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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
The good news about the Spring For Music festival at Carnegie Hall is that it chooses American orchestras of all sizes to bring off-the-beaten-path programs to the nation's premier classical music showplace, and charges only $25 a seat. The bad news is that there isn't enough funding to keep the festival going past next spring. The good news is that the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra got to open the penultimate festival Monday night, and do so with considerable flair, delivering a particularly impressive performance of Prokofiev's Symphony No. 4 led by music director Marin Alsop.
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By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Rolando Sanz did a highly important job at Thursday's Orioles playoff opener. That job just didn't involve staying for the whole game. Sanz, an operatic tenor born and raised in Rockville, belted out a raucously well-received national anthem at 5:30 p.m. Later, he dashed to Mount Vernon, where the curtain raised at 8 p.m. for his performance of "Amleto" with the Baltimore Concert Opera. "I've got enough cushion to catch a couple innings," Sanz said before ducking into a back room at Camden Yards to warm up with scales.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
NEW YORK -- Carnegie Hall put out the purple Monday night to welcome the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra for the opening of Spring For Music, a week-long festival showcasing American orchestras playing adventurous programs. Ravens-colored cloths adorned the seat backs of the musicians' chairs and the conductor's podium; more cloths were handed out to audience members to wave on cue in a salute to Baltimore. That cue came before the music started when an announcer from local radio stationĀ  WQXR interviewed the BSO's high-profile booster, Gov. Martin O'Malley, onstage.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | January 16, 2014
Beethoven was such a prolific composer that classical music organizations never run out of material when presenting all-Beethoven programs. Such concerts often focus on specific aspects of that great German composer's output. This certainly will be the case when the Amelia Piano Trio appears for Candlelight Concerts on Saturday, Jan. 25, at 8 p.m., at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. The upcoming concert is billed as Beethoven Complete Piano Trios Concert No. 3. The third and final installment in this Candlelight project, the concert features Beethoven's Trio in E-flat Major, Op. 1, No. 1; Trio in B-flat Major, Op. 11 "Gassenhauer"; and Trio in D Major, Op. 70, No. 1 "Ghost.
NEWS
October 9, 2002
The student: Victoria Zhang, 10 School: Ellicott Mills Middle Special achievement: During the summer, Victoria played piano at Carnegie Hall in a student recital. The audition process involved sending a tape to the Music Teachers Association International headquarters. Schoolchildren are also evaluated based on any music prizes and contests they have won. At the recital, Victoria played Chopin's Impromptu No. 1 in A-flat major. She began playing the instrument at age 6. She also plays clarinet.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 29, 2003
It's an important week for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. On Saturday, the ensemble returns to Carnegie Hall after a two-year absence, bringing with it the daunting challenge of Mahler's Symphony No. 5, which we'll hear first at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall on Thursday and Friday nights. It's the kind of work that can bring out the best -- and worst -- of an orchestra, not to mention a conductor. And since it's a work that has been played on the Carnegie stage by the world's greatest orchestras -- not to mention conductors, again -- the pressure is just a wee bit greater.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | May 19, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Here's another blurring of the line between television and reality, illustrating how TV sometimes exists within its own world in which the rest of us can participate only vicariously.On yesterday's edition of "CBS This Morning" (7 a.m. weekdays, WBAL-Channel 11), a significant segment was devoted to co-host Paula Zahn's pending cello performance with the New York Pops Orchestra last night at Carnegie Hall.We saw tape of her rehearsing with conductor Skitch Henderson (once the bandleader on "The Tonight Show")
FEATURES
By Allan Kozinn and Allan Kozinn,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE $$TC | March 21, 1996
NEW YORK - About 2,000 admirers of the music of Morton Gould filled Carnegie Hall's parquet and the lower two balconies yesterday afternoon to pay tribute to this eclectic composer of symphonic works, Broadway musicals, ballets and film scores.The program, called "A Celebration of Morton Gould," was presented by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, of which Gould had been president for eight years. Gould died Feb. 21 at age 82.Gould's successor, Marilyn Bergman, presided over the tribute, a nearly two-hour program that included performances that touched on the enormous range of styles Gould's music encompassed, as well as recollections by friends and colleagues, and videotape of Gould himself.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | November 19, 1993
It is safe to say that most dream visits to the Big Apple don't include hours of strenuous rehearsal, but the Annapolis Chorale wouldn't have it any other way.Even a mere 48 hours before a Carnegie Hall debut, it's still practice, practice, practice.At 3 p.m. Sunday, 91 members of the chorale will file onto America's most famous stage to perform the radiant Requiem of Gabriel Faure. The singers will be joined by several smaller choirs from Louisiana and Texas and accompanied by the New England Symphonic Ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 4, 2008
