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NEWS
August 29, 1995
A 21-year-old Hyattsville man was seriously injured when he dived into 2-foot deep water from rocks in Savage Park Sunday, Howard County fire and rescue officials said.Eric Carmona of the 5900 block of Norbrook Road was listed in serious but stable condition at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center yesterday, a hospital spokeswoman said.Mr. Carmona suffered head and spinal cord injuries, said Lt. Ken Byerly, a spokesman for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue.According to rescue officials, Mr. Carmona was with friends at the popular outdoor swim area near the 8600 block of Foundry St. in Savage about 5 p.m. when he made his jump.
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NEWS
April 28, 2009
On April 24, 2009, CAROLYN O. YOUNG CARMONA (nee Jones); beloved wife of Alex Carmona; devoted mother of Elvin Jr. and Robin Young. Also survived by seven grandchildren, her devoted mother Ruth Hall, one brother William Jones, two sisters Martha Williams and Charlene Shird, one daughter-in-law Oray A. Young, a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, other relatives and friends. There will be no viewing of Mrs. Carmona's remains. The family will receive friends at Bethel AME Church, 1300 Druid Hill Avenue, Thursday, 1 P.M. Memorial service will begin 1:30 P.M. Arrangements by CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration, under criticism for its role in the ouster of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, acknowledged yesterday that a senior administration official was in contact with the man who succeeded Chavez on the day he took over. Otto J. Reich, assistant secretary for Western Hemisphere affairs, phoned the incoming president, Pedro Carmona Estanga, to plead with him not to dissolve the National Assembly on the grounds it would be "a stupid thing to do" and provoke an outcry, a State Department official said.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | April 20, 2009
As a doctor, Richard H. Carmona was often dismayed that the first he'd see of a patient with a chronic disease such as diabetes and hypertension was after the often preventable malady had taken its toll. "We have a sick care system, not a health care system," said Carmona, who was U.S. surgeon general from 2002 to 2006. "People only get care after they are sick. I realized when I was a trauma surgeon that most people I cared for had preventable problems, but we never talked about prevention."
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's first surgeon general testified yesterday that his speeches were censored to match administration political positions and that he was prevented from giving the public accurate scientific information on issues such as stem cell research and teen pregnancy prevention. "Anything that doesn't fit into the political appointees' ideological, theological or political agenda is ignored, marginalized or simply buried," said Dr. Richard H. Carmona, surgeon general from 2002 to 2006, to a House committee.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC | April 30, 2007
Wright not sharp Jaret Wright, on the disabled list since April 11 because of right shoulder soreness, returned but didn't look sharp or healthy. He labored from the beginning, walking his first two hitters and making it through just three innings. With his command off and his velocity down, Wright allowed three earned runs on four hits and three walks. He later acknowledged the pain in his shoulder had returned, a development that likely will keep him off the mound for a while. Offense grounded The Orioles were dominated by young right-hander Fausto Carmona, who is expected to be sent to Triple-A later this week with Cliff Lee coming off the DL. Carmona pitched 8 1/3 innings and got 18 of his 25 outs on ground balls.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | April 20, 2009
As a doctor, Richard H. Carmona was often dismayed that the first he'd see of a patient with a chronic disease such as diabetes and hypertension was after the often preventable malady had taken its toll. "We have a sick care system, not a health care system," said Carmona, who was U.S. surgeon general from 2002 to 2006. "People only get care after they are sick. I realized when I was a trauma surgeon that most people I cared for had preventable problems, but we never talked about prevention."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 27, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush moved yesterday to fill two top federal health jobs, nominating a trauma surgeon who is also a sheriff's deputy as surgeon general and Dr. Elias Zerhouni, an administrator at the Johns Hopkins University, to direct the National Institutes of Health. At a White House ceremony with the nominees and their families, Bush praised the two doctors, both of whom spoke of their humble beginnings, as "distinguished physicians who have worked tirelessly to save lives and to improve lives."
