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Carl Vinson

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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Rear Adm. Thomas E. Zelibor, commander of the Carl Vinson carrier group, went without sleep on the opening night of the war. He was gripped with anticipation while his aircraft waged combat from the Arabian Sea. "You play a `what if' game," Zelibor said yesterday. "`If this happens, what will I do next?' You have to do that to try and stay one step ahead. That occupied a lot of my zero hours of sleep that night." Sitting at a conference table in his ward room, Zelibor appeared relaxed even as planes took off and landed at a rapid pace on the deck above.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 3, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - A critical mission faced Rear Adm. Thomas E. Zelibor during the last battle on the last day of the 1991 gulf war. He was a radar intercept officer, riding in the rear seat of an F-14 Tomcat, his pilot and their wingman receiving an emergency call and roaring 100 miles across the Iraqi skies to a land battle south of Baghdad. They were in search of an enemy helicopter, a phantom menace on a night lighted by tracer fire and tank flashes. "We were down there, lights out, at night, low altitude, maneuvering over the battle, and there was a shot at our wingman," he recalls.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 14, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Resuming bombing missions over Afghanistan yesterday after a one-day break, some of the pilots launching off this aircraft carrier in the Arabian Sea reflected on the experience of war. "The big thing we've learned in a week is the president told us this was going to be a long, drawn-out process," said Capt. T.C. Bennett, the Air Wing commander. "That is indeed going to be true because of the pin-point accuracy that we're demanding. People are settled into that."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 1, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Their jets sound like souped-up vacuum cleaners and their mission is as unglamorous as it is important. They are the VS-29 Dragonfires, the gas guys who fill up the bombers so they can make their runs to Afghanistan. The gas guys fly 25-year-old S-3B Viking jets, part of a string of airborne "gas stations" that are the New Jersey Turnpike rest stops of the sky for the bombers taking off here in the Arabian Sea. They can be found walking around a pilot ready-room waving a water pistol, offering Halloween candy to a visitor or wearing a Norse helmet and blond locks as they prepare for a catapult off an aircraft carrier.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 10, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - An aircraft carrier at war is a steel platform for the attack planes that thunder off its flight deck. It is also a floating city with people like Goose from San Diego, who toils in its belly assembling ordnance and says his job is "putting bombs on terrorists' foreheads." In this city, Curt from Cottage Grove, Ore., regulates steam valves that power the launch catapult; he works in a room where the thermometer never dips below 99 degrees. The job of a petty officer from New York is to kneel at the front wheel of a 69,000-pound jet that is revving, screeching and girding for war, to make sure it is hooked into a catapult.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 14, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - There is little time for a father at war to brood over missing Halloween and a son's birthday. A Navy lieutenant named Tom, born and raised in Towson, settles for making a daily stop in a lounge to look at a wall-sized October calendar adorned with the crew's family photos. Amid the wedding and family snaps, there is a picture of the lieutenant's son dressed in a green turtle suit for Halloween, waiting for his father to return home. "I feel very safe out here," the lieutenant says.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 13, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - After launching warplanes for five days against Afghanistan, this nuclear-powered aircraft carrier busied itself yesterday taking aboard supplies. Its needs included the following: More than 1 million gallons of jet fuel. Ten thousand pounds of potatoes. One hundred forty-four thousand eggs. Nine thousand six hundred cans of beer, to be stored in a weapons magazine and broken out only when the ship has been away from port for 45 days, which, as everyone among the Vinson's 5,500-member crew knows, is coming up soon.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 12, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - After five days of launching air sorties over Afghanistan, this nuclear-powered aircraft carrier cruising the Arabian Sea ended the opening phase of its mission last night, a senior officer said. But what the next phase will be is unclear, the officer said. "We're going to take a break from flying," Capt. Rick Wren, the commanding officer, announced to his 5,500-member crew before last night's wave of sorties. "We're going to shift our energies ... time to restock."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 25, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Around here, Groundhog Day isn't a movie, it's a way of life and the way sailors and pilots describe the daily repetition of eating, sleeping and waging war. From the vantage point of this nuclear-powered aircraft carrier cruising the Arabian Sea, the third week of the air war over Afghanistan looks, feels and sounds much like the first. Crews smudged with grease and sweat fight off exhaustion and continue the arduous and often dangerous task of maintaining, catapulting and retrieving high-powered strike jets.