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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1998
The 2000 Year Old Man, on how this millennium compares to the last: "This is much better, much better, because people are free, they're sexually liberated. In the first one, they said, 'Don't you dare touch that.' And now they say, 'Touch it, touch it, touch it.' I am so happy to be able to fool around. And in the first millennium, did they have a thing called Viagra? Well, they've got it now, and I'm hanging my hat on it. Things are looking very good." For a couple of guys working off the tops of their heads, Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner have done all right for themselves.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
By now you probably know that comedian Sid Caesar died today at the age of 91. But judging by the paper-thin pieces I have been seeing on the web this afternoon, I am guessing many readers might not understand how seminal he was to the history of television and sketch comedy. Caesar deserves some cultural context and honor for the fearless and pioneering figure he was. Live television burned him up within a decade, leaving behind a guy addicted to amphetamines, downers and alcohol.
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By DONNA RIFKIND and DONNA RIFKIND,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2006
The Amalgamation Polka Stephen Wright NNNNN Carl Reiner Simon & Schuster / 224 pages / $21 As an actor, television writer and film director, Carl Reiner is a national treasure, and there is nothing to be gained by treating him with any hint of disrespect. However, having written something new that bears several dubious resemblances to a novel, he presumes a little more fortitude than an admiring reader is able to muster. NNNNN purports to tell the story of Nat Noland, a best-selling writer whose latest project is a reworking of the Cain and Abel story.
NEWS
November 29, 2007
MEL TOLKIN, 94 Comedy writer Mel Tolkin, the head writer for Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows, which defined the art of sketch comedy during early television, died Monday of heart failure at his Century City home, said his son, writer-director Michael Tolkin. Mr. Tolkin spent nearly a half-century in show business, beginning in the 1930s when he wrote revues and played piano in Montreal jazz clubs. He wrote comedy for Bob Hope, Jerry Lewis, Danny Kaye and Danny Thomas, and in the 1970s was a writer and editor for All in the Family.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | May 26, 1995
He's a nice Jewish boy from the Bronx who wants to be an actor, even though he can't act.His parents want him to be a druggist, his boss wants him to be on time and his girlfriend just wants him.These are just a few of the challenges the main character, David Kolowitz, faces in pursuit of his dreams in the play "Enter Laughing."The Columbia Community Players will present "Enter Laughing," the final production of its all-comedy lineup for the season, at 8 p.m. today and tomorrow and June 2 and 3 at Slayton House in Columbia.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 29, 1990
KIRSTIE ALLEY should make it from television to the big screen as long as she sticks to comedy. She's very good at it. She is particularly good at in ''Sibling Rivalry,'' a new comedy that was directed by Carl Reiner.Reiner, who didn't do too well with his last few films, is back on top with this one. It's funny throughout. Some of us might have preferred a different ending, but the ending Reiner does use is certainly good enough.Alley plays a neglected wife, married eight years to a doctor who pays her little mind.
NEWS
November 29, 2007
MEL TOLKIN, 94 Comedy writer Mel Tolkin, the head writer for Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows, which defined the art of sketch comedy during early television, died Monday of heart failure at his Century City home, said his son, writer-director Michael Tolkin. Mr. Tolkin spent nearly a half-century in show business, beginning in the 1930s when he wrote revues and played piano in Montreal jazz clubs. He wrote comedy for Bob Hope, Jerry Lewis, Danny Kaye and Danny Thomas, and in the 1970s was a writer and editor for All in the Family.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 10, 2003
If you don't like dogs, you won't like Good Boy!, or the things it implies. That includes, first and foremost, the notion that dogs alone make life bearable. Without them, in the world according to this lighthearted little charmer from the Henson studios, people just wouldn't know what to do with themselves. If you're a dog person, of course, this movie will only state the obvious, and you'll probably love it for that very reason (and the simple fact that we never get enough talking-dog movies)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1995
How did Carl Reiner manage an Emmy nomination for a role he created more than 30 years ago? Check out tonight's "Mad About You" rerun, which salutes one of TV's funniest shows ever.* "Mad About You" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Last season's cleverest single episode returns with Carl Reiner guest starring as Alan Brady. Remember? That's the fictional character he played on "The Dick Van Dyke Show" (1961-1966), and this episode imagines Brady was real, as Paul (Paul Reiser) asks the aging "star" to do a documentary on the history of TV. Mr. Reiner is up for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy for the guest spot.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | December 20, 1992
What better way to celebrate a really big holiday than with a really big shew?Bob Newhart takes time out from his CBS series, "Bob," to emcee the two-hour special, "Holiday Greetings From 'The Ed Sullivan Show' " tonight. Mr. Newhart is no stranger to "The Ed Sullivan Show," having appeared on it numerous times."Holiday Greetings" is the third in a series of retrospectives of the memorable CBS variety series, which aired from 1948 to 1971. The first two drew large audiences. The latest special mixes new performances with old clips.
