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By William C. Rhoden and William C. Rhoden,New York Times News Service | March 1, 1992
Who is Carl Lewis, really?Is he the comet with the flattop haircut? Or the high-flying meteor with a ponytail and dreadlocks?The other night, Lewis' head was shaved bald."
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By DAVID STEELE | December 3, 2008
This one's pretty easy to deduce, even though it's a shame to have to diminish one person's accomplishments to elevate another's. Nevertheless ... If Cal Ripken Jr. had done what he did in the same year Michael Phelps won his eight Olympic gold medals, who would earn the SI Sportsman of the Year honors? The answer is as simple as the answer to this: Which is bigger, major league baseball or the Olympics? There is no grander stage than the Olympics, and doing what Phelps did on that stage, against the best in his sport, with the eyes of the world on him, eclipses even Ripken's record.
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NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Staff writer | July 28, 1991
Hurdler Moses Lewis doