Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCarol Burnett
IN THE NEWS

Carol Burnett

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
The middle of the week was so exciting that I forgot all about Midweek Madness, making your favorite blog featurette in all the world a wee bit late. Do forgive. Since Placido Domingto is in the news these days -- he has been at the Met, performing in another of the baritone roles (Germont in 'Traviata') that the famed, 72-year-old tenor has been tackling in his senior years -- I thought you might enjoy this night at the opera from way back in the 1980s. 
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
The middle of the week was so exciting that I forgot all about Midweek Madness, making your favorite blog featurette in all the world a wee bit late. Do forgive. Since Placido Domingto is in the news these days -- he has been at the Met, performing in another of the baritone roles (Germont in 'Traviata') that the famed, 72-year-old tenor has been tackling in his senior years -- I thought you might enjoy this night at the opera from way back in the 1980s. 
Advertisement
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | January 8, 1993
For 11 hilarious years, Carol Burnett kept America in stitches. She shared the title of Queen of Television with the late Lucille Ball, and starred in "The Carol Burnett Show" from 1967 to 1978.Just why her variety series lasted so long is in evidence on CBS Sunday, when "The Carol Burnett Show: A Reunion" is televised (WBAL Channel 13, 9 p.m.)."It was the right time to do it," declared Ms. Burnett, reminding us it's the silver anniversary of the series. "And what's more amazing is we have the whole gang back for the reunion -- Harvey Korman, Tim Conway, Vicki Lawrence and Lyle Waggoner."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | April 2, 2010
Burnett is a splendid storyteller, and she is very generous with her rich recollections from the worlds of TV, stage and film. Here are a few suggestions for questions you might ask her, based on my interview with her. •Ask her about life at the Rehearsal Club, where she and other "young ladies" interested in a life in the theater lived when they were starting out in New York City in the 1950s. •Ask her what she learned from Sid Caesar, the 1950s king of sketch comedy - and Milt Kamen, Caesar's understudy on his landmark "Your Show of Shows" and "Caesar's Hour" TV shows.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 18, 2005
Surely one of the most delightful examples of televised family entertainment this holiday season is Once Upon a Mattress. The delights in this Wonderful World of Disney presentation begin with the casting. Carol Burnett made her Broadway debut as the princess in this musical adaptation of The Princess and the Pea (music by Mary Rodgers, lyrics by Marshall Barer, book by Barer, Jay Thompson and Dean Fuller). Burnett reprised this role twice on TV, in 1964 and 1972. This time, however, she's playing the princess' nemesis, the aptly named Queen Aggravain.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | March 21, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Michael Caine, Carol Burnett, John Ritter, Julie Hagerty, Christopher Reeve, Denholm Elliott and Mark Linn-Baker will star in Hollywood Pictures' film adaptation of "Noises Off," Michael Frayn's stage farce.Director Peter Bogdanovich begins production in early spring, possibly in Santa Barbara, Calif., of the humorous behind-the-scenes tale of a bedraggled British theater company touring the provinces.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 11, 1992
Elizabeth Taylor, whose work in raising funds to help fight AIDS is well known, tonight introduces a two-hour entertainment and informational AIDS special in which show business figures contribute time. "In a New Light," at 8 o'clock on WJZ (Channel 13), includes hosts Linda Lavin, Bruce Davison and Robert Guillaume, with appearances by stars, among many others, Carol Burnett, Dustin Hoffman, Sara Gilbert, Arthur Ashe, Christopher Reeve and Patti Lupone. The show includes documentary elements reporting on the latest medical research into the affliction.
NEWS
November 25, 2006
BETTY COMDEN, 89 Broadway lyrics writer Betty Comden, whose more than 60-year collaboration with Adolph Green produced the classic New York stage musical On the Town, as well as Singin' in the Rain, died of heart failure Thursday in New York City. On Broadway, Miss Comden and Mr. Green worked most successfully with composers Leonard Bernstein, Jule Styne and Cy Coleman. The duo wrote lyrics and often the books for more than a dozen shows, many of them built around such stars as Rosalind Russell, Judy Holliday, Phil Silvers, Carol Burnett and Lauren Bacall.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 20, 1997
If there is one season finale worth going out of your way to see in a week that's wall-to-wall with them, it's "The Birth" on tonight's "Mad About You."I stopped getting excited about television moms having babies about 20 years ago when it started to become a ratings ploy pattern for May "sweeps." So, I sat down to watch this episode armed and dangerously cynical.I walked away a believer -- believing Paul Reiser & Co. might just make this baby thing work. "The Birth" is funny, irreverent and sophisticated, with only one moment of over-the-top schmaltz near the end.It is not the funniest sitcom episode of the year.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 25, 1991
Sharon Gless and Carol Burnett rose yesterday from the ashes of spring pre-emption and outright cancellation, respectively, to find new life on CBS for next fall. "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which disappeared from the CBS schedule this spring, was picked up for the fall. "Carol & Company," which was canceled Monday by NBC, will be reborn on CBS as "The Carol Burnett Show."Other shows renewed from last year were "Northern Exposure," "Evening Shade" and "Top Cops." They'll be joined next fall by new shows starring Redd Foxx, Della Reese and Connie Sellecca.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com and Sun TV Critic | April 2, 2010
Carol Burnett wants to make one thing perfectly clear about her appearance Saturday night at the Lyric Opera House in Baltimore. "I want everybody to know that the show is about questions and answers," she said in a telephone interview last week. "I want to stress that I'm not getting up there and doing sketches or songs or anything like that. I just come out and show a few clips of some of the favorite old questions and answers on our show, and then we just bump up the lights, and for 90 minutes, we wing it."
