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By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 4, 1992
Q: I have a deck built of pressure-treated lumber that absorbs rainwater like a blotter. What kind of product do you recommend to seal it? I am told that some sealers do more harm than good?A: Some owners of pressure-treated structures assume the wood needs no protective treatment, and this view at one time was encouraged by manufacturers of the wood.However, most pressure-treated wood should have periodic sealing against moisture, preferably every year or so. Although the wood is resistant to rot and insect attacks because of the pressure treatment, it can warp, split and develop mildew if not protected from the effects of water.
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By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2010
Question: I saw an ad that said I should get rid of "wood" ants in my yard. What does the University recommend about outside ants? Answer: You want to have ants in your yard. They kill termites and eat many other pests, e.g. Japanese beetle eggs. Their foraging cleans up the constant plant debris created in a landscape. Their soil tunnels aerate the soil, helping plant roots get the oxygen they must have to survive. Their tunneling also moves nutrients deep in the soil up to where roots can use them.
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By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2010
Question: I saw an ad that said I should get rid of "wood" ants in my yard. What does the University recommend about outside ants? Answer: You want to have ants in your yard. They kill termites and eat many other pests, e.g. Japanese beetle eggs. Their foraging cleans up the constant plant debris created in a landscape. Their soil tunnels aerate the soil, helping plant roots get the oxygen they must have to survive. Their tunneling also moves nutrients deep in the soil up to where roots can use them.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld & Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld & Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | June 20, 2004
My eggplants' new leaves are being eaten by flea beetles. What is the best organic control method? Spray with a botanical insecticide, like neem or pyrethrum, or dust with diatomaceous earth. A dusting of screened wood ash will disrupt feeding, though it must be reapplied after rain. Another good organic method is to use a floating row cover when plants are first put in the ground, then remove when the flowers form. Healthy mature plants can sustain a good bit of flea beetle damage and still produce a fair crop.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | July 14, 2002
Can a house become infested with carpenter ants and termites within two years? That is what Kenneth Newburger of Pikesville wants to know after a pest control inspector recently found both types of wood boring insects in his 21-year-old house. Two years ago, when he bought the house, an inspection by a different pest control company found no evidence of infestation. Now he's faced with the cost of termite treatment and would like to know if he has any recourse against the first company that inspected the house.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld & Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld & Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | June 20, 2004
My eggplants' new leaves are being eaten by flea beetles. What is the best organic control method? Spray with a botanical insecticide, like neem or pyrethrum, or dust with diatomaceous earth. A dusting of screened wood ash will disrupt feeding, though it must be reapplied after rain. Another good organic method is to use a floating row cover when plants are first put in the ground, then remove when the flowers form. Healthy mature plants can sustain a good bit of flea beetle damage and still produce a fair crop.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | August 17, 1997
IF YOU live in a house that's more than 50 years old, you can pretty much bet its builder never envisioned air conditioning. Thus you may discover, as Karol did in her 85-year-old bungalow, that there's no way to retrofit central air conditioning without ruining some charming architectural feature.But, you should also discover, the builders did think of some ways to keep the house cooler in hot weather. You just have to help the house take advantage of them. Here are some suggestions for weathering the heat:Don't let the heat build up in the first place.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1999
Parents of schoolchildren will be learning quite a bit about bugs this year. And rodents. And weeds.A state law that will take effect this fall -- it was enacted last year after an intense lobbying effort by parents -- requires all elementary schools to notify parents by letter whenever a pesticide is to be used in a building. Many systems are voluntarily implementing the procedure in middle and high schools as well.Pests are no new problem in Maryland schools.Last year alone, an army of carpenter ants attacked a portable classroom at Spring Garden Elementary in Hampstead.
