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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 12, 1995
Ask Carly Simon what she likes best about the band she has put together for her first tour in 14 years, and one of the first things she mentions is former Living Colour bassist Doug Wimbish."
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | May 19, 2008
PEOPLE KEEP asking me if someone dies in the Sex and the City movie? The answer is No. No one's even sick, for that matter. This is an urban myth. All the characters remain alive and breathing ready for a sequel, or a sequin. Is there a happy ending? You better believe it. Warner Bros. is counting on at least two." So writes Fox maestro Roger Friedman, just in case you missed him on the Internet. He has seen the movie and doesn't want to tell us too much else about it. But since we recently printed a story from England speculating that someone does die, we want you to have it right from the horse's mouth.
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By Knight-Ridder | October 17, 1990
THE TITLE of Carly Simon's new album, "Have You Seen Me Lately," seems a bit rhetorical; anyone who's been paying attention has seen, and heard, plenty of the singer-songwriter during the past year.The album is Simon's second release of 1990; it was preceded by "My Romance," a record of standards by Rodgers and Hart, Dietz and Schwartz and others. She also appeared on an HBO concert special with Harry Connick Jr., which was turned into a home video, contributed music to the film "Postcards from the Edge" and penned her second children's book, "The Boy of the Bells."
SPORTS
May 15, 2006
Good morning --Carly Simon -- Your "Anticipation" should be the official song of the drawn-out Barry Bonds Watch.
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By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,Boston Globe | July 2, 1995
An earthy Carly Simon graces the cover of July's In Style, the magazine that proves celebrities don't live in hotels. As she philosophizes about her ornate and spectacular Martha's Vineyard estate, Ms. Simon describes how it evolved from James Taylor's "bachelor hippie shack" into her labyrinthine home with 11 decks."
SPORTS
May 15, 2006
Good morning --Carly Simon -- Your "Anticipation" should be the official song of the drawn-out Barry Bonds Watch.
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison | September 9, 2005
AT 26, ROBERT GLASPER is already impressive - a gifted jazz musician with a brilliant, energetic technique and a fresh, mesmerizing sense of melody and composition. A native of Houston, Texas, Glasper will release Canvas, his exuberant debut for Blue Note Records, Oct. 4. He will bring his playful, Herbie-Hancock-influenced style to Washington's Blues Alley Nov. 9. His critically well received first album, Mood, was released on the independent Fresh Sound New Talent label in 2003. Based in New York, Glasper has backed an interesting range of artists, including Carly Simon, Q-Tip and Mos Def. An accessible, fluid stylist who at times weaves hip-hop, gospel and R&B influences through his compositions, Glasper is a musically illuminating cat with a limitless future in modern jazz.
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By Christopher Andersen | July 14, 1993
James Taylor had had a long and highly publicized affair with folk singer Joni Mitchell, but he had a new love now and he wanted Mick Jagger to meet her. With hits like "That's The Way I've Always Heard It Should Be" (inspired by a run-in with a casting-couch producer in Nashville) and "Anticipation," Carly Simon was a major star in her own right.She was involved with Warren Beatty when she met Taylor at a Carnegie Hall concert in late 1971. Now they seemed to Jagger to be very much in love -- reason enough for Mick to pursue her. Then there were her looks.
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By New York Times | October 22, 1991
In the 1960s and '70s, rock stars had literary pretentions on a grown-up scale. Bob Dylan's "Tarantula," for one, read like an attempt to combine "Finnegans Wake" and Gertrude Stein.Now, with the graying of the original rock generation, the main literary influences seem to be "The Little Engine That Could" and "Where the Wild Things Are."A walk through the children's section at bookstores lately feels oddly like a stroll through a music store -- Carly Simon on one shelf, Michael Jackson on another and over in the corner, Jimmy Buffett's latest -- as rock and pop stars cross over in ever greater numbers from adult music to children's literature.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | September 10, 1993
THE carrot dangled in front of the PLO is that if Yasser Arafat could get his people to agree on a peace settlement with Israel, President Clinton has promised to take him to Martha's Vineyard next summer.The offer was personally made by the president to the PLO leader over the telephone. Reports indicate that Bill told Yasser, "You've been bargaining in good faith and therefore you deserve a vacation on the Vineyard."Yasser, who watches CNN day and night, responded, "Can I stay in Bob McNamara's house?"
