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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | November 8, 1999
It was not entirely clear from your review of the Microsoft Intellimouse Explorer whether it would be an improvement for people suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome. Would an Intellimouse be easier on the wrists and fingers than a regular mouse?When asking me for medical advice, keep in mind that while I am more than eager to offer it, I am even less than a quack; I am a newspaper reporter posing as something I am not.That said, I believe this slick new laser-light-driven pointing device may be a boon to the hordes of computer users who have been injured by repeating the same motions over and over.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | November 8, 1999
It was not entirely clear from your review of the Microsoft Intellimouse Explorer whether it would be an improvement for people suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome. Would an Intellimouse be easier on the wrists and fingers than a regular mouse?When asking me for medical advice, keep in mind that while I am more than eager to offer it, I am even less than a quack; I am a newspaper reporter posing as something I am not.That said, I believe this slick new laser-light-driven pointing device may be a boon to the hordes of computer users who have been injured by repeating the same motions over and over.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Enright and Michael Enright,Special to The Sun | December 24, 1990
Of the myriad occupational diseases and ailments found in the modern workplace, perhaps none has received as much attention in the last decade as carpal tunnel syndrome, a painful swelling of the tendons and nerves in the hand and wrist.The media has depicted the ailment as an unfortunate product of the Information Age, where computer keyboards and other repetitive workplace tasks force workers' wrists and hands into the same awkward motions hundreds or thousands of times a day.But Dr. Louis B. Halikman, a Baltimore orthopedist with an interest in industrial orthopedic problems, remembers one baffling case of the syndrome in which he could find nothing in one patient's average workday routine that would explain the ache in his hands and wrists.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 3, 1999
Late last spring, cellist Lynn Harrell began to fear that his career as one of the greatest cellists of the last half-century might be over.The cellist, who performs Tchaikovsky's "Rococo Variations" starting tomorrow with the Baltimore Symphony, decided he needed surgery to remove cartilage in both knees that was, he says, "the consequence of more than 30 years of tennis, jogging and golf."In a post-operative conference, however, Harrell asked his surgeon to take a look at his hands."For a few years I had been feeling a slight numbness in my left hand," Harrell says.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | December 23, 1991
William Ison used to come home from his electrician's job with aching wrists and hands, then wake up in the middle of the night with no feeling in his fingers. When the pain spread to his neck and his once-agile hands turned clumsy, he suspected poor circulation and went to the doctor.By the time Ison was referred to Annapolis hand surgeon Dr. Neill S. Cooper Jr., he'd learned he had carpal tunnel syndrome. The occupational disorder is caused by pressure on a nerve that runs through the wrist and controls sensation in all but the little finger.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 3, 1999
Late last spring, cellist Lynn Harrell began to fear that his career as one of the greatest cellists of the last half-century might be over.The cellist, who performs Tchaikovsky's "Rococo Variations" starting tomorrow with the Baltimore Symphony, decided he needed surgery to remove cartilage in both knees that was, he says, "the consequence of more than 30 years of tennis, jogging and golf."In a post-operative conference, however, Harrell asked his surgeon to take a look at his hands."For a few years I had been feeling a slight numbness in my left hand," Harrell says.
FEATURES
By ARLENE EHRLICH | September 29, 1991
IT HAD TO HAPPEN. AN 11-YEAR-OLD GIRL IS SU-ing the Nintendo company because playing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles gave her carpal tunnel syndrome.That's the kind of page 10 story that most newspaper readers file under "whimsy: insignificant." But it's a symptom of a growing national problem.It's no longer news that carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a potentially crippling disorder of the wrists and hands, affects millions of office and factory workers across the country and leaves product manufacturers, employers and insurers vulnerable to billions of dollars in liability and compensation claims.