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By Kevin Cowherd | June 1, 2000
THE DAY WAS going along swimmingly until I spotted a couple of carpenter ants scurrying across the kitchen floor. This I recognized as a bad sign. But even as I squashed them dead with a manly stomp of a loafer, my thinking was: I did not see you. You're not there. You don't exist. See, for me, it has always been so much easier to live in denial. You're not there. I don't see you. This works with bills, bad report cards, oil stains that suddenly appear under a car in the driveway. The next day, though, another a half-dozen ants appeared on the kitchen floor.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | April 20, 1991
Spring is busting out all over. My yard shows all of the symptoms.The lawn is awash in a rainbow of colors, from golden dandelions to purple-flowering ground ivy. Motorists stop to gawk. I presume they are envious.All over the yard, the wildlife is stirring. Suddenly, there are fresh mole hills in the lawn and carpenter ants streaming into the tool shed. (I believe the "carpenter" ants have come to construct a new wing on the shed. But my wife is skeptical and suggests we check it out.)Recently, I awoke at dawn to find the flower bed overrun by a roaming band of wild chickens terrorizing the countryside.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | August 11, 2003
CARPENTER ANTS have munched through the brick (or mortar) of our solarium and now are bustling en masse around it. Chipmunks lounge in our bird feeder and deer have plundered my garden. It is a summer when, more than usual, the varmints are repeatedly attacking, and winning. Inexplicably, the rabbits, which are plentiful and some nearly as big as cocker spaniels, have almost left the garden alone, so far. I live less than 100 yards north of Baltimore City, yet deer have chomped my day lillies, Plantagenet hostas (the fragrant white ones)
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | July 14, 2002
Can a house become infested with carpenter ants and termites within two years? That is what Kenneth Newburger of Pikesville wants to know after a pest control inspector recently found both types of wood boring insects in his 21-year-old house. Two years ago, when he bought the house, an inspection by a different pest control company found no evidence of infestation. Now he's faced with the cost of termite treatment and would like to know if he has any recourse against the first company that inspected the house.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 1, 2000
THE DAY WAS going along swimmingly until I spotted a couple of carpenter ants scurrying across the kitchen floor. This I recognized as a bad sign. But even as I squashed them dead with a manly stomp of a loafer, my thinking was: I did not see you. You're not there. You don't exist. See, for me, it has always been so much easier to live in denial. You're not there. I don't see you. This works with bills, bad report cards, oil stains that suddenly appear under a car in the driveway. The next day, though, another a half-dozen ants appeared on the kitchen floor.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1999
Parents of schoolchildren will be learning quite a bit about bugs this year. And rodents. And weeds.A state law that will take effect this fall -- it was enacted last year after an intense lobbying effort by parents -- requires all elementary schools to notify parents by letter whenever a pesticide is to be used in a building. Many systems are voluntarily implementing the procedure in middle and high schools as well.Pests are no new problem in Maryland schools.Last year alone, an army of carpenter ants attacked a portable classroom at Spring Garden Elementary in Hampstead.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | August 17, 1997
IF YOU live in a house that's more than 50 years old, you can pretty much bet its builder never envisioned air conditioning. Thus you may discover, as Karol did in her 85-year-old bungalow, that there's no way to retrofit central air conditioning without ruining some charming architectural feature.But, you should also discover, the builders did think of some ways to keep the house cooler in hot weather. You just have to help the house take advantage of them. Here are some suggestions for weathering the heat:Don't let the heat build up in the first place.
FEATURES
By Rick Horowitz | September 11, 1994
I figure the candy basket was the last straw. When the ant came marching out of the candy basket, we knew we had ourselves a situation. Ants in your pants is one thing; ants on your floors and your walls and your counters is something else again. Big ants. Bold ants. Ants with attitude. And more of them all the time.Which is how we've lately come under the spell of: the Antman.The Antman is sitting at the kitchen table, explaining it all. He's already toured the house, poking into corners, shining his flashlight into the dark places.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | August 11, 2003
CARPENTER ANTS have munched through the brick (or mortar) of our solarium and now are bustling en masse around it. Chipmunks lounge in our bird feeder and deer have plundered my garden. It is a summer when, more than usual, the varmints are repeatedly attacking, and winning. Inexplicably, the rabbits, which are plentiful and some nearly as big as cocker spaniels, have almost left the garden alone, so far. I live less than 100 yards north of Baltimore City, yet deer have chomped my day lillies, Plantagenet hostas (the fragrant white ones)
FEATURES
By Rick Horowitz | September 11, 1994
I figure the candy basket was the last straw. When the ant came marching out of the candy basket, we knew we had ourselves a situation. Ants in your pants is one thing; ants on your floors and your walls and your counters is something else again. Big ants. Bold ants. Ants with attitude. And more of them all the time.Which is how we've lately come under the spell of: the Antman.The Antman is sitting at the kitchen table, explaining it all. He's already toured the house, poking into corners, shining his flashlight into the dark places.
FEATURES
By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 4, 1992
Q: I have a deck built of pressure-treated lumber that absorbs rainwater like a blotter. What kind of product do you recommend to seal it? I am told that some sealers do more harm than good?A: Some owners of pressure-treated structures assume the wood needs no protective treatment, and this view at one time was encouraged by manufacturers of the wood.However, most pressure-treated wood should have periodic sealing against moisture, preferably every year or so. Although the wood is resistant to rot and insect attacks because of the pressure treatment, it can warp, split and develop mildew if not protected from the effects of water.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | April 20, 1991
Spring is busting out all over. My yard shows all of the symptoms.The lawn is awash in a rainbow of colors, from golden dandelions to purple-flowering ground ivy. Motorists stop to gawk. I presume they are envious.All over the yard, the wildlife is stirring. Suddenly, there are fresh mole hills in the lawn and carpenter ants streaming into the tool shed. (I believe the "carpenter" ants have come to construct a new wing on the shed. But my wife is skeptical and suggests we check it out.)Recently, I awoke at dawn to find the flower bed overrun by a roaming band of wild chickens terrorizing the countryside.
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