Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCarl Sagan
IN THE NEWS

Carl Sagan

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 28, 1996
WHEN THE robotic probe Mars Pathfinder touches down on the Red Planet on Independence Day, take a moment to remember Carl Sagan. As much as any scientist, Dr. Sagan was responsible for the public support needed to fund expensive space explorations. He did it by taking science to the people.Dr. Sagan didn't talk about the origins of the universe or the possibility of life on another planet just with scientists. He used television to spread his excitement to mass audiences, appearing on "The Tonight Show" 26 times.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014
If you're throwing a 1940s-themed party, you can't go wrong with Baltimore musician Bosley. In fact, it'd be a bit remiss not to include him. "Sultry dance music, louche behavior and hijinx," is how the 28-year-old (full name: Bosley Brown) described what to expect when he headlines the Party at the Patterson, dubbed "Lipstick," on Friday at the Creative Alliance (8 p.m., $7-$15; 3134 Eastern Ave.). The Lipstick gig begins another busy year for the Hamilton resident, who said he's influenced by everything from the Beatles and Miles Davis to Otis Redding and Teddy Pendergrass.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
Dribs and drabs from the notebookFor Gregory Paul Andorfer, apparently it's not enough to win all sorts of Peabody and Emmy awards and to help put "Cosmos" on the air. At least, it's not enough to persuade him to stay in television.Andorfer, a former bigwig at WQED in Pittsburgh, one of the country's leading PBS stations, took over as executive director of the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore last month.Andorfer replaces Paul Hanle, who left the center in December.If the center was looking for someone versed in making science accessible to the masses, they seem to have looked in the right place.
NEWS
By Steven Gimbel | June 22, 2007
Don Herbert, who died last week from cancer, was better known to generations as Mr. Wizard. The irony in the name is that he was nothing like a wizard. He did not stand apart from us as a purveyor of secret magic, a power over which he alone had command, inspiring awe. Instead, in two popular TV shows spanning nearly half a century, Mr. Wizard brought science to all of us. Lacking the flash and dazzle of today's children's programming, Mr. Wizard would present an interesting situation and provide room for us to think along as he guided us to an understanding of the world we live in. His demonstrations grabbed our attention, but he always left us appreciating the universe as a well-organized place.
NEWS
March 20, 1997
Ralph Santiago Abascal, 62, general counsel of California Rural Legal Assistance and one of the state's foremost lawyers for the poor, died Monday of cancer in Berkeley, Calif. In nearly 30 years as a legal services lawyer, he worked on more than 200 lawsuits, including those that maintained Medi-Cal abortions forpoor women, preserved a workplace safety inspection program and expanded state restrictions on discharge of toxic chemicals.Bill Bradley, 73, originator of the "Gypsy Robe" tradition that has been a symbol of good luck through decades of Broadway productions, died Monday in New York from complications after a stroke.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1997
On a scale between infinite space and infinitesimal particles dwell creatures called humans. They are drops in the cosmic well. But despite their paltry insignificance in the great scheme of things, these beings are so wondrous that they can take us from universe to quark in a mere 35 minutes.That is the journey we undertake in "Cosmic Voyage," the new IMAX film playing at the Maryland Science Center as part of its "To the Stars" theme in this Baltimore bicentennial. Writer, director and producer Bayley Silleck makes us feel tiny in his depictions of the vastness of the cosmos, but he also exhilarates with this vision of our mysterious beginnings and our place in the universe.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014
If you're throwing a 1940s-themed party, you can't go wrong with Baltimore musician Bosley. In fact, it'd be a bit remiss not to include him. "Sultry dance music, louche behavior and hijinx," is how the 28-year-old (full name: Bosley Brown) described what to expect when he headlines the Party at the Patterson, dubbed "Lipstick," on Friday at the Creative Alliance (8 p.m., $7-$15; 3134 Eastern Ave.). The Lipstick gig begins another busy year for the Hamilton resident, who said he's influenced by everything from the Beatles and Miles Davis to Otis Redding and Teddy Pendergrass.
NEWS
By Salim Muwakkil | September 1, 1999
CARL SAGAN, the late astronomer and prolific author, once wrote a pseudonymous essay touting marijuana as a stimulus to his intellectual work.In fact, according to an article by his biographer in the Aug. 22 San Francisco Examiner magazine, Sagan was an avid pot smoker for most of his life.Not surprisingly, news of the influential astronomer's smoking choice had to hide under a pseudonym or wait until his death, lest he suffer America's puritanical wrath.It's the same wrath currently being ducked by George W. Bush, as he refuses to answer questions about his "rebellious" youth.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1997
Take it from the stargazer's mouth: "Contact" pretty much gets things right.The thrill of the hunt, the dedication, the basic scientific principles, the enormous odds researchers battle, looking for radio waves of extra-terrestrial origin -- all that's there, Hubble scientist David Soderblom says after seeing the film, which opened yesterday.Sure, not all radio astronomers look like Jodie Foster. Yeah, the computers don't normally look that good or work that fast. And the movie plays up scientific rivalries that are a little outdated.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1998
Naming a school is anything but elementary.The choice should stand out, but not too far. Make a statement, but not too bold. Be unique in an ordinary way.With the state of Maryland ladling out buckets of school construction money over the last four years and more than 20 schools in the planning pipeline, there will be a lot of scrambling in communities to come up with the perfect combination of words that mean everything - and nothing.Principals of new schools say few issues generate such intense community feelings.
