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SPORTS
December 9, 2009
Tennessee coach Bruce Pearl says his Volunteers have been letting their opponents set the game tempo a little too much lately. "It's not been as up as I'd like," he said. "The one good thing is we've been able to win games playing slower as well as playing faster." That could change as the schedule gets tougher for the ninth-ranked Vols (6-1). So Pearl wants his players to be more in charge, starting Friday when they face Middle Tennessee State (3-4) on a neutral Nashville Arena court in the Sun Belt Classic.
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NEWS
By James Burdick | April 8, 2013
You do not have to look far to understand why U.S. health care is so expensive and uneven in quality. A recurrent offender advertises walk-in ultrasound testing of blood vessels and whatever other asymptomatic part you may choose to pay for. Worried older folks can feel lucky that it appears that Medicare would reimburse for the tests. But in fact, the whole course of tests and treatments encouraged by these ads will not improve your life expectancy - and could even have some chance of decreasing it. Shouldn't we read these solicitations as symptoms of a very readily eliminated illness that plagues our health care system?
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NEWS
By Jacob Goldstein and Jacob Goldstein,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 7, 2004
Early last year, a doctor told Jack Westervelt the thick artery supplying blood to the left side of his brain was clogged with plaque. The news meant the 69-year-old was at risk for a stroke. So Westervelt, like some 200,000 people each year, had surgery to clear the vessel, which is known as the carotid artery. The surgeon made an incision "from the bottom of my earlobe to the pit of my neck," Westervelt said. "When you get cut that way, it hurts." he said. "It hurt for several months."
SPORTS
December 9, 2009
Tennessee coach Bruce Pearl says his Volunteers have been letting their opponents set the game tempo a little too much lately. "It's not been as up as I'd like," he said. "The one good thing is we've been able to win games playing slower as well as playing faster." That could change as the schedule gets tougher for the ninth-ranked Vols (6-1). So Pearl wants his players to be more in charge, starting Friday when they face Middle Tennessee State (3-4) on a neutral Nashville Arena court in the Sun Belt Classic.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | January 10, 1995
Q: My doctor has recommended surgery to remove an obstruction in an artery in my neck. He tells me that such surgery will lessen the danger of a stroke. I have never had any symptoms suggestive of a stroke and am reluctant to undergo such surgery. How good is the evidence that surgery to neck arteries prevents strokes?A: Much controversy has surrounded the introduction in 1954 of an operation, known as carotid endarterectomy, to reduce the risk of a stroke. In this operation, an opening is made in one of the carotid arteries, the arteries in both sides of the neck that are major suppliers of blood to the brain.
NEWS
By RICHARD IRWIN | November 21, 2005
A man accused of domestic violence fatally stabbed himself yesterday afternoon in Harford County after being shot by a state trooper, police said. Christopher G. Sikalis, 26, of Kingsville, whose wife had obtained a protective order against him Thursday, was armed with a large knife and was walking in the 1700 block of Singer Road in Abingdon about 4:30 p.m. when Tfc. Sean T. Nevin spotted him, said Greg Shipley, a state police spokesman. Nevin ordered Sikalis to drop the knife, then shot him in both legs when the man threatened him with the weapon, Shipley said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 29, 2000
A Baltimore man who robbed and shot a pizza delivery woman in the face on New Year's Day 1999 was sentenced yesterday to 35 years in prison - far short of what state prosecutors were seeking. Despite the urging of Howard County prosecutors and testimony from the victim, Howard County Circuit Court Judge Lenore R. Gelfman ordered the shooter, Naim Quinton Abdul-Muhaimin, 22, to serve about half of the maximum time recommended under Maryland sentencing guidelines. "We're very disappointed," said Deputy State's Attorney I. Matthew Campbell.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | February 12, 2008
The gruesome injury suffered over the weekend by Florida Panthers forward Richard Zednik, whose carotid artery was severed by a teammate's skate in a freak accident during a game in Buffalo, was one more in a long list of reminders of the peril to which athletes are exposed. Zednik's life was saved by surgery at Buffalo General Hospital. In the fall, at another Buffalo hospital, Bills tight end Kevin Everett was the beneficiary of surgery that not only saved his life but also was part of several remarkable medical treatments that helped him recover from a paralyzing injury he suffered while making a tackle against the Denver Broncos on a kickoff.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | May 19, 2006
Stents, long famous for their success in propping open clogged arteries near the heart, are being used in neck arteries in an effort to reduce strokes, and the technique is highly promising. So promising, in fact, that some experts fear that doctors may adopt the procedure - and patients may clamor for it - before there is enough research to support it. With carotid stenting, doctors insert a mesh device into a clogged carotid artery in the neck to keep blood flowing to the brain. The stents can be placed in the carotid arteries without general anesthesia.
NEWS
By James Burdick | April 8, 2013
You do not have to look far to understand why U.S. health care is so expensive and uneven in quality. A recurrent offender advertises walk-in ultrasound testing of blood vessels and whatever other asymptomatic part you may choose to pay for. Worried older folks can feel lucky that it appears that Medicare would reimburse for the tests. But in fact, the whole course of tests and treatments encouraged by these ads will not improve your life expectancy - and could even have some chance of decreasing it. Shouldn't we read these solicitations as symptoms of a very readily eliminated illness that plagues our health care system?