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison | September 9, 2005
AT 26, ROBERT GLASPER is already impressive - a gifted jazz musician with a brilliant, energetic technique and a fresh, mesmerizing sense of melody and composition. A native of Houston, Texas, Glasper will release Canvas, his exuberant debut for Blue Note Records, Oct. 4. He will bring his playful, Herbie-Hancock-influenced style to Washington's Blues Alley Nov. 9. His critically well received first album, Mood, was released on the independent Fresh Sound New Talent label in 2003. Based in New York, Glasper has backed an interesting range of artists, including Carly Simon, Q-Tip and Mos Def. An accessible, fluid stylist who at times weaves hip-hop, gospel and R&B influences through his compositions, Glasper is a musically illuminating cat with a limitless future in modern jazz.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 21, 2003
He's a little guy with a big heart. What's not to love? Shamelessly heart-tugging and defiantly uncomplicated, Piglet's Big Movie offers the smallest of A.A. Milne's irresistible Pooh characters some time in the spotlight, and the result is the sort of feel-good lesson kids will enjoy and parents should welcome. Poor Piglet, voiced as always (at least since 1968) by John Fiedler, is feeling chronically underappreciated. As always, he's among the most resourceful of the Pooh gang, as well as the most eager to please.
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By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,Boston Globe | July 2, 1995
An earthy Carly Simon graces the cover of July's In Style, the magazine that proves celebrities don't live in hotels. As she philosophizes about her ornate and spectacular Martha's Vineyard estate, Ms. Simon describes how it evolved from James Taylor's "bachelor hippie shack" into her labyrinthine home with 11 decks."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 12, 1995
Ask Carly Simon what she likes best about the band she has put together for her first tour in 14 years, and one of the first things she mentions is former Living Colour bassist Doug Wimbish."
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | February 18, 1994
If "The Secret Garden" is to bloom, Jeff Halpern must carefully tend to its score.Mr. Halpern, music director and conductor for the touring Broadway musical version of the classic children's novel, running at the Lyric Opera House through Sunday, is as enthusiastic as any backyard gardener in describing the musical influences planted in the score.He cites influences ranging from turn-of-the-century French classical music to English and American folk tunes of the same period. And because it was composed by Lucy Simon -- sister of pop singer Carly Simon -- it's not surprising this eclectic score also has contemporary-sounding moments.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | September 10, 1993
THE carrot dangled in front of the PLO is that if Yasser Arafat could get his people to agree on a peace settlement with Israel, President Clinton has promised to take him to Martha's Vineyard next summer.The offer was personally made by the president to the PLO leader over the telephone. Reports indicate that Bill told Yasser, "You've been bargaining in good faith and therefore you deserve a vacation on the Vineyard."Yasser, who watches CNN day and night, responded, "Can I stay in Bob McNamara's house?"
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 21, 2003
He's a little guy with a big heart. What's not to love? Shamelessly heart-tugging and defiantly uncomplicated, Piglet's Big Movie offers the smallest of A.A. Milne's irresistible Pooh characters some time in the spotlight, and the result is the sort of feel-good lesson kids will enjoy and parents should welcome. Poor Piglet, voiced as always (at least since 1968) by John Fiedler, is feeling chronically underappreciated. As always, he's among the most resourceful of the Pooh gang, as well as the most eager to please.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | February 18, 1994
If "The Secret Garden" is to bloom, Jeff Halpern must carefully tend to its score.Mr. Halpern, music director and conductor for the touring Broadway musical version of the classic children's novel, running at the Lyric Opera House through Sunday, is as enthusiastic as any backyard gardener in describing the musical influences planted in the score.He cites influences ranging from turn-of-the-century French classical music to English and American folk tunes of the same period. And because it was composed by Lucy Simon -- sister of pop singer Carly Simon -- it's not surprising this eclectic score also has contemporary-sounding moments.
FEATURES
By Christopher Andersen | July 14, 1993
James Taylor had had a long and highly publicized affair with folk singer Joni Mitchell, but he had a new love now and he wanted Mick Jagger to meet her. With hits like "That's The Way I've Always Heard It Should Be" (inspired by a run-in with a casting-couch producer in Nashville) and "Anticipation," Carly Simon was a major star in her own right.She was involved with Warren Beatty when she met Taylor at a Carnegie Hall concert in late 1971. Now they seemed to Jagger to be very much in love -- reason enough for Mick to pursue her. Then there were her looks.
FEATURES
By New York Times | October 22, 1991
In the 1960s and '70s, rock stars had literary pretentions on a grown-up scale. Bob Dylan's "Tarantula," for one, read like an attempt to combine "Finnegans Wake" and Gertrude Stein.Now, with the graying of the original rock generation, the main literary influences seem to be "The Little Engine That Could" and "Where the Wild Things Are."A walk through the children's section at bookstores lately feels oddly like a stroll through a music store -- Carly Simon on one shelf, Michael Jackson on another and over in the corner, Jimmy Buffett's latest -- as rock and pop stars cross over in ever greater numbers from adult music to children's literature.
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