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON -- U.S. warplanes, after forcing many troops out of their hideaways, hit hard at Taliban front lines north of Kabul yesterday. The attacks were proceeding well, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld said in Washington, going according to the plan "to put pressure on over a sustained period." For pilots on this nuclear-powered aircraft carrier in the Arabian Sea, that has come to include what they call "cave hunting." In recent days, the planes launched from this ship have gone on missions to strike at the underground hideaways that loom large in the lore of fighting in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON -- U.S. warplanes, after forcing many troops out of their hideaways, hit hard at Taliban front lines north of Kabul yesterday. The attacks were proceeding well, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld said in Washington, going according to the plan "to put pressure on over a sustained period." For pilots on this nuclear-powered aircraft carrier in the Arabian Sea, that has come to include what they call "cave hunting." In recent days, the planes launched from this ship have gone on missions to strike at the underground hideaways that loom large in the lore of fighting in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 25, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Around here, Groundhog Day isn't a movie, it's a way of life and the way sailors and pilots describe the daily repetition of eating, sleeping and waging war. From the vantage point of this nuclear-powered aircraft carrier cruising the Arabian Sea, the third week of the air war over Afghanistan looks, feels and sounds much like the first. Crews smudged with grease and sweat fight off exhaustion and continue the arduous and often dangerous task of maintaining, catapulting and retrieving high-powered strike jets.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 14, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - There is little time for a father at war to brood over missing Halloween and a son's birthday. A Navy lieutenant named Tom, born and raised in Towson, settles for making a daily stop in a lounge to look at a wall-sized October calendar adorned with the crew's family photos. Amid the wedding and family snaps, there is a picture of the lieutenant's son dressed in a green turtle suit for Halloween, waiting for his father to return home. "I feel very safe out here," the lieutenant says.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 14, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Resuming bombing missions over Afghanistan yesterday after a one-day break, some of the pilots launching off this aircraft carrier in the Arabian Sea reflected on the experience of war. "The big thing we've learned in a week is the president told us this was going to be a long, drawn-out process," said Capt. T.C. Bennett, the Air Wing commander. "That is indeed going to be true because of the pin-point accuracy that we're demanding. People are settled into that."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 13, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - After launching warplanes for five days against Afghanistan, this nuclear-powered aircraft carrier busied itself yesterday taking aboard supplies. Its needs included the following: More than 1 million gallons of jet fuel. Ten thousand pounds of potatoes. One hundred forty-four thousand eggs. Nine thousand six hundred cans of beer, to be stored in a weapons magazine and broken out only when the ship has been away from port for 45 days, which, as everyone among the Vinson's 5,500-member crew knows, is coming up soon.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 12, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - After five days of launching air sorties over Afghanistan, this nuclear-powered aircraft carrier cruising the Arabian Sea ended the opening phase of its mission last night, a senior officer said. But what the next phase will be is unclear, the officer said. "We're going to take a break from flying," Capt. Rick Wren, the commanding officer, announced to his 5,500-member crew before last night's wave of sorties. "We're going to shift our energies ... time to restock."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Twenty-two years in the Navy and Monday was his first combat mission, the one where he packed a pistol and a peanut butter sandwich, and flew off a carrier deck in the Arabian Sea and on to Afghanistan. His country might own the skies above a foreign land but the Navy captain, first name Chuck, admitted that this was different, unlike training. He was fully loaded with live bombs now, heading north over Pakistan and into the night. "The tension," he said later.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 1, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Their jets sound like souped-up vacuum cleaners and their mission is as unglamorous as it is important. They are the VS-29 Dragonfires, the gas guys who fill up the bombers so they can make their runs to Afghanistan. The gas guys fly 25-year-old S-3B Viking jets, part of a string of airborne "gas stations" that are the New Jersey Turnpike rest stops of the sky for the bombers taking off here in the Arabian Sea. They can be found walking around a pilot ready-room waving a water pistol, offering Halloween candy to a visitor or wearing a Norse helmet and blond locks as they prepare for a catapult off an aircraft carrier.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Rear Adm. Thomas E. Zelibor, commander of the Carl Vinson carrier group, went without sleep on the opening night of the war. He was gripped with anticipation while his aircraft waged combat from the Arabian Sea. "You play a `what if' game," Zelibor said yesterday. "`If this happens, what will I do next?' You have to do that to try and stay one step ahead. That occupied a lot of my zero hours of sleep that night." Sitting at a conference table in his ward room, Zelibor appeared relaxed even as planes took off and landed at a rapid pace on the deck above.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Twenty-two years in the Navy and Monday was his first combat mission, the one where he packed a pistol and a peanut butter sandwich, and flew off a carrier deck in the Arabian Sea and on to Afghanistan. His country might own the skies above a foreign land but the Navy captain, first name Chuck, admitted that this was different, unlike training. He was fully loaded with live bombs now, heading north over Pakistan and into the night. "The tension," he said later.
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