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | February 12, 2008
The gruesome injury suffered over the weekend by Florida Panthers forward Richard Zednik, whose carotid artery was severed by a teammate's skate in a freak accident during a game in Buffalo, was one more in a long list of reminders of the peril to which athletes are exposed. Zednik's life was saved by surgery at Buffalo General Hospital. In the fall, at another Buffalo hospital, Bills tight end Kevin Everett was the beneficiary of surgery that not only saved his life but also was part of several remarkable medical treatments that helped him recover from a paralyzing injury he suffered while making a tackle against the Denver Broncos on a kickoff.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | May 19, 2006
Stents, long famous for their success in propping open clogged arteries near the heart, are being used in neck arteries in an effort to reduce strokes, and the technique is highly promising. So promising, in fact, that some experts fear that doctors may adopt the procedure - and patients may clamor for it - before there is enough research to support it. With carotid stenting, doctors insert a mesh device into a clogged carotid artery in the neck to keep blood flowing to the brain. The stents can be placed in the carotid arteries without general anesthesia.
NEWS
By RICHARD IRWIN | November 21, 2005
A man accused of domestic violence fatally stabbed himself yesterday afternoon in Harford County after being shot by a state trooper, police said. Christopher G. Sikalis, 26, of Kingsville, whose wife had obtained a protective order against him Thursday, was armed with a large knife and was walking in the 1700 block of Singer Road in Abingdon about 4:30 p.m. when Tfc. Sean T. Nevin spotted him, said Greg Shipley, a state police spokesman. Nevin ordered Sikalis to drop the knife, then shot him in both legs when the man threatened him with the weapon, Shipley said.
NEWS
By Jacob Goldstein and Jacob Goldstein,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 7, 2004
Early last year, a doctor told Jack Westervelt the thick artery supplying blood to the left side of his brain was clogged with plaque. The news meant the 69-year-old was at risk for a stroke. So Westervelt, like some 200,000 people each year, had surgery to clear the vessel, which is known as the carotid artery. The surgeon made an incision "from the bottom of my earlobe to the pit of my neck," Westervelt said. "When you get cut that way, it hurts." he said. "It hurt for several months."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 29, 2000
A Baltimore man who robbed and shot a pizza delivery woman in the face on New Year's Day 1999 was sentenced yesterday to 35 years in prison - far short of what state prosecutors were seeking. Despite the urging of Howard County prosecutors and testimony from the victim, Howard County Circuit Court Judge Lenore R. Gelfman ordered the shooter, Naim Quinton Abdul-Muhaimin, 22, to serve about half of the maximum time recommended under Maryland sentencing guidelines. "We're very disappointed," said Deputy State's Attorney I. Matthew Campbell.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | January 10, 1995
Q: My doctor has recommended surgery to remove an obstruction in an artery in my neck. He tells me that such surgery will lessen the danger of a stroke. I have never had any symptoms suggestive of a stroke and am reluctant to undergo such surgery. How good is the evidence that surgery to neck arteries prevents strokes?A: Much controversy has surrounded the introduction in 1954 of an operation, known as carotid endarterectomy, to reduce the risk of a stroke. In this operation, an opening is made in one of the carotid arteries, the arteries in both sides of the neck that are major suppliers of blood to the brain.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 3, 1991
Only a post-mortem study of the brain of Mike Reynolds, 27, a standout defender for the Baltimore Blast, could reveal what actually caused the stroke that killed him Monday, medical experts say.And, that seems unlikely now. According to Drew Forrester, a Blast spokesman, no autopsy will take place at the request of Reynolds' family.But, at least three Baltimore specialists speculated yesterday that the life of the highly regarded player from Toronto probably was snuffed out by an arterial dissection that blocked the flow of blood to his brain.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | September 16, 1994
The vampire's creator, like the vampire, falls victim to certain preconceptions. He should be pale and ethereal. Tall and thin, blinking at the unaccustomed sunlight.But Roderick Anscombe, a psychiatrist who has listened to the anguished confessions of murderers, is a cheerful man with reddish blond hair and a ruddy face. A sunburn, he says, from running five miles on a September afternoon.Running? This is not your average vampire writer, but then "The Secret Life of Lazlo, Count Dracula," is not your average vampire book.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | September 16, 1994
The vampire's creator, like the vampire, falls victim to certain preconceptions. He should be pale and ethereal. Tall and thin, blinking at the unaccustomed sunlight.But Roderick Anscombe, a psychiatrist who has listened to the anguished confessions of murderers, is a cheerful man with reddish blond hair and a ruddy face. A sunburn, he says, from running five miles on a September afternoon.Running? This is not your average vampire writer, but then "The Secret Life of Lazlo, Count Dracula," is not your average vampire book.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 3, 1991
Only a post-mortem study of the brain of Mike Reynolds, 27, a standout defender for the Baltimore Blast, could reveal what actually caused the stroke that killed him Monday, medical experts say.And, that seems unlikely now. According to Drew Forrester, a Blast spokesman, no autopsy will take place at the request of Reynolds' family.But, at least three Baltimore specialists speculated yesterday that the life of the highly regarded player from Toronto probably was snuffed out by an arterial dissection that blocked the flow of blood to his brain.
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