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NEWS
June 19, 2013
It is bad enough that Carnival Cruise Lines would ask for an exception to the EPA requirement that its ships use cleaner fuel, but to threaten to take its business away from Baltimore is blackmail: The governor should have shown stronger character and not fallen for this ploy ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rules," June 16). This is just another case where states or counties try to influence businesses to come or stay in their jurisdiction because they believe the jobs they offer nullify the sordidness of these nefarious deals.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
When the Carnival Pride returns to Baltimore next spring, it will not only have new pollution-control technology and a $500 million makeover. The ship also will have a new itinerary of extended cruises to the Caribbean. Carnival Cruise Lines, which agreed this year to continue its round-trip service from Baltimore beginning in March 2015, will offer longer sailings to the Caribbean for the first time and a shorter getaway to the Bahamas. Carnival plans to continue its seven-day sailings from Baltimore to the Bahamas and the eastern Caribbean, and will add a number of cruises with special itineraries, including a series of 10- to 14-day trips between Baltimore and San Juan, Puerto Rico, with ports of call that include an exotic array of Caribbean destinations.
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NEWS
July 1, 2013
The real headline on the article regarding Carnival Cruise Lines' decision to leave Baltimore ("Carnival has plans to ship out of port," June 28) should have been: "EPA will cost Maryland and Baltimore jobs. " This is just the beginning for the loss of jobs the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is going to cause. The talk is over. I wonder if the families of the people who will be laid off by Carnival leaving the port will still be believers in climate change. It all sounds good until it hits you in the pocketbook.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
When Carnival Cruise Lines decided to leave Baltimore last summer, saying the port had become too expensive because of environmental regulations, it was with substantial regret. The world's largest cruise line regularly filled its Carnival Pride cruise ship at the port of Baltimore with affluent first-time cruisers who found the Mid-Atlantic jumping-off point convenient. Meanwhile, Maryland saw about $50 million a year in economic value from the ship. After hearing the Pride would be heading to Florida to cut costs, state officials immediately began trying to salvage the relationship.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
As travelers who enjoy a cruise as one kind of lovely vacation, my family is certain now never to cruise with Carnival Cruise Lines - not because the line will move to Tampa, Fla., in 2014, but because of its leadership's sadly narrow perspective on how to preserve their profits at the cost of endangering our seas and coastal areas ("Carnival has plans to ship out of port," June 28). Knowing that Carnival continues to haggle with the EPA over implementing standards to reduce air pollution, it would be unconscionable for an informed traveler to even consider voyaging with Carnival Cruise Lines.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
The Carnival Pride cruise ship will arrive back at the Port of Baltimore on Saturday, a day earlier than scheduled, in an effort to avoid Hurricane Irene. Passengers will begin debarkation from the ship at 7 a.m. Afterwards, the cruise ship will be positioned at an alternate location on the bay as directed by the U.S. Coast Guard, where it will ride out the storm, said Jennifer de la Cruz, a spokesperson for Carnival Cruise Lines. Carnival sails year-round from the Port of Baltimore and another cruise was set to depart on Sunday.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Cruise traffic at the port of Baltimore last year dipped slightly from 2011, snapping a four-year string of increases. Port officials said Wednesday that 240,676 people sailed on 100 cruises out of Baltimore, the second-highest count since year-round service started in 2009. In 2011, 251,889 passengers sailed on 105 cruises, a nearly 20 percent increase over the previous year. Cruise traffic is worth about $90 million in total economic value to the state and is responsible for about 220 jobs.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2002
Carnival became the latest cruise line to sail from Baltimore yesterday, continuing an industrywide push to entice passengers by cutting fares and bringing ships closer to major metropolitan areas. The 960-foot Carnival Legend sailed into port yesterday morning to begin a six-day cruise from Baltimore to Bermuda. The ship, which joined Carnival Cruise Lines' fleet in August, will return twice next year as part of an itinerary that includes a series of voyages to Bermuda from New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 31, 2012
Hurricane Sandy forced Carnival Cruise Lines to cancel just two of its many ocean voyages this week, including a seven-day trip to the Bahamas on the Carnival Pride that was to depart this past Sunday from the port of Baltimore. The cruise line is giving refunds to all passengers, but has decided not to let the 2,124-passenger ship merely sit empty in the Chesapeake Bay. Carnival is now offering a two-day cruise out to sea and back from Friday afternoon to Sunday morning. Rates start at $129 per person for interior rooms, based on double occupancy.
TRAVEL
By Baltimore Sun staff | April 26, 2009
Baltimore's 2009 cruise season sets sail this week as Carnival Cruise Lines makes its debut with a six-day sailing to the Bahamas aboard the Carnival Pride. Carnival is one of four lines that will be sailing from Locust Point Terminal this year. The others are Royal Caribbean, Norwegian and Celebrity - altogether twice as many cruises from Baltimore as last year. Check out our online 2009 Cruise Guide at baltimoresun.com/travel. Here are five things that cruise-goers might want to do in the Bahamas.
