community College recently announced the appointment of Gwen Myers to the faculty. She will teach courses in growth and development in early childhood education and general psychology and human development.A native of Lottie, Ala., she received a bachelor's degree in child development and a master's degree in early childhood education from Auburn University. She earned her doctorate at the University of Texas.She lives in Catonsville with her husband, Scott, and two children, Nicholas, 9, and Olivia, 6.Teachers honored for drug abuse classSome 115 public school teachers, counselors and health assistants participated in Carroll Community College's 30-hour training program at the Institute for Drug and Alcohol Abuse Education over the summer.
NEWS
November 1, 1993
TROY MEYERS, 20, son of George and Margaret Meyers of Bertie Avenue in Westminster.School: Sophomore at Carroll Community College; 1991 graduate of Westminster High School.Honored for: Being appointed by college President Joseph Shields as the college's first representative to the Student Advisory Council of the Maryland Higher Education Commission.The council includes one representative from each college and university in the state.Carroll Community College was not represented before because was a branch campus of Catonsville Community College until it gained independence in July.
NEWS
April 21, 1993
Come July 1, Carroll Community College will be an independent institution. While this may appear to be nothing more than a mere administrative change, independence also means for CCC a more secure financial future and more control over its curriculum and operations.Carroll's only public institution of higher education has operated as an appendage of Catonsville Community College since its inception in 1977. As a branch of the Baltimore County system, Carroll matured into an institution of stature with about 2,000 students.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1998
Carroll Community College and the Maryland National Guard entered into an agreement last night to cut tuition in half for guardsmen who attend the school.College and Guard officials said it was the beginning of a partnership that will combine the resources of the two institutions."By developing these partnerships with colleges, there's a lot of things we can do besides the tuition waiver," said Lt. Col. Milton P. Davis, an education officer with the Maryland National Guard."We can develop our armories as community centers and use them for classrooms for colleges to have off-campus locations," Davis said.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | April 16, 1993
Amid non-alcoholic champagne toasts, fresh fruit and the congratulations of faculty, staff and advisory board members, officials of Carroll Community College equated the college's new autonomy yesterday with several historical fights for liberation."
NEWS
December 24, 2000
Business institute offers seminars for women The Women's Business Institute is offering a number of educational programs and classes. Entrepreneur Workshop: from 7 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. Jan. 10 at Carroll Community College. Local business owners will tell how they got started. Women's Business Roundtable: a mentoring and support program for female business owners, from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Jan. 17 at Carroll Community College in Westminster. Pam Wilson from the institute will discuss "The Male Mind at Work."
NEWS
November 6, 2005
Carroll Community College offers classes for anyone who wants to start their own business. Classes offer help from financing, marketing and business plans to legal considerations and valuable resource information. Courses being offered this fall include: Keys to Starting a Successful Home-Based Business: 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday; $65, and $40 for seniors. Starting a Pet Sitting Business: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 3; $65, and $40 for seniors. Legal Issues Facing Small Business Owners: 6:30 p.m. to 9:45 p.m. Wednesdays, Dec. 1 to 15, Entrepreneur Factory, Sykesville; $79, and $35 for seniors.
NEWS
By Kevin Dayhoff | February 12, 2014
The economy, jobs creation, and unemployment continue to be in the national and state news these days. Locally, the business and economic climate has changed in the last few years. To be certain, change has been a constant dynamic in the local economy since the beginnings of our county in the 1700s. The one thing that has remained the same in spite of all the changes, is that agriculture continues to be a major industry in Carroll. But one agricultural product many younger readers may not be familiar with that has not withstood the test of time is an ancient medicine known for its distinctive, unpleasant smell - wormseed.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2000
As part of its effort to open doors to four-year schools, Carroll Community College has partnered with Shippensburg University in south-central Pennsylvania to streamline the transfer process and prevent students from losing time or duplicating courses. Last week's agreement with Shippensburg is the latest in a series of transfer agreements signed by the two-year college in Westminster. The school has similar arrangements with Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa., Johns Hopkins Hospital Schools of Medical Imaging, University of Maryland University College as well as all public colleges and universities in Maryland.
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