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Carl Stokes

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By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | March 9, 2010
Carl Stokes, a founder of a Baltimore charter school, was elected unanimously by the City Council to fill a vacant seat in the 12th District, returning him to the body on which he served for eight years. The 59-year-old Stokes, who was first elected to the council in 1987, is the co-founder and chief operating officer of East Baltimore's Bluford Drew Jemison Math Science Technology Academy. He fills the seat vacated by Bernard C. "Jack" Young, who is now the council president. Stokes' election is the last in a series of moves triggered by Sheila Dixon's resignation as mayor.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Monsignor Edward Michael Miller, the longtime pastor of St. Bernardine's Roman Catholic Church who was recalled as the "shepherd" of West Baltimore, died Sunday as he prepared to say Mass. He was 68. Monsignor Miller was found by parish members when he did not arrive at the church, where he had been pastor for 33 years. He had suffered a heart attack. "He was part of the urban Roman Catholic fabric in Baltimore," said City Council member Carl Stokes. "Every good urban Catholic knew Father Miller.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 21, 1999
Don't look now but Carl Stokes is a credible and substantial candidate for mayor. Bill takes one look at Slobodan Milosevic and sees Ken Starr. Send more bombers. First Maryland, a subsidiary of Allied Irish, paid big bucks to think up Allfirst Financial for its new moniker, when it could have had free advice to adopt Allied American instead. If the Great One has retired, can the Iron Man be far behind? Pub Date: 4/21/99
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Construction to convert an old chemical plant site to a glittering waterfront development could begin next month after the Baltimore City Council gave final approval Monday to more than $100 million in taxpayer assistance for the controversial Harbor Point project. "We want to build a great project that is successful for the whole city," the developer, Michael S. Beatty, said after the vote. "It will create thousands and thousands of jobs. " Officials of his firm said they hope to break ground on the project's signature skyscraper - a new regional headquarters for the energy giant Exelon - on Oct. 15. Council members voted 11-3, with one abstention, to approve $107 million in tax-increment-financing bonds despite months of protests, objections from downtown business leaders and a late effort by community groups, activists and unions to amend the legislation.
FEATURES
November 7, 1997
Today in history: Nov. 7In 1874, the Republican Party was symbolized as an elephant in a cartoon by Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly magazine.In 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to Congress.In 1917, Russia's Bolshevik Revolution took place as forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky.In 1967, Carl Stokes was elected the first black mayor of a major city -- Cleveland, Ohio.In 1989, L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia became the first elected black governor in U.S. history; David N. Dinkins was elected New York City's first black mayor.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 16, 1999
CARL Stokes, who is running for mayor of Baltimore, made the following statement the other day: "I want to set the record straight and clear up any confusion. I would not want an error like this to create a misperception about me." What misperception? The misperception that Carl Stokes is a college graduate? I might be wrong, but it sounds like ole Carl has stumbled across a new campaign theme: The city of Baltimore has had 12 years of an Ivy League-Rhodes Scholar Mayor and what has that gotten us?
NEWS
January 10, 2011
On Thursday, the City Council fulfilled our low expectations by selecting a well-connected convicted criminal over better qualified and law-abiding candidates for the vacant council seat in the 9th District ( "Despite criminal record, council picks Welch for seat," Jan. 6). This is the same City Council that turned a blind eye to the illegal activities of Sheila Dixon and Helen Holton and appointed another person of questionable integrity, Carl Stokes, to the council seat vacated by Jack Young (who has his own well-documented ethical issues)
NEWS
July 8, 1994
Unlike Chicago, dead people seldom vote in Baltimore elections. That does not mean that the Monumental City is without traditions of skulduggery, though. Just ask Carl Stokes.Mr. Stokes is the city councilman who wanted to go to the state Senate from East Baltimore's 45th District and then use his victory to build momentum for a campaign for City Council president.Whether any of that is going to happen is now uncertain because a political unknown named Clyde A. Stokes filed to oppose him, thus effectively giving the election away to Nathaniel J. McFadden.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | August 12, 1999
SOME PEOPLE get it. Carl Stokes, for example, and Martin O'Malley, too. And legislators such as Clarence Blount and Jim Campbell and Tony Fulton who stand on one side of the street, and those such as Pete Rawlings and Joan Carter Conway standing on the other, but not so far away that they can't hear echoes of each other's heartbeats in the midst of political struggle.And some people don't get it. Julius Henson, for example, and Nathaniel McFadden, too. Henson tried to turn this mayoral campaign into the slummy revival of 1995.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Construction to convert an old chemical plant site to a glittering waterfront development could begin next month after the Baltimore City Council gave final approval Monday to more than $100 million in taxpayer assistance for the controversial Harbor Point project. "We want to build a great project that is successful for the whole city," the developer, Michael S. Beatty, said after the vote. "It will create thousands and thousands of jobs. " Officials of his firm said they hope to break ground on the project's signature skyscraper - a new regional headquarters for the energy giant Exelon - on Oct. 15. Council members voted 11-3, with one abstention, to approve $107 million in tax-increment-financing bonds despite months of protests, objections from downtown business leaders and a late effort by community groups, activists and unions to amend the legislation.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