NEWS
By Adam Pertman | February 14, 2005
THE U.S. SURGEON General, Richard H. Carmona, has embarked on an admirable quest. Citing the obvious fact that many diseases are inherited, he has created a national campaign that encourages all American families to learn more about their health histories. To make this important task easier to accomplish, Dr. Carmona's office has created software that all of us can download at no cost to help track medical information about our parents, grandparents and other relatives. And to underscore how serious the surgeon general is about getting us all to act, he designated an annual National Family Health History Day to coincide with Thanksgiving.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | July 16, 2007
ATLANTA -- A veteran of combat and police sieges, Dr. Richard H. Carmona thought he knew a dangerous assignment when he saw it. But he didn't know what he was getting into when he signed up to be U.S. surgeon general in the administration of George W. Bush. He entered an unfamiliar, high-risk environment sprinkled with snipers and pockmarked by (political) land mines. As the nation's top doc from 2002 to 2006, Dr. Carmona was ordered not to discuss embryonic stem cell research or the emergency contraceptive known as Plan B, he said last week in testimony before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | July 16, 2007
ATLANTA -- A veteran of combat and police sieges, Dr. Richard H. Carmona thought he knew a dangerous assignment when he saw it. But he didn't know what he was getting into when he signed up to be U.S. surgeon general in the administration of George W. Bush. He entered an unfamiliar, high-risk environment sprinkled with snipers and pockmarked by (political) land mines. As the nation's top doc from 2002 to 2006, Dr. Carmona was ordered not to discuss embryonic stem cell research or the emergency contraceptive known as Plan B, he said last week in testimony before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 15, 2007
Richard Nixon was a crook. He was also a liar and anti-Semite who sought to subvert the Constitution. I wish he was president again. I'd also take Jimmy Carter, widely perceived as being about as effectual as Elmer Fudd, or Bill Clinton, fastest zipper in the West. Flawed men, yes, but say this much for them: When it came to a choice between people and party, between the public and the politics, there was at least a bare chance they would put the people, the public, first. No such chance exists with the current occupant of the mansion on Pennsylvania Avenue.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's first surgeon general testified yesterday that his speeches were censored to match administration political positions and that he was prevented from giving the public accurate scientific information on issues such as stem cell research and teen pregnancy prevention. "Anything that doesn't fit into the political appointees' ideological, theological or political agenda is ignored, marginalized or simply buried," said Dr. Richard H. Carmona, surgeon general from 2002 to 2006, to a House committee.
SPORTS
By STEPHEN WHYNO | May 7, 2007
Burres burns out After striking out the side in the first and taking a lead into the fourth inning, first-time Orioles starter Brian Burres was cruising. Then things turned ugly as Burres allowed three straight singles and a walk with one out. A single by Grady Sizemore drove in another run and Burres was yanked in favor of reliever Kurt Birkins. Jason Michaels ripped Birkins' first pitch for a double, driving in two runs charged to Burres. Burres surrendered five runs on seven hits. Sizemore's saves Sizemore went 2-for-5 with a walk and drove in a run, but he did more damage with his glove, making two highlight-reel catches.
SPORTS
April 29, 2007
Pitches / / His fastball tops at 97 mph and he usually throws it at about 93, 94. His No. 2 pitch is a slider. He's got a version of a splitter, a slider and a [changeup] he mixes in. His fastball explodes and hitters don't hit it. It's not a movement where it tails or cuts; it's a movement all over the place. Weaknesses / / He is either on or he isn't. Clubs hope you can catch him when he isn't throwing strikes. When he doesn't throw strikes you can work the count and get him out of there.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | September 9, 2006
Darnelle Harris felt as if she'd hit a dead end. At the age of 27, she had a high school diploma and had held several jobs in telemarketing and retail sales, but she was barely making ends meet. Prospects for increasing her earnings were grim, she said. Harris has a different outlook today. Armed with new job skills and a professional appearance, Harris says she has several job prospects and is about to return to college to finish her bachelor's degree. Her goal is to work in film production or editing.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR, JOHN FRITZE AND STEPHANIE BEASLEY and JONATHAN BOR, JOHN FRITZE AND STEPHANIE BEASLEY,SUN REPORTERS | June 28, 2006
As states and localities debate smoking bans, U.S. Surgeon General Richard H. Carmona declared yesterday that secondhand smoke triggers diseases that include lung cancer and sudden infant death syndrome -- and that no level is safe. "Science has proven that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke," Carmona said at a Washington news conference, summing up a 709-page report that is the surgeon general's office's first assessment of the risks in two decades. While former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said in 1986 that exposure to other people's tobacco smoke can trigger lung cancer, Carmona added several other diseases.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR, JOHN FRITZE AND STEPHANIE BEASLEY and JONATHAN BOR, JOHN FRITZE AND STEPHANIE BEASLEY,SUN REPORTERS | June 28, 2006
As states and localities debate smoking bans, U.S. Surgeon General Richard H. Carmona declared yesterday that secondhand smoke triggers diseases that include lung cancer and sudden infant death syndrome -- and that no level is safe. "Science has proven that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke," Carmona said at a Washington news conference, summing up a 709-page report that is the surgeon general's office's first assessment of the risks in two decades. While former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said in 1986 that exposure to other people's tobacco smoke can trigger lung cancer, Carmona added several other diseases.
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