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER and MIKE BOWLER,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
Is YOUR BRAIN suffering information Overload? Can't remember a darn thing? Forget it, says Pierce J. Howard, an organizational Psychologist in Charlotte, N. C. You're just tired. Take a short nap or a walk around the block, Your brain capacity is about 10 million books of a thousand pages each. "This outrageous capacity mandates humility," says Howard, who has written a book on brain research and its application to everyday life. "The Owner's Manual for the Brain" (Bard Press, 831 pages, $34.95)
NEWS
By Salim Muwakkil | September 1, 1999
CARL SAGAN, the late astronomer and prolific author, once wrote a pseudonymous essay touting marijuana as a stimulus to his intellectual work.In fact, according to an article by his biographer in the Aug. 22 San Francisco Examiner magazine, Sagan was an avid pot smoker for most of his life.Not surprisingly, news of the influential astronomer's smoking choice had to hide under a pseudonym or wait until his death, lest he suffer America's puritanical wrath.It's the same wrath currently being ducked by George W. Bush, as he refuses to answer questions about his "rebellious" youth.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1998
Naming a school is anything but elementary.The choice should stand out, but not too far. Make a statement, but not too bold. Be unique in an ordinary way.With the state of Maryland ladling out buckets of school construction money over the last four years and more than 20 schools in the planning pipeline, there will be a lot of scrambling in communities to come up with the perfect combination of words that mean everything - and nothing.Principals of new schools say few issues generate such intense community feelings.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1997
With NASA's 6-ton Cassini spacecraft cleared for launch tomorrow on a 6 1/2 -year voyage to Saturn, space agency scientists and anti-nuclear activists have converged on Cape Canaveral, Fla., with their fingers crossed.The NASA folks are hoping the $3.4 billion mission will lift off without a hugely expensive scientific failure.Nuclear protesters, meanwhile, are praying that Cassini's electric generators, powered by 72 pounds of plutonium, will not be blown apart in a launch accident that showers radiation over Central Florida, or vaporized later in a fiery re-entry that poisons the atmosphere and puts hundreds of thousands of lives in danger.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1997
Take it from the stargazer's mouth: "Contact" pretty much gets things right.The thrill of the hunt, the dedication, the basic scientific principles, the enormous odds researchers battle, looking for radio waves of extra-terrestrial origin -- all that's there, Hubble scientist David Soderblom says after seeing the film, which opened yesterday.Sure, not all radio astronomers look like Jodie Foster. Yeah, the computers don't normally look that good or work that fast. And the movie plays up scientific rivalries that are a little outdated.
NEWS
March 20, 1997
Ralph Santiago Abascal, 62, general counsel of California Rural Legal Assistance and one of the state's foremost lawyers for the poor, died Monday of cancer in Berkeley, Calif. In nearly 30 years as a legal services lawyer, he worked on more than 200 lawsuits, including those that maintained Medi-Cal abortions forpoor women, preserved a workplace safety inspection program and expanded state restrictions on discharge of toxic chemicals.Bill Bradley, 73, originator of the "Gypsy Robe" tradition that has been a symbol of good luck through decades of Broadway productions, died Monday in New York from complications after a stroke.
FEATURES
By David L. Chandler and David L. Chandler,Boston Globe | December 29, 1994
It was the stars, twinkling in the sky above Brooklyn where he grew up, that fired Carl Sagan's imagination when he was only 5 and started him on a course from which he has never wavered: to understand the heavens and to share the excitement of discovery with others.The stars, Mr. Sagan said recently in an interview, "were clearly different from the rest of my environment, but when I asked people what they were, nobody knew."When I found out the stunning, stunning answer -- that the stars were suns, but so far away that they just appeared as these pale flickers of light -- the universe opened up to me. The scale, the immensity.
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER and MIKE BOWLER,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
Is YOUR BRAIN suffering information Overload? Can't remember a darn thing? Forget it, says Pierce J. Howard, an organizational Psychologist in Charlotte, N. C. You're just tired. Take a short nap or a walk around the block, Your brain capacity is about 10 million books of a thousand pages each. "This outrageous capacity mandates humility," says Howard, who has written a book on brain research and its application to everyday life. "The Owner's Manual for the Brain" (Bard Press, 831 pages, $34.95)
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1997
On a scale between infinite space and infinitesimal particles dwell creatures called humans. They are drops in the cosmic well. But despite their paltry insignificance in the great scheme of things, these beings are so wondrous that they can take us from universe to quark in a mere 35 minutes.That is the journey we undertake in "Cosmic Voyage," the new IMAX film playing at the Maryland Science Center as part of its "To the Stars" theme in this Baltimore bicentennial. Writer, director and producer Bayley Silleck makes us feel tiny in his depictions of the vastness of the cosmos, but he also exhilarates with this vision of our mysterious beginnings and our place in the universe.
NEWS
December 28, 1996
WHEN THE robotic probe Mars Pathfinder touches down on the Red Planet on Independence Day, take a moment to remember Carl Sagan. As much as any scientist, Dr. Sagan was responsible for the public support needed to fund expensive space explorations. He did it by taking science to the people.Dr. Sagan didn't talk about the origins of the universe or the possibility of life on another planet just with scientists. He used television to spread his excitement to mass audiences, appearing on "The Tonight Show" 26 times.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.