NEWS
January 31, 2014
It seems strange to celebrate the return of a ship that hasn't left yet, but that's what the recent announcement that the Carnival Pride will be sailing out of Baltimore beginning in March of 2015 amounts to. Last summer, Carnival Cruise Lines announced the ship would begin sailing out of Tampa, Florida beginning this November, and now, like a reliable snow bird, it's planning a return to Northern climes after just a few months in the Sunshine state....
NEWS
July 3, 2013
As travelers who enjoy a cruise as one kind of lovely vacation, my family is certain now never to cruise with Carnival Cruise Lines - not because the line will move to Tampa, Fla., in 2014, but because of its leadership's sadly narrow perspective on how to preserve their profits at the cost of endangering our seas and coastal areas ("Carnival has plans to ship out of port," June 28). Knowing that Carnival continues to haggle with the EPA over implementing standards to reduce air pollution, it would be unconscionable for an informed traveler to even consider voyaging with Carnival Cruise Lines.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
The real headline on the article regarding Carnival Cruise Lines' decision to leave Baltimore ("Carnival has plans to ship out of port," June 28) should have been: "EPA will cost Maryland and Baltimore jobs. " This is just the beginning for the loss of jobs the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is going to cause. The talk is over. I wonder if the families of the people who will be laid off by Carnival leaving the port will still be believers in climate change. It all sounds good until it hits you in the pocketbook.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
Reaction to the decision by Carnival Cruise Lines to leave the Port of Baltimore next year because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has not agreed to its proposal to use scrubbers, instead of cleaner fuel, to meet air quality requirements breaks down like this: Those who hate government regulation blame the EPA; those suspicious of polluters blame Carnival; and those caught in the middle just want to see jobs restored. Indeed, it's difficult to know who to blame. Has Miami-based Carnival been a good corporate citizen, and is its proposal an honest effort to clean the air?
NEWS
June 19, 2013
It is bad enough that Carnival Cruise Lines would ask for an exception to the EPA requirement that its ships use cleaner fuel, but to threaten to take its business away from Baltimore is blackmail: The governor should have shown stronger character and not fallen for this ploy ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rules," June 16). This is just another case where states or counties try to influence businesses to come or stay in their jurisdiction because they believe the jobs they offer nullify the sordidness of these nefarious deals.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you!" Gov. Martin O'Malley, do you hear these words from the citizens of Maryland or are they just lyrics from a The Hollies 1974 hit song that many of us remember? Have you completely disregarded human life in your quest for higher office? These are my questions to you. After reading the investigation by The Sun's Timothy Wheeler ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rule," June 16), am I to believe that this is how our governor protects the citizens of Maryland?
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2011
Carnival Cruise Lines will continue to offer year-round cruises from the Port of Baltimore through August 2013. The Miami-based cruise line is signing onto an extension of its contract, guaranteeing at least two more years and adding three one-year options. The deal makes it possible for Carnival to continue operating from the port for up to five years. The agreement takes effect on Aug. 31, when the current contract is set to expire. The cruise line began year-round cruises from Baltimore in 2009.
FEATURES
By Susan Hipsley and Susan Hipsley,Special to The Sun | June 4, 1995
Nine years ago, responding to the American trend to take shorter and more frequent vacations, Carnival Cruise Lines offered its first three- and four-day cruises. Today, almost half the passengers booking time on one of the line's 10 ships opt for the mini cruises rather than the seven- or 14-day versions."Ninety-two percent of all vacations are seven days or less," says Bob Dickenson, president of Carnival Cruise Lines, quoting statistics from his company's research.But another survey just released by the Automobile Association of America and the Travel Industry Association shows that while that trend persists, there's a curve in it for those who cruise by car on terra firma.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has interceded with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on behalf of Carnival Cruise Lines after the company threatened to pull its business from Baltimore over a pending air-quality regulation that would require large, ocean-going ships to burn cleaner fuel. O'Malley spoke twice with Bob Perciasepe, acting EPA administrator, since late May to support Carnival's request for what the governor's press secretary called a waiver from the agency's cleaner-fuel mandate.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Cruise traffic at the port of Baltimore last year dipped slightly from 2011, snapping a four-year string of increases. Port officials said Wednesday that 240,676 people sailed on 100 cruises out of Baltimore, the second-highest count since year-round service started in 2009. In 2011, 251,889 passengers sailed on 105 cruises, a nearly 20 percent increase over the previous year. Cruise traffic is worth about $90 million in total economic value to the state and is responsible for about 220 jobs.
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