After weeks of protests, the Baltimore City Council granted preliminary approval Monday evening to more than $100 million in public financing for the upscale Harbor Point development. In an 11-3 vote, the council authorized bonds to pay for the project's infrastructure and for nearby parks. The body will take a final vote on the subsidy next month, when approval is expected. "To me, the long-term return on investment outweighs any shortcomings early on," Councilman Robert W. Curran, a supporter of the plan, said after the meeting.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake says the city has nothing to lose and much to gain by borrowing $107 million to pay for new roads, parks and other infrastructure at Harbor Point, a now-empty tract envisioned as a glittering mini-city on Baltimore's waterfront. Under the city's plan, the money would be repaid from property taxes generated at the site, with the developer responsible for any shortfall. And if the $1 billion project takes off - as a place for thousands to live, work and shop - the city eventually expects to take in an average of $20 million a year in new taxes, even after paying off the bonds and for services such as fire and police.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2011
Bernard C. "Jack" Young, picked by his fellow City Council members last year to lead the panel, won the Democratic nomination Tuesday to keep the office for four more years. It was the first citywide campaign for Young, a 15-year veteran of the council. He defeated a field of challengers that included Tom Kiefaber, the former owner of the Senator Theatre . Surrounded by supporters at a victory celebration downtown, Young said he would not take his victory for granted. "That's not my nature," said Young, 57. "People shouldn't feel trapped here.
NEWS
January 10, 2011
On Thursday, the City Council fulfilled our low expectations by selecting a well-connected convicted criminal over better qualified and law-abiding candidates for the vacant council seat in the 9th District ( "Despite criminal record, council picks Welch for seat," Jan. 6). This is the same City Council that turned a blind eye to the illegal activities of Sheila Dixon and Helen Holton and appointed another person of questionable integrity, Carl Stokes, to the council seat vacated by Jack Young (who has his own well-documented ethical issues)
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | March 9, 2010
Carl Stokes, a founder of a Baltimore charter school, was elected unanimously by the City Council to fill a vacant seat in the 12th District, returning him to the body on which he served for eight years. The 59-year-old Stokes, who was first elected to the council in 1987, is the co-founder and chief operating officer of East Baltimore's Bluford Drew Jemison Math Science Technology Academy. He fills the seat vacated by Bernard C. "Jack" Young, who is now the council president. Stokes' election is the last in a series of moves triggered by Sheila Dixon's resignation as mayor.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 5, 2007
Carl Stokes fills his days working to get a new all-male city charter school off the ground. The former 2nd District Baltimore City Council member who ran unsuccessfully for mayor in 1999 wants to open the Bluford Drew Jemison Math Science Technology Academy in East Baltimore by late August. "This is going to be much more rewarding than politics," he said this week. Stokes will be director of operations at the school, which is supported by public funds. He also hopes to raise $750,000 from local philanthropic organizations.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker and Michael Olesker,SUN COLUMNIST | August 31, 1999
Well, I got my man.After watching last night's televised debate among Carl Stokes, Martin O'Malley and Lawrence Bell, it's clear to me who should be the next mayor of Baltimore.Unfortunately, Kweisi Mfume isn't running.He only moderated last night's debate -- but such is his stature that each candidate, eager to show his intimate relationship with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People leader who walked away from his own sure shot at City Hall, declared, "Well, Kweisi," at the beginning of each answer with such lock-step response that viewers might have imagined Mfume held the only vote in town.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 16, 1999
AT 15 MINUTES before 10 o'clock Tuesday night, the night he all but got himself elected mayor of Baltimore, a soaking-wet Martin O'Malley stepped from a shower and did what every man in his situation wishes to do: He reached protectively for some precinct returns."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2003
Carl Stokes doesn't own a single pair of blue jeans. The one-time clothing store owner who hopes to become the next City Council president relaxes in dress slacks at home. He cuts a relentlessly dapper figure on the campaign trail, sporting suit and tie -- not just in formal debates, but as he waves at traffic in sweltering heat. He ignores advisers who urge him to dress down. "I think it's from school," said Stokes, 53. "I was a parochial school kid. I always wore a white shirt and tie. We always wore dress pants, even in kindergarten.
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