Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCarlos Fuentes
IN THE NEWS

Carlos Fuentes

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Sun Staff | July 7, 1996
"A New Time For Mexico," by Carlos Fuentes. 215 pages. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. $23.The cry for true democratic reform in Mexico has grown fierce and strong, but never has it been more eloquent and provocative than in Carlos Fuentes' new book, "A New Time For Mexico."In the style that has made him Mexico's leading literary figure, Fuentes weaves prose with political commentary to bring alive and demand support for the struggle of his country's poor and powerless to win not only the most basic of rights, but political clout.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JUDITH REDDING and JUDITH REDDING,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
The Eagle's Throne Carlos Fuentes; trans. by Kristina Cordero Random House / 340 pages / $26.95 Carlos Fuentes, a longtime critic of American imperialism and economic policies in Latin America, is best known for his 1962 novel The Death of Artemio Cruz. A lawyer and Mexican dissident, Fuentes has had a political career that runs the gamut: assistant head of the press section of Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, head of the Department of Cultural Relations and, after a period of exile in Paris, Mexican ambassador to France.
Advertisement
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- As the president of the world's most powerful nation visits the world's most populous nation, note that the future is being defined by disintegrative forces worldwide.In Europe in 1500 there were approximately 500 political entities. By the beginning of the 19th century there were a few dozen. The unifications of Italy and Germany further reduced the number. By 1920 Europe had 23 states with 18,000 kilometers of borders. But by 1994 it had 50 states and 40,000 kilometers of borders.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and By Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | October 8, 2000
"The Years with Laura Diaz," by Carlos Fuentes. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 518 pages. $26. Mexico's leading novelist, Carlos Fuentes, the author of "The Old Gringo" and "The Death of Artemio Cruz," wastes the possibility of producing a great national epic through self-indulgent writing and a persistent unwillingness to edit his own material. Based largely on stories of his family and Fuentes' vast knowledge of 20th century Mexican history, "The Years with Laura Diaz" traces the life of its fictitious heroine through selected moments in her life which also connect with the ongoing history of the country.
NEWS
By JUDITH REDDING and JUDITH REDDING,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
The Eagle's Throne Carlos Fuentes; trans. by Kristina Cordero Random House / 340 pages / $26.95 Carlos Fuentes, a longtime critic of American imperialism and economic policies in Latin America, is best known for his 1962 novel The Death of Artemio Cruz. A lawyer and Mexican dissident, Fuentes has had a political career that runs the gamut: assistant head of the press section of Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, head of the Department of Cultural Relations and, after a period of exile in Paris, Mexican ambassador to France.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | October 27, 1991
THE CAMPAIGN.Carlos Fuentes; translated fromthe Spanish by Alfred MacAdam.Farrar, Straus & Giroux.246 pages. $22.95.Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes' new novel, the first of a projected trilogy titled "The Romantic Time," is set during the decade of Latin America's Wars of Independence, from 1810 to 1820. Mr. Fuentes brings his erudition, his synthesizing intelligence and his love of intricacy to this story of Baltasar Bustos, the Creole son of a ranch owner in the Argentine pampas. The novel is narrated by Bustos' friend, a printer and clock collector named Manuel Varela.
NEWS
By Melissa Grace | October 29, 1995
"Diana: The Goddess Who Hunts Alone," by Carlos Fuentes. Translated by Alfred Mac Adam. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 217 pages. $22If a fox can out-fox another fox, then that is what happens in this prolific and distinguished author's latest and seemingly semi-autobiographic novella. The hero and narrator is a 41-year-old, notorious womanizer and successful Mexican man of letters with a beautiful actress-wife who steps aside whenever he gets the itch to be with another. That is until this last time when his love for the nymph-like Diana, Hollywood starlet and political activist, takes him into a world he thought was his own. This book is a refreshingly literary international thriller that demands a Saturday afternoon in front of the fireplace.
NEWS
By Cary Clack | June 24, 1998
SAN ANTONIO -- Rainbows often follow storms, breaking the darkness with an arc of iridescent hope.The storm of racial hate that swept across the life of James Byrd Jr. in Jasper, Texas, can never be expunged from that community's landscape or the nation's consciousness. The act was too brutal and resonated with memories of times past when black bodies hung from Southern trees.But in the aftermath of Byrd's death, hope is seen as Jasper's residents -- black, white and brown -- reach out to one another to grieve and comprehend the vicious crime.
FEATURES
By Allen Josephs and Allen Josephs,Newsday | April 13, 1994
Mexican novelist Carlos Fuentes' magical new book, "The Orange Tree," snakes together five novellas into an intricately coiled mass in which heads and tails, beginnings and endings, fiction and history become deliberately indistinguishable. These are tales told by the dead, full of sound and fury, signifying all of Mr. Fuentes' obsessions: among other things the transmigration souls, the music of the spheres, the nature of God, man's inhumanity, duality and, as the original Spanish version made clear in its subtitle (omitted in English)
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | February 26, 2006
THE LIFE AND TIMES OF FRIDA KAHLO / / PBS Home Video / Daylight Films / $24.95 Frida Kahlo was the first Mexican modern artist to have her work hung in the Louvre, but the price she paid for her achievement was one of crushing emotional torment and lifelong physical pain. She was a vibrant 19-year-old university student in 1926 when a trolley car accident left her body crippled for life; she began painting during her convalescence as a way of passing time. A few years later she fell in love with the great Mexican muralist Diego Rivera, 21 years her senior; the two married and embarked on a passionate, tempestuous relationship that would last until Kahlo's death in 1954 at the age of 47. Until the end, despite countless well-publicized infidelities on both their parts, Rivera remained the one great love of Kahlo's life.
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- As the president of the world's most powerful nation visits the world's most populous nation, note that the future is being defined by disintegrative forces worldwide.In Europe in 1500 there were approximately 500 political entities. By the beginning of the 19th century there were a few dozen. The unifications of Italy and Germany further reduced the number. By 1920 Europe had 23 states with 18,000 kilometers of borders. But by 1994 it had 50 states and 40,000 kilometers of borders.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | October 27, 1991
THE CAMPAIGN.Carlos Fuentes; translated fromthe Spanish by Alfred MacAdam.Farrar, Straus & Giroux.246 pages. $22.95.Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes' new novel, the first of a projected trilogy titled "The Romantic Time," is set during the decade of Latin America's Wars of Independence, from 1810 to 1820. Mr. Fuentes brings his erudition, his synthesizing intelligence and his love of intricacy to this story of Baltasar Bustos, the Creole son of a ranch owner in the Argentine pampas. The novel is narrated by Bustos' friend, a printer and clock collector named Manuel Varela.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | November 21, 1994
AUSTIN, Texas -- Is publishing going the way of the dinosaurs? Or will it be revitalized through technological wizardry, like the reconstituted beasts of "Jurassic Park"?These were the questions but there were no clear answers as publishers, editors, writers and leaders in technology gathered at the University of Texas Nov. 12-13 to ponder "The State and Fate of Publishing." The symposium was sponsored by UT's Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center in honor of Fleur Cowles, the founder of Flair magazine.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.