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NEWS
June 23, 2005
On June 22, 2005, KEVIN ANDREW CARMODY; devoted father of Joseph Vito Carmody; beloved husband of Tanya Carmody; loving son of Josephine Carmody and Francis Carmody and his wife Molly; beloved brother of Jeanette, Michael, Sean, Brian, Laura, Terrance, Donna and Francis, Jr. and their families. Friends are invited to call at the Burgee-Henss-Seitz Funeral Home, Inc., 3631 Falls Road, on Thursday from 5 to 7 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Thomas Aquinas Church, Hickory Avenue & 37th Street, on Friday at 10 A.M.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2011
To say the Maryland Office of People's Counsel has been busy over the last few years is an understatement. When it comes to electricity, telephone, gas, and water or sewer matters, the People's Counsel works to ensure that the interests of residential customers are represented. The office was created in 1924, with Maryland the first state to establish a consumer advocate agency. Paula M. Carmody heads the 18-person independent agency, which operates with a $3 million annual budget.
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NEWS
February 7, 1994
Joseph Carmody, retired director of the Bureau of Data Processing Accounts at the Social Security Administration headquarters in Woodlawn, died Monday of heart failure at a nursing home in Plymouth Meeting, Pa. He was 82.He moved from Severna Park to West Chester, Pa., after he retired in 1976.He began working at the SSA, then in Baltimore, 40 years earlier. He served in the Army during World War II.Born in Butte, Mont., he was a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley and of the Georgetown University law school.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 5, 2009
Consumer advocates recommended yesterday that the Maryland Public Service Commission instruct utilities to negotiate alternative payment plans with customers who have complained about unusually high bills or those who are already behind in payments. Paula Carmody of the Office of the People's Counsel, which represents residential consumers, said alternative payment plans would be better than a moratorium on service terminations under which people would continue to accrue debt. Under current regulations, utilities may negotiate alternative plans with ratepayers who are not low-income, but are not required to do so. Like those for low-income customers, the plans should take hardship and ability to pay into account, Carmody said.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun Staff | March 18, 2007
Paula M. Carmody recently stepped into the role of people's counsel at what may prove a watershed moment for Maryland's residential utility customers. The state's Public Service Commission is in the midst of a sweeping review of electric deregulation rules that critics contend contributed to a 72 percent rate hike for customers of Baltimore Gas & Electric last year. As the state's chief advocate for utility customers, the new people's counsel is charged with pressing the commission to adopt changes that will take the sting out of future utility bills.
NEWS
September 29, 2005
On Sunday, September 25, 2005, CHARLES DONALD SCHANFELTER, 57, in Summerville, PA; son of the late Charles D. Schanfelter and Shirley (Carstetter) Schanfelter; he is survived by his wife Linda Jean (Davis) Schanfelter; daughters Amber A. Train, Soraja L. Schanfelter, Bethany Lynn Schanfelter; sons Cody L. Schanfelter, Avory C. Schanfelter, Timothy A. Schanfelter; stepsons William Carmody, Clinton Carmody; brother David Schanfelter and sister Carol A. Mills. He is also survived by two grandchildren, Lucas Carmody and Canyon Carmody.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 5, 2009
Consumer advocates recommended yesterday that the Maryland Public Service Commission instruct utilities to negotiate alternative payment plans with customers who have complained about unusually high bills or those who are already behind in payments. Paula Carmody of the Office of the People's Counsel, which represents residential consumers, said alternative payment plans would be better than a moratorium on service terminations under which people would continue to accrue debt. Under current regulations, utilities may negotiate alternative plans with ratepayers who are not low-income, but are not required to do so. Like those for low-income customers, the plans should take hardship and ability to pay into account, Carmody said.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1997
STEVENSVILLE -- Mercury Marine won the Open Division of the Chesapeake Challenge yesterday when second-place Carlos N Charlies flipped near the end of a tight game of cat and mouse played at speeds averaging more than 100 mph.Neither driver Jack Carmody nor throttleman Art Lilly was seriously injured in the flip, although Carmody said Lilly was hospitalized because his artificial hip was dislocated as the two escaped from the overturned catamaran.After some 90 miles of racing, Mercury Marine, a top industry team from Great Neck, N.Y., was in the lead, and driver Stuart Hayim said after the race he thought the other three boats in the Open Class were "out of it."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 10, 2008