NEWS
By Daniel Horgan and Daniel Horgan,States News Service | April 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Rain, snow and gloom of night may not faze postal workers, but repetitive motion injuries are stopping them in their tracks, say postal union representatives.Letter-sorting machines and other devices that require repetitive motions to operate have resulted in record numbers of employees contracting carpal tunnel syndrome, witnesses told a hearing conducted last week by the House subcommittee on postal personnel and modernization.Carpal tunnel syndrome is a painful condition that results from overuse of certain tendons and muscles in the arm and hand.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | November 4, 1991
CHICAGO -- Carpal tunnel syndrome, a wrist-and-hand disorder once associated only with factory workers, today is known as "the malady of the information age."The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that "cumulative trauma disorders," including carpal tunnel syndrome, are the fastest-growing occupational illnesses. In 1990 they made up 52 percent of work-related illnesses in private industry, up from 18 percent in 1980.Some 200,000 Americans each year develop carpal tunnel syndrome from repetitive motion, according to Northwestern Memorial Hospital.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | February 12, 1991
Q: A close friend of mine who seemed perfectly healthy just had a positive exercise stress test. That makes me wonder if I should have one, too. When is it a good idea to have an exercise stress test?A: During an exercise stress test you have a continuous electrocardiogram (EKG) done while walking on a treadmill. The exercise is made progressively more strenuous by gradually increasing the speed and incline of the treadmill. An abnormality in the stress EKG can detect a significant narrowing in your coronary arteries that might not be evident on an EKG taken while at rest.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | December 23, 1991
William Ison used to come home from his electrician's job with aching wrists and hands, then wake up in the middle of the night with no feeling in his fingers. When the pain spread to his neck and his once-agile hands turned clumsy, he suspected poor circulation and went to the doctor.By the time Ison was referred to Annapolis hand surgeon Dr. Neill S. Cooper Jr., he'd learned he had carpal tunnel syndrome. The occupational disorder is caused by pressure on a nerve that runs through the wrist and controls sensation in all but the little finger.
FEATURES
By ARLENE EHRLICH | September 29, 1991
IT HAD TO HAPPEN. AN 11-YEAR-OLD GIRL IS SU-ing the Nintendo company because playing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles gave her carpal tunnel syndrome.That's the kind of page 10 story that most newspaper readers file under "whimsy: insignificant." But it's a symptom of a growing national problem.It's no longer news that carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a potentially crippling disorder of the wrists and hands, affects millions of office and factory workers across the country and leaves product manufacturers, employers and insurers vulnerable to billions of dollars in liability and compensation claims.
BUSINESS
By Michael Enright and Michael Enright,Special to The Sun | December 24, 1990
Of the myriad occupational diseases and ailments found in the modern workplace, perhaps none has received as much attention in the last decade as carpal tunnel syndrome, a painful swelling of the tendons and nerves in the hand and wrist.The media has depicted the ailment as an unfortunate product of the Information Age, where computer keyboards and other repetitive workplace tasks force workers' wrists and hands into the same awkward motions hundreds or thousands of times a day.But Dr. Louis B. Halikman, a Baltimore orthopedist with an interest in industrial orthopedic problems, remembers one baffling case of the syndrome in which he could find nothing in one patient's average workday routine that would explain the ache in his hands and wrists.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1997
No spark: Lack of creativity and innovation among rank-and-file workers is the top skill weakness identified by the Society for Human Resource Management in a survey of 1,700 companies. Employers report that 60 percent of job applicants don't have the skills their companies need, but neither do 43 percent of the workers already on the job.Eyes have it: Those computer terminals atop the desks of the American workplace are causing more problems than carpal tunnel syndrome. Computer eyestrain is surging as more people use computers at work.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Most people have heard of carpal tunnel syndrome, and likely even know someone who suffers from it. Cubital tunnel syndrome is less common but also can cause debilitating symptoms, such as numbness in the ring and little fingers and wasting of muscle in the hand. More men than women suffer from the disorder, which can be caused by repeatedly leaning on your elbow or bending your arm for long periods of time. Dr. Ryan Katz, attending hand surgeon at the Curtis National Hand Center at Union Memorial Hospital, answers questions about its cause and treatment.
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