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Carpal Tunnel

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BUSINESS
By Michael Enright and Michael Enright,Special to The Sun | December 24, 1990
Of the myriad occupational diseases and ailments found in the modern workplace, perhaps none has received as much attention in the last decade as carpal tunnel syndrome, a painful swelling of the tendons and nerves in the hand and wrist.The media has depicted the ailment as an unfortunate product of the Information Age, where computer keyboards and other repetitive workplace tasks force workers' wrists and hands into the same awkward motions hundreds or thousands of times a day.But Dr. Louis B. Halikman, a Baltimore orthopedist with an interest in industrial orthopedic problems, remembers one baffling case of the syndrome in which he could find nothing in one patient's average workday routine that would explain the ache in his hands and wrists.
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FEATURES
March 13, 2008
Food science Soaking fries cuts possible carcinogen A wet tater is a healthy tater, according to British researchers. Rinsing or soaking raw french fries in water before frying may reduce levels of acrylamide in the crunchy product, according to a team led by investigators at Leatherhead Food International, a food and beverage research and consulting company. The study appeared online last week in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. Acrylamide, which is created in small amounts during production of french fries and potato chips, has been linked to cancer in rodents, and some researchers believe it may be carcinogenic to humans as well.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | December 23, 1991
William Ison used to come home from his electrician's job with aching wrists and hands, then wake up in the middle of the night with no feeling in his fingers. When the pain spread to his neck and his once-agile hands turned clumsy, he suspected poor circulation and went to the doctor.By the time Ison was referred to Annapolis hand surgeon Dr. Neill S. Cooper Jr., he'd learned he had carpal tunnel syndrome. The occupational disorder is caused by pressure on a nerve that runs through the wrist and controls sensation in all but the little finger.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH HEUBECK and ELIZABETH HEUBECK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 2006
Initially, Shirley Thrasher dismissed the dull, achy pain that sometimes settled in her thumbs. Then it got worse, sending stabbing sensations through her thumbs and into her elbows, which swelled up with fluid. As the throbbing increased, so did its regularity. Unable to ignore the pain any longer, Thrasher consulted a doctor. She was diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome - a painful condition caused by compression of a nerve that runs from the forearm to the wrist - and inflamed tendons on the outside of the elbow, otherwise known as tennis elbow.
FEATURES
By ARLENE EHRLICH | September 29, 1991
IT HAD TO HAPPEN. AN 11-YEAR-OLD GIRL IS SU-ing the Nintendo company because playing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles gave her carpal tunnel syndrome.That's the kind of page 10 story that most newspaper readers file under "whimsy: insignificant." But it's a symptom of a growing national problem.It's no longer news that carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a potentially crippling disorder of the wrists and hands, affects millions of office and factory workers across the country and leaves product manufacturers, employers and insurers vulnerable to billions of dollars in liability and compensation claims.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 3, 1999
Late last spring, cellist Lynn Harrell began to fear that his career as one of the greatest cellists of the last half-century might be over.The cellist, who performs Tchaikovsky's "Rococo Variations" starting tomorrow with the Baltimore Symphony, decided he needed surgery to remove cartilage in both knees that was, he says, "the consequence of more than 30 years of tennis, jogging and golf."In a post-operative conference, however, Harrell asked his surgeon to take a look at his hands."For a few years I had been feeling a slight numbness in my left hand," Harrell says.
NEWS
By Daniel Horgan and Daniel Horgan,States News Service | April 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Rain, snow and gloom of night may not faze postal workers, but repetitive motion injuries are stopping them in their tracks, say postal union representatives.Letter-sorting machines and other devices that require repetitive motions to operate have resulted in record numbers of employees contracting carpal tunnel syndrome, witnesses told a hearing conducted last week by the House subcommittee on postal personnel and modernization.Carpal tunnel syndrome is a painful condition that results from overuse of certain tendons and muscles in the arm and hand.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | February 12, 1991
Q: A close friend of mine who seemed perfectly healthy just had a positive exercise stress test. That makes me wonder if I should have one, too. When is it a good idea to have an exercise stress test?A: During an exercise stress test you have a continuous electrocardiogram (EKG) done while walking on a treadmill. The exercise is made progressively more strenuous by gradually increasing the speed and incline of the treadmill. An abnormality in the stress EKG can detect a significant narrowing in your coronary arteries that might not be evident on an EKG taken while at rest.
NEWS
By ELISE ARMACOST | March 7, 1993
After one week of trying to make sense out of Janet Guy Purdy's workman's compensation case, I am ready to tear my hair out. How, after nearly six years, Mrs. Purdy has any hair left at all is anybody's guess.Mrs. Purdy is 33, a Harundale native now living in Pasadena with her husband and two kids. Five and a half years ago, she was forced to leave her $210 a week job as a silk screener and embroiderer with Lettering Unlimited, a Glen Burnie firm, after developing carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel is a painful condition affecting the nerves and tendons in the wrist often caused by repetitive hand movements.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | November 4, 1991
CHICAGO -- Carpal tunnel syndrome, a wrist-and-hand disorder once associated only with factory workers, today is known as "the malady of the information age."The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that "cumulative trauma disorders," including carpal tunnel syndrome, are the fastest-growing occupational illnesses. In 1990 they made up 52 percent of work-related illnesses in private industry, up from 18 percent in 1980.Some 200,000 Americans each year develop carpal tunnel syndrome from repetitive motion, according to Northwestern Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2003
I can't do a full push-up. Any suggestions on how to work up to it? Start with either wall push-ups (also known as push-aways) or counter-top push-ups, which are done just as they sound. Be sure to keep your back straight. Do three sets of 10-15 repetitions, twice daily. When your arms are strong enough, you can upgrade to a modified version of the standard push-up. Lying face down with hands beneath your shoulders and your knees on the floor (again, make sure your back is straight), push yourself up as you would with a traditional push-up.
NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 18, 2001
THE GLEN BURNIE chapter of Meals on Wheels could easily be nicknamed "Old Faithful." The volunteers there deliver two square meals a day, every weekday, to dozens of households in the area. More than 200 volunteers bring hot meals for lunch and cold, boxed meals for dinner to the elderly, the disabled and others unable to cook and shop. Some clients need the service only temporarily, said program administrator Nancy Shores. "We have some clients who are just getting out of the hospital who might only need the meals for a week," she said, and others have received the meals for years.
NEWS
By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 17, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to hear two cases that could clear up lingering confusion about how much protection Congress intended to give disabled workers under the Americans with Disabilities Act. In one case, the court will consider whether an assembly-line worker with carpal tunnel syndrome is disabled and thus entitled to a less physically demanding job. In the other case, the court will decide whether a disabled employee who...
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 9, 2000
It used to be that DJ music was just that -- music made using two turntables, a mixer and a box of LPs. These days, though, a DJ in the recording studio will use anything available: samplers, drum machines, keyboards, singers and digital editing software such as ProTools. Not Kid Koala, who arrives in Baltimore this evening as part of the current NinjaTune tour. When he went in to cut his new album, "Carpal Tunnel Syndrome," there were no samplers to make loops with, no ProTools to slice and dice the tracks.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 3, 1999
Late last spring, cellist Lynn Harrell began to fear that his career as one of the greatest cellists of the last half-century might be over.The cellist, who performs Tchaikovsky's "Rococo Variations" starting tomorrow with the Baltimore Symphony, decided he needed surgery to remove cartilage in both knees that was, he says, "the consequence of more than 30 years of tennis, jogging and golf."In a post-operative conference, however, Harrell asked his surgeon to take a look at his hands."For a few years I had been feeling a slight numbness in my left hand," Harrell says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Phillip Robinson and Phillip Robinson,knight ridder/tribune | January 4, 1999
If you spend a lot of time in front of a computer, an ergonomic keyboard can help protect your health.They don't come as standard equipment with any computers I know of, but you can buy one separately for $50 to $200 and easily substitute it for your current keyboard.Ergonomic keyboards have keys that are supposedly easier to type upon. They enlarge frequently used keys such as Enter and Backspace. They position the keys to put them within the natural reach of your fingers, which, after all, aren't all the same length, size, or strength, and which curve in subtly different ways.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2003
I can't do a full push-up. Any suggestions on how to work up to it? Start with either wall push-ups (also known as push-aways) or counter-top push-ups, which are done just as they sound. Be sure to keep your back straight. Do three sets of 10-15 repetitions, twice daily. When your arms are strong enough, you can upgrade to a modified version of the standard push-up. Lying face down with hands beneath your shoulders and your knees on the floor (again, make sure your back is straight), push yourself up as you would with a traditional push-up.
FEATURES
December 1, 1991
A COMPLEX PROBLEMEditor: Arlene Ehrlich's article on carpal tunnel syndrome [Sept. 29] was an excellent review of this far-reaching and complex problem.For patients who require surgery . . . there is a new technology using an internal camera and two 1/4 inch incisions. . . .The first "endoscopic carpal tunnel release" in the Baltimore area was performed earlier this year at St. Agnes Hospital. I am currently teaching other hand surgeons this new technology, which holds promise as a wonderful alternative for most patients considering surgery.
NEWS
April 4, 1995
A 53-year-old county police officer filed a $300,000 suit yesterday in Anne Arundel Circuit Court claiming injuries suffered in a 1992 car wreck left him with carpal tunnel syndrome in both arms.Officer John Intelkofer, of the 500 block of Cyprus Lane, Severna Park, alleges that on April 18, 1992, he had stopped his county police car to make a left turn while heading south on Route 648 at Hollins Ferry Road in Ferndale. A car driven by Randy Coberly of the 1200 block of Thompson Ave. in Severn hit him head-on, the suit says.
FEATURES
January 23, 1994
Getting a grip on carpal tunnel syndromeHere are two new products aimed at preventing carpal tunnel syndrome:Carpal Tunnel Prevention Glove is for cyclists, autoworkers, weight lifters and others who develop wrist injuries from repeated or prolonged gripping movements. It was designed by Dr. Robert Spitzer, a cyclist and neurologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., and the Wayne State University School of Medicine. Unlike gloves with pads across the median nerve -- the part of the wrist most prone to injury from repetitive motions -- this one has a groove over the nerve that directs lTC pressure from gripping outward to parts of the palm that can withstand pressure.
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