NEWS
By DONNA RIFKIND and DONNA RIFKIND,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2006
The Amalgamation Polka Stephen Wright NNNNN Carl Reiner Simon & Schuster / 224 pages / $21 As an actor, television writer and film director, Carl Reiner is a national treasure, and there is nothing to be gained by treating him with any hint of disrespect. However, having written something new that bears several dubious resemblances to a novel, he presumes a little more fortitude than an admiring reader is able to muster. NNNNN purports to tell the story of Nat Noland, a best-selling writer whose latest project is a reworking of the Cain and Abel story.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 10, 2003
If you don't like dogs, you won't like Good Boy!, or the things it implies. That includes, first and foremost, the notion that dogs alone make life bearable. Without them, in the world according to this lighthearted little charmer from the Henson studios, people just wouldn't know what to do with themselves. If you're a dog person, of course, this movie will only state the obvious, and you'll probably love it for that very reason (and the simple fact that we never get enough talking-dog movies)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1998
The 2000 Year Old Man, on how this millennium compares to the last: "This is much better, much better, because people are free, they're sexually liberated. In the first one, they said, 'Don't you dare touch that.' And now they say, 'Touch it, touch it, touch it.' I am so happy to be able to fool around. And in the first millennium, did they have a thing called Viagra? Well, they've got it now, and I'm hanging my hat on it. Things are looking very good." For a couple of guys working off the tops of their heads, Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner have done all right for themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Coffren | June 18, 1998
Island festivalEnjoy a vacation to the islands without ever leaving the country at the free Caribbean Festival on Sunday at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Art Museum Drive, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Swing and sway to calypso music as a parade of costumed dancers floats by, sample spicy island delicacies or listen to the rhythm of the steel drum band. Call 410-396-6314.Funny bonesTake your medicine, a double dose of laughs administered by legendary comic greats Carl Reiner (below right) and Mel Brooks, "The Knights of Comedy," Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Lyric, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave . Reiner won seven Emmys as the creator of "The Dick Van Dyke Show," and Brooks directed such comedy classics as "Young Frankenstein" and "Blazing Saddles."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 4, 1997
There's about 64 minutes of slam-bang comedy, hot, fresh, snappy and just the way you like it, lost in the great sluggish tide that is the almost endless "That Old Feeling." That old feeling is fatigue.Yet this is one of those curious films far more interesting for what it says than for what it is. What it is is mediocre comedy. What it says is, Let the spirit of Dionysian fury liberate you. Escape the tyranny of evil white Republicans. Hooray for our team!Bette Midler -- in fine form -- and Dennis Farina -- gray-haired guy, very macho, usually plays cops and was a cop -- are a long-divorced couple.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
UPN continues getting the jump on the competition, with premieres of two of its more popular returning series."The Sentinel" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- What happens when a guy with heightened senses of perception, a guy with eyes seemingly in back of, on top of and all around his head, fails? That's the issue tonight, as Ellison (Richard Burgi) uses his "sentinel" abilities to track down his captain, who's stranded in a Peruvian jungle. UPN."Star Trek: Voyager" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
UPN continues getting the jump on the competition, with premieres of two of its more popular returning series."The Sentinel" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- What happens when a guy with heightened senses of perception, a guy with eyes seemingly in back of, on top of and all around his head, fails? That's the issue tonight, as Ellison (Richard Burgi) uses his "sentinel" abilities to track down his captain, who's stranded in a Peruvian jungle. UPN."Star Trek: Voyager" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 26, 1990
'Sibling Rivalry'Starring Kirstie Alley.Directed by Carl Reiner.Released by Castle Rock.PG-13.**There's a delirious moment in "Sibling Rivalry" that conjures up an even more delirious moment on a recent "Saturday Night Live" where guest host Woody Harrelson and regular sex object Victoria Jackson took part in a game show called "Who's Dumber?" (It was Woosy, by a splinter).In the "Sibling Rivalry" variant, Kirstie Alley as a married woman whose first-time lover has just died in their love nest, and Bill Pullman, as a Venetian blind salesman who thinks he's killed the poor schlub (Sam Elliott as the hapless corpse)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1995
How did Carl Reiner manage an Emmy nomination for a role he created more than 30 years ago? Check out tonight's "Mad About You" rerun, which salutes one of TV's funniest shows ever.* "Mad About You" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Last season's cleverest single episode returns with Carl Reiner guest starring as Alan Brady. Remember? That's the fictional character he played on "The Dick Van Dyke Show" (1961-1966), and this episode imagines Brady was real, as Paul (Paul Reiser) asks the aging "star" to do a documentary on the history of TV. Mr. Reiner is up for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy for the guest spot.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | May 26, 1995
He's a nice Jewish boy from the Bronx who wants to be an actor, even though he can't act.His parents want him to be a druggist, his boss wants him to be on time and his girlfriend just wants him.These are just a few of the challenges the main character, David Kolowitz, faces in pursuit of his dreams in the play "Enter Laughing."The Columbia Community Players will present "Enter Laughing," the final production of its all-comedy lineup for the season, at 8 p.m. today and tomorrow and June 2 and 3 at Slayton House in Columbia.
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