If you thought YouTube was just for cheap audio/visual kicks, many of them along the lines of the people-falling-down, pets-going-nutty stuff that turns up on tacky home-video TV shows, think again. This week, an ambitious, very 21st-century project called the YouTube Symphony Orchestra was launched, creating an online community of aspiring musicians. YouTube and parent company Google put together this cyber ensemble, which has no less than eminent conductor Michael Tilson Thomas as artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
The good news about the Spring For Music festival at Carnegie Hall is that it chooses American orchestras of all sizes to bring off-the-beaten-path programs to the nation's premier classical music showplace, and charges only $25 a seat. The bad news is that there isn't enough funding to keep the festival going past next spring. The good news is that the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra got to open the penultimate festival Monday night, and do so with considerable flair, delivering a particularly impressive performance of Prokofiev's Symphony No. 4 led by music director Marin Alsop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
NEW YORK -- Carnegie Hall put out the purple Monday night to welcome the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra for the opening of Spring For Music, a week-long festival showcasing American orchestras playing adventurous programs. Ravens-colored cloths adorned the seat backs of the musicians' chairs and the conductor's podium; more cloths were handed out to audience members to wave on cue in a salute to Baltimore. That cue came before the music started when an announcer from local radio stationĀ  WQXR interviewed the BSO's high-profile booster, Gov. Martin O'Malley, onstage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Barbara Cook approaches a song from the inside out, judging the weight of each measure, the point behind each word in a lyric. So when she sings, she starts from a place where there's nothing but truth. No artifice, no exaggeration, no self-aggrandizing flourish. Small wonder that Cook, who gives a concert at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall this Saturday, a week after turning 85, remains one of the most treasured vocal artists of our time. The years may have shaved some brightness and some top notes from her silvery soprano, but the glow remains as enveloping as ever.
NEWS
By Eileen Pollock | February 16, 2012
I grew up in Baltimore, attended school here, and after graduating Hopkins, moved to New York City. I've spent my adult life working in New York, and I'm thinking of retirement in several years. The excitement and glamour of New York are counterbalanced by the high cost of participating in that excitement and glamour. Then there's the astronomical rents. Rents in Baltimore are retiree-friendly. There's the symphony, art museums and my extended family who live here. I am seriously considering Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
For generations, music students have been getting gold stars, certificates and other pats on the back from their teachers. But a budding musician with high marks in one state is not necessarily on the same level, judged by the same criteria, as a budding musician in another. Such positive reinforcement may soon carry a lot more weight countrywide. Launched by Carnegie Hall in New York and the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, the Achievement Program seeks to establish the first national standard in the United States for measuring musical aptitude in students of all ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Jonathan Biss, the young pianist who makes his Carnegie Hall recital debut on Friday and will repeat the program at the slightly more modest Shriver Hall on Sunday, could easily have become a violinist. But as he tells it on the bio page of his website, "the highlight of his career as a violinist took place when he was a fetus. " A few months before his birth in Indiana in 1980, Biss writes, "he performed, prenatally, the Mozart A major Violin Concerto at Carnegie Hall, with the Cleveland Orchestra under the direction of Lorin Maazel.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | November 23, 1993
"The Music and the Tradition Continue . . ." say the banners that fly over New York City's Carnegie Hall.At 4 p.m. Sunday afternoon, conductor Ernest Green and 91 singers from his Annapolis Chorale took the stage at America's most famous tabernacle of music and officially entered into that tradition.The Chorale's Carnegie appearance occurred under the auspices of MidAmerica Productions, a New York agency that has been booking concerts for the past decade.Mr. Green and his Annapolitans were joined by five high school choruses from Texas and Louisiana in a performance of the radiant "Requiem" of the French composer Gabriel Faure.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | December 28, 1994
To Eric A. Larson, music is "the highest form of communication and the purest."And to an orchestral musician such as Mr. Larson, the ultimate goal is to play at Carnegie Hall in New York City."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
The Ravens aren't Baltimore's only team worth talking about on a Monday morning. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra played an impressive away game (so to speak) Saturday night at Carnegie Hall, scoring extra points with some super-sized Beethoven, and then tackled a gospel version of Handel's "Messiah" Sunday afternoon. The BSO's previous two appearances at Carnegie guaranteed attention. In early 2008, the ensemble gave its first performance there since music director Marin Alsop made history as the first woman to lead a full-time, big-budgeted American orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
Florence Foster Jenkins could most easily have summed up her, um, art, by paraphrasing a line from The Importance of Being Earnest: "I don't sing accurately - anyone can sing accurately - but I sing with wonderful expression." Excruciating expression. Jenkins, whose sold-out recital at Carnegie Hall in 1944 is the stuff of legend, inspired Stephen Temperley's amusing, affectionate, somewhat-overpadded show Souvenir, which opened Thursday at Center Stage with the original stars of the 2005 Broadway production.
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