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Carolyn Colvin

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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Carolyn W. Colvin's nomination to lead the Social Security Administration cleared the Senate Finance Committee on Thursday, queuing up a final vote for the Maryland native later this year. The committee voted 22-2 to advance her nomination to head the Woodlawn-based agency, where she has served as acting commissioner since early last year. "Colvin has vast management experience and a steely resolve to complete successfully whatever mission she is assigned," Sen. Ben Cardin, a member of the committee, said in a statement.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Carolyn W. Colvin's nomination to lead the Social Security Administration cleared the Senate Finance Committee on Thursday, queuing up a final vote for the Maryland native later this year. The committee voted 22-2 to advance her nomination to head the Woodlawn-based agency, where she has served as acting commissioner since early last year. "Colvin has vast management experience and a steely resolve to complete successfully whatever mission she is assigned," Sen. Ben Cardin, a member of the committee, said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
— President Barack Obama's nominee to lead the Social Security Administration will face tough questioning from lawmakers during her confirmation — and many of the hardest queries could come from members of her own party. Carolyn W. Colvin, chosen by Obama this month to head the Woodlawn-based agency, has sparked little opposition from seniors groups or Republicans, but a growing number of Democrats are voicing concerns about cuts the agency has made under her watch. More than a hundred House Democrats have signed a letter urging the agency to reconsider some of those reductions.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Criticism of President Barack Obama's nominee to lead the Social Security Administration appeared to evaporate Thursday at a confirmation hearing that featured few questions about controversial service cuts and recent allegations of mismanagement. Carolyn W. Colvin's hearing before the Senate Finance Committee - which took place hours ahead of a scheduled monthlong recess - drew only two Republicans and lasted less than an hour, an indication the Maryland native might face an easier path to the job than initially expected.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
The appointment of Carolyn Colvin as commissioner of Social Security Administration amid questions of cutback actions by Congress is laughable ( "Obama taps Colvin to lead Social Security," June 20). Why can't Congress see that it is the problem, not the solution? They are the ones who have not increased the budget to run the agency and who also allowed attorneys to file disability claim after claim that have put a stranglehold not only on the system but on the benefits paid.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Criticism of President Barack Obama's nominee to lead the Social Security Administration appeared to evaporate Thursday at a confirmation hearing that featured few questions about controversial service cuts and recent allegations of mismanagement. Carolyn W. Colvin's hearing before the Senate Finance Committee - which took place hours ahead of a scheduled monthlong recess - drew only two Republicans and lasted less than an hour, an indication the Maryland native might face an easier path to the job than initially expected.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
Six months after former Social Security Administration commissioner Michael J. Astrue left his post, the Obama administration has yet to nominate a replacement - leaving a leadership gap as the agency wrestles with shrinking budgets and hard choices. Interim leaders at the Woodlawn-based agency, which serves nearly 57 million beneficiaries, are making lasting decisions about whether to close public field offices and furlough employees as they implement $890 million in budget cuts called for under sequestration.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
Carolyn Colvin, the former secretary of the state Department of Human Resources, became acting commissioner of the Woodlawn-based Social Security Administration on Thursday. President Barack Obama has not yet nominated a successor for Michael J. Astrue, the appointee of former President George W. Bush whose six-year term ended last month. Obama's nominee must be confirmed by the Senate. Colvin was deputy commissioner under Astrue and has also served as special assistant to Maryland's secretary of transportation.
NEWS
December 24, 2002
Hilda Simonelli, a retired proofreader, died of heart failure Saturday at Mariner Health of Glen Burnie. The former Southwest Baltimore resident was 94. Before she retired about 30 years ago, she was a proofreader for Baltimore Salesbook Co. on Frederick Avenue. Hilda Caroline Dill was born in Baltimore and raised on Frederick Road, where her parents, Charles and Elizabeth W. Dill, owned a funeral home. She attended city public schools. Mrs. Simonelli wrote poetry and song lyrics. In 1944, she wrote the song "Honeymoon Bay," published by Paragon Music Publishers in New York.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | December 6, 1990
Maryland Department of Human Resources Secretary Carolyn Colvin has dismissed five of her top aides, a spokeswoman for the department confirmed today.A memo is slated to go out tomorrow, announcing that DHR's two deputy secretaries, Richard Stein and Julia Danzy, will be leaving, along with three other DHR officials, spokeswoman Helen Szablya said.Stein and Danzy held the two highest positions in the department, answering directly to Colvin. Stein was planning to retire, Szablya said, but Danzy had joined the department 11 months ago after a long search to fill her newly created position.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
The appointment of Carolyn Colvin as commissioner of Social Security Administration amid questions of cutback actions by Congress is laughable ( "Obama taps Colvin to lead Social Security," June 20). Why can't Congress see that it is the problem, not the solution? They are the ones who have not increased the budget to run the agency and who also allowed attorneys to file disability claim after claim that have put a stranglehold not only on the system but on the benefits paid.
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
— President Barack Obama's nominee to lead the Social Security Administration will face tough questioning from lawmakers during her confirmation — and many of the hardest queries could come from members of her own party. Carolyn W. Colvin, chosen by Obama this month to head the Woodlawn-based agency, has sparked little opposition from seniors groups or Republicans, but a growing number of Democrats are voicing concerns about cuts the agency has made under her watch. More than a hundred House Democrats have signed a letter urging the agency to reconsider some of those reductions.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
Six months after former Social Security Administration commissioner Michael J. Astrue left his post, the Obama administration has yet to nominate a replacement - leaving a leadership gap as the agency wrestles with shrinking budgets and hard choices. Interim leaders at the Woodlawn-based agency, which serves nearly 57 million beneficiaries, are making lasting decisions about whether to close public field offices and furlough employees as they implement $890 million in budget cuts called for under sequestration.
NEWS
March 13, 1991
In announcing a cut in support for the state's poorest and most vulnerable citizens, Human Resources Secretary Carolyn Colvin has done some fancy footwork in placing the blame. The (( cuts are necessary, she says in a letter to welfare clients, because the General Assembly has "refused to raise taxes." That charge, of course, ignores the fact that any tax increase the legislature does enact will affect only next year's budget -- not this year's deficit.Currently, the Human Resources Department anticipates a shortfall of about $9 million, but a reduction in grants beginning in April will save only about $1.7 million.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | October 15, 1993
&TC Carroll County's School to Work program will be presented as a model for the state during the "Maryland's Workforce Strategies for the '90s" conference in Baltimore next week.Diane Massey, head of the county Job Training Partnership Administration, has been invited to speak about the Carroll County program, which guides "at-risk" students through high school and into employment.Ms. Massey, along with Katherine Myers and Gayla Martin of the JTPA office, will also offer what local officials have learned during the four years the School to Work program has been used in Carroll County.
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