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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
For many years, critics didn't take French composer Francis Poulenc or his music very seriously, even after his first opera was premiered in 1947. Then again, that entry into the operatic realm wasn't likely to win over skeptics. The title is "The Breasts of Tiresias," and the surreal plot includes a man who fathers 40,000 children in one day. But Poulenc was the real deal, a composer with a distinctive flair for lyrical melody and an ear for exquisite harmony to support it. Those gifts were widely recognized and acclaimed when he created his second work for the stage, "Dialogues of the Carmelites," first heard in 1957.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
It has been nearly 30 years since Francis Poulenc's haunting opera “Dialogues of the Carmelites” was staged in Baltimore. No telling when or if it might return, so the opportunity offered this weekend by Peabody Opera Theatre should not be passed up. This uneven, but ultimately moving, production marks the third annual collaboration between Peabody Conservatory and the Modell/Lyric Performing Arts Center. The public does not seem to appreciate the value of the venture; attendance each year has been modest, as was the case again Friday night for the first of two performances of “Dialogues.” This valuable partnership deserves to be sustained, not to mention enhanced - increased funding would enable larger, more Lyric-scaled sets, for one thing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 29, 2004
Of all the musically and theatrically effective finales in opera, one remains unsurpassed for sheer, crushing emotional weight. In the closing moments of Francis Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites, a group of nuns, unjustly, absurdly accused of crimes against the French Revolution, intone the ancient prayer Salve Regina on the walk to the guillotine. One by one, their voices are stilled, each hideous thud of the blade slicing through the music, but unable to destroy the faith behind it. Poulenc transformed the true story of these women - 16 Carmelites were executed on a single July evening in 1794, only days before the Reign of Terror ended - into an opera with extraordinary sensitivity, insight and beauty.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
For many years, critics didn't take French composer Francis Poulenc or his music very seriously, even after his first opera was premiered in 1947. Then again, that entry into the operatic realm wasn't likely to win over skeptics. The title is "The Breasts of Tiresias," and the surreal plot includes a man who fathers 40,000 children in one day. But Poulenc was the real deal, a composer with a distinctive flair for lyrical melody and an ear for exquisite harmony to support it. Those gifts were widely recognized and acclaimed when he created his second work for the stage, "Dialogues of the Carmelites," first heard in 1957.
NEWS
August 9, 2007
CARMEN C. peacefully passed away on August 5, 2007 at Stella Maris. Born Carmen Maria Calderon Garcia in Puerto Rico, USA on May 17, 1908. Beloved wife of the late Ramon F. Roig, Sr., devoted mother of Maria del Carmen Roig Ferrer and Dr. Ramon F. Roig, Jr. and his wife Aida Nazario Roig, dear grandmother of 10 grandchildren, 16 great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Interment was private. Contributions in her name to the Carmelites, Stella Maris, and Mission Helpers of the Sacred Heart are welcomed.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2005
The names of the sick arrived at the Towson monastery by e-mail. Later in the day, gathering for Vespers, Sister Patricia Scanlan and the other Carmelite nuns would solemnly recite each new name aloud, beseeching God to restore these strangers to health. Each day, millions of religious faithful around the globe make holy appeals like these in behalf of sick friends, relatives and even those unknown to them. Most take it on faith that their prayers make a difference. But now a handful of researchers are wondering: Do prayers from afar really have the power to heal?
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | February 13, 1991
Mother Mary Magdalen of Jesus Crucified Brunck, a member of the Carmelite Sisters of Baltimore for 69 years and prioress for 15, died Saturday at Mercy Villa on Bellona Avenue. She was 92.A mass of Christian burial for Mother Mary Magdalen will be celebrated at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the Carmelite Monastery Chapel, 1318 Dulaney Valley Road in Towson. A vigil service will be held at 8 o'clock tonight.Mother Mary Magdalen led the Baltimore Carmelite community three times -- 1943 to 1949, 1955 to 1961, and 1967 to 1970.
NEWS
January 20, 2003
Sister Kathleen Kirk, a Carmelite nun and organist who learned Greek and Spanish so she could read religious texts in their original language, died Tuesday of heart failure at the order's monastery in Towson. She was 86. Born Margaret Mary Kirk in Columbus, Ohio, she later moved with her family to Washington, D.C., where she graduated from St. Anthony's High School. In 1933, she entered the Carmelite Sisters of Baltimore and took the religious name Sister Kathleen. As a young nun, she studied Greek to be able to read original editions of the Bible and Spanish to read the works of Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross as they were written.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | March 15, 1991
Sister Beatrice Bacchelli Oswald, who was the wife of an internationally known pianist when she entered the Baltimore Carmelite Monastery more than 60 years ago, died Wednesday at Villa Assumpta on Charles Street. She was 96 and the oldest member of the local Carmelite community.A mass of Christian burial for Sister Beatrice will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. tomorrow at the Carmelite Monastery Chapel, 1318 Dulaney Valley Road in Towson. A vigil service will be held at 8 o'clock tonight at the chapel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
It has been nearly 30 years since Francis Poulenc's haunting opera “Dialogues of the Carmelites” was staged in Baltimore. No telling when or if it might return, so the opportunity offered this weekend by Peabody Opera Theatre should not be passed up. This uneven, but ultimately moving, production marks the third annual collaboration between Peabody Conservatory and the Modell/Lyric Performing Arts Center. The public does not seem to appreciate the value of the venture; attendance each year has been modest, as was the case again Friday night for the first of two performances of “Dialogues.” This valuable partnership deserves to be sustained, not to mention enhanced - increased funding would enable larger, more Lyric-scaled sets, for one thing.
NEWS
August 9, 2007
CARMEN C. peacefully passed away on August 5, 2007 at Stella Maris. Born Carmen Maria Calderon Garcia in Puerto Rico, USA on May 17, 1908. Beloved wife of the late Ramon F. Roig, Sr., devoted mother of Maria del Carmen Roig Ferrer and Dr. Ramon F. Roig, Jr. and his wife Aida Nazario Roig, dear grandmother of 10 grandchildren, 16 great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Interment was private. Contributions in her name to the Carmelites, Stella Maris, and Mission Helpers of the Sacred Heart are welcomed.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2005
The names of the sick arrived at the Towson monastery by e-mail. Later in the day, gathering for Vespers, Sister Patricia Scanlan and the other Carmelite nuns would solemnly recite each new name aloud, beseeching God to restore these strangers to health. Each day, millions of religious faithful around the globe make holy appeals like these in behalf of sick friends, relatives and even those unknown to them. Most take it on faith that their prayers make a difference. But now a handful of researchers are wondering: Do prayers from afar really have the power to heal?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 29, 2004
Of all the musically and theatrically effective finales in opera, one remains unsurpassed for sheer, crushing emotional weight. In the closing moments of Francis Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites, a group of nuns, unjustly, absurdly accused of crimes against the French Revolution, intone the ancient prayer Salve Regina on the walk to the guillotine. One by one, their voices are stilled, each hideous thud of the blade slicing through the music, but unable to destroy the faith behind it. Poulenc transformed the true story of these women - 16 Carmelites were executed on a single July evening in 1794, only days before the Reign of Terror ended - into an opera with extraordinary sensitivity, insight and beauty.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2003
As Sister Fran Horner leafed through prayer requests at the Carmelite Sisters of Baltimore monastery, she noticed a recurring theme this holiday season: more people asking the nuns to pray for peace. "I've seen more of them than I did during the war," said Horner, referring to President Bush's declaration of the end of major combat in Iraq on May 1. Christmas marks the birth of Jesus Christ - a time of great celebration for Christians and a traditional time of prayer, especially for peace.
NEWS
January 20, 2003
Sister Kathleen Kirk, a Carmelite nun and organist who learned Greek and Spanish so she could read religious texts in their original language, died Tuesday of heart failure at the order's monastery in Towson. She was 86. Born Margaret Mary Kirk in Columbus, Ohio, she later moved with her family to Washington, D.C., where she graduated from St. Anthony's High School. In 1933, she entered the Carmelite Sisters of Baltimore and took the religious name Sister Kathleen. As a young nun, she studied Greek to be able to read original editions of the Bible and Spanish to read the works of Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross as they were written.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
Therese Martin entered the Carmelite monastery in Lisieux, France, in 1888 as a teen-ager and remained there until her death from tuberculosis at age 24.Her fellow sisters saw nothing extraordinary about her life. She was just a good sister who practiced "the little way," which she described as doing the ordinary things of life with extraordinary love.But a century later, millions of Roman Catholics are venerating the relics of St. Therese of Lisieux as they travel on a worldwide tour. The reliquary containing some of her bones arrived in Baltimore yesterday afternoon as part of a four-month U.S. tour and continues its journey tomorrow, departing for Philadelphia.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
Therese Martin entered the Carmelite monastery in Lisieux, France, in 1888 as a teen-ager and remained there until her death from tuberculosis at age 24.Her fellow sisters saw nothing extraordinary about her life. She was just a good sister who practiced "the little way," which she described as doing the ordinary things of life with extraordinary love.But a century later, millions of Roman Catholics are venerating the relics of St. Therese of Lisieux as they travel on a worldwide tour. The reliquary containing some of her bones arrived in Baltimore yesterday afternoon as part of a four-month U.S. tour and continues its journey tomorrow, departing for Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2003
As Sister Fran Horner leafed through prayer requests at the Carmelite Sisters of Baltimore monastery, she noticed a recurring theme this holiday season: more people asking the nuns to pray for peace. "I've seen more of them than I did during the war," said Horner, referring to President Bush's declaration of the end of major combat in Iraq on May 1. Christmas marks the birth of Jesus Christ - a time of great celebration for Christians and a traditional time of prayer, especially for peace.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | March 15, 1991
Sister Beatrice Bacchelli Oswald, who was the wife of an internationally known pianist when she entered the Baltimore Carmelite Monastery more than 60 years ago, died Wednesday at Villa Assumpta on Charles Street. She was 96 and the oldest member of the local Carmelite community.A mass of Christian burial for Sister Beatrice will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. tomorrow at the Carmelite Monastery Chapel, 1318 Dulaney Valley Road in Towson. A vigil service will be held at 8 o'clock tonight at the chapel.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | February 13, 1991
Mother Mary Magdalen of Jesus Crucified Brunck, a member of the Carmelite Sisters of Baltimore for 69 years and prioress for 15, died Saturday at Mercy Villa on Bellona Avenue. She was 92.A mass of Christian burial for Mother Mary Magdalen will be celebrated at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the Carmelite Monastery Chapel, 1318 Dulaney Valley Road in Towson. A vigil service will be held at 8 o'clock tonight.Mother Mary Magdalen led the Baltimore Carmelite community three times -- 1943 to 1949, 1955 to 1961, and 1967 to 1970.
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