NEWS
November 25, 2006
BETTY COMDEN, 89 Broadway lyrics writer Betty Comden, whose more than 60-year collaboration with Adolph Green produced the classic New York stage musical On the Town, as well as Singin' in the Rain, died of heart failure Thursday in New York City. On Broadway, Miss Comden and Mr. Green worked most successfully with composers Leonard Bernstein, Jule Styne and Cy Coleman. The duo wrote lyrics and often the books for more than a dozen shows, many of them built around such stars as Rosalind Russell, Judy Holliday, Phil Silvers, Carol Burnett and Lauren Bacall.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 18, 2005
Surely one of the most delightful examples of televised family entertainment this holiday season is Once Upon a Mattress. The delights in this Wonderful World of Disney presentation begin with the casting. Carol Burnett made her Broadway debut as the princess in this musical adaptation of The Princess and the Pea (music by Mary Rodgers, lyrics by Marshall Barer, book by Barer, Jay Thompson and Dean Fuller). Burnett reprised this role twice on TV, in 1964 and 1972. This time, however, she's playing the princess' nemesis, the aptly named Queen Aggravain.
NEWS
November 9, 2002
Stan Burns, 79, an Emmy-winning comedy writer who worked on such television shows as The Steve Allen Show, The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour and The Carol Burnett Show, died Tuesday of heart failure at the Motion Picture and Television Fund retirement home in Los Angeles. Mr. Burns won an Emmy for outstanding writing achievement in variety or music programs for The Carol Burnett Show during the 1971-72 season. His writing career took off in the 1950s, when he contributed to Broadway Open House, the original Tonight Show, starring Steve Allen, and the The Steve Allen Show.
FEATURES
December 6, 2001
Harrison pilgrimage not seen in India Indian officials yesterday played down reports Beatles guitarist George Harrison's ashes were to be immersed in India's holy Ganges River. "I think the whole story is a creation of the media," Varanasi city police Inspector-General Vikram Singh told Reuters. Harrison's last rites have been shrouded in secrecy since a Hare Krishna official said on Monday the musician's family was expected to visit the holy city of Varanasi for the ritual. "As far as the administration is concerned, I don't think there's anything happening because normally any important people would seek official assistance even for a private ritual," Singh said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 20, 1997
If there is one season finale worth going out of your way to see in a week that's wall-to-wall with them, it's "The Birth" on tonight's "Mad About You."I stopped getting excited about television moms having babies about 20 years ago when it started to become a ratings ploy pattern for May "sweeps." So, I sat down to watch this episode armed and dangerously cynical.I walked away a believer -- believing Paul Reiser & Co. might just make this baby thing work. "The Birth" is funny, irreverent and sophisticated, with only one moment of over-the-top schmaltz near the end.It is not the funniest sitcom episode of the year.
NEWS
November 9, 2002
Stan Burns, 79, an Emmy-winning comedy writer who worked on such television shows as The Steve Allen Show, The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour and The Carol Burnett Show, died Tuesday of heart failure at the Motion Picture and Television Fund retirement home in Los Angeles. Mr. Burns won an Emmy for outstanding writing achievement in variety or music programs for The Carol Burnett Show during the 1971-72 season. His writing career took off in the 1950s, when he contributed to Broadway Open House, the original Tonight Show, starring Steve Allen, and the The Steve Allen Show.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 24, 1994
Carol Burnett returns with a new variety special -- lending some variety to an otherwise too-quiet night. During the day, though, two new series premiere that are welcome offerings for pre-school viewers. They're arriving in the Nick of time, as part of the Nick Jr. lineup on Nickelodeon.* "Melrose Place." (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Some of the hospital staffers take a modeling job -- which might mean a temporary relocation to "Models Inc." That spinoff show is in desperate need of some ratings help, so it wouldn't surprise me. Fox.* "Danielle Steel's 'Family Album.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 1996
On the nonfiction side, the show to watch is tonight's continuing saga of "The Great War," which contains the most potent images and segments of the entire series. On the fiction side, the show not to miss is "Mad About You," where Jamie's parents arrive for the first time -- and are played by Carroll O'Connor and Carol Burnett."Roseanne" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)-- Wouldn't it be funny if Ralph and Alice Kramden hit the lottery and got to rub elbows with the upper class? I don't think it would -- at least not based on "Roseanne," which this season, ever since allowing the Conners to strike it rich, has been poor.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.