D r. Sheldon C. Kravitz, a retired Baltimore oncologist and hematologist, died Tuesday of kidney failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Roland Park Place resident was 83. Dr. Kravitz, the son of a garment worker, was born in Passaic, N.J., and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he graduated with honors in 1941 from Boys High School. In 1945, he earned a bachelor's degree from Cornell University and was a 1948 graduate of Cornell University Medical College. He completed his internship in internal medicine at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center and his residency at Sloan- Kettering Institute, where he was a Damon Runyon Fellow in medical oncology.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1997
This year, it won't be an upset if Princeton gets to the second round of the NCAA tournament.The Tigers' 43-41 defeat of defending champion UCLA last March wasn't the biggest upset in tournament history, just the sweetest. It was a touching send-off for Pete Carril, the Yoda of the coaching set, as Princeton rose well above its 13th seed.Carril is now a curious assistant with the Sacramento Kings, and truth be told, the Tigers don't miss him. Longtime assistant Bill Carmody moved up and seven of the top eight players returned, and Princeton, with a 24-3 record that is its second best since the Bill Bradley era, could get as high as a ninth seed when the tournament draw is announced Sunday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 10, 2008
D r. Sheldon C. Kravitz, a retired Baltimore oncologist and hematologist, died Tuesday of kidney failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Roland Park Place resident was 83. Dr. Kravitz, the son of a garment worker, was born in Passaic, N.J., and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he graduated with honors in 1941 from Boys High School. In 1945, he earned a bachelor's degree from Cornell University and was a 1948 graduate of Cornell University Medical College. He completed his internship in internal medicine at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center and his residency at Sloan- Kettering Institute, where he was a Damon Runyon Fellow in medical oncology.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun Staff | March 18, 2007
Paula M. Carmody recently stepped into the role of people's counsel at what may prove a watershed moment for Maryland's residential utility customers. The state's Public Service Commission is in the midst of a sweeping review of electric deregulation rules that critics contend contributed to a 72 percent rate hike for customers of Baltimore Gas & Electric last year. As the state's chief advocate for utility customers, the new people's counsel is charged with pressing the commission to adopt changes that will take the sting out of future utility bills.
NEWS
September 29, 2005
On Sunday, September 25, 2005, CHARLES DONALD SCHANFELTER, 57, in Summerville, PA; son of the late Charles D. Schanfelter and Shirley (Carstetter) Schanfelter; he is survived by his wife Linda Jean (Davis) Schanfelter; daughters Amber A. Train, Soraja L. Schanfelter, Bethany Lynn Schanfelter; sons Cody L. Schanfelter, Avory C. Schanfelter, Timothy A. Schanfelter; stepsons William Carmody, Clinton Carmody; brother David Schanfelter and sister Carol A. Mills. He is also survived by two grandchildren, Lucas Carmody and Canyon Carmody.
NEWS
August 22, 2005
On August 20, 2005, JOHN W. CARMODY; beloved husband of Alice A. (nee Toole) Carmody; beloved father of Judith C. Long, B. Sue Hirt, Gail E. Rogers and Michael J. Carmody; dear brother of the late Rev. Francis R. Carmody, S.J.; loving grandfather of Matthew and Lauren Long, Gregory and Eleni Rogers, Alex and Katie Hirt. Friends may call at the family owned Leonard J. Ruck Inc. Funeral Home, 5305 Harford Rd (at Echodale) on Monday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Dominic's Church on Tuesday 10 A.M. Interment Parkwood Cemetery.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1997
STEVENSVILLE -- Mercury Marine won the Open Division of the Chesapeake Challenge yesterday when second-place Carlos N Charlies flipped near the end of a tight game of cat and mouse played at speeds averaging more than 100 mph.Neither driver Jack Carmody nor throttleman Art Lilly was seriously injured in the flip, although Carmody said Lilly was hospitalized because his artificial hip was dislocated as the two escaped from the overturned catamaran.After some 90 miles of racing, Mercury Marine, a top industry team from Great Neck, N.Y., was in the lead, and driver Stuart Hayim said after the race he thought the other three boats in the Open Class were "out of it."
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1997
This year, it won't be an upset if Princeton gets to the second round of the NCAA tournament.The Tigers' 43-41 defeat of defending champion UCLA last March wasn't the biggest upset in tournament history, just the sweetest. It was a touching send-off for Pete Carril, the Yoda of the coaching set, as Princeton rose well above its 13th seed.Carril is now a curious assistant with the Sacramento Kings, and truth be told, the Tigers don't miss him. Longtime assistant Bill Carmody moved up and seven of the top eight players returned, and Princeton, with a 24-3 record that is its second best since the Bill Bradley era, could get as high as a ninth seed when the tournament draw is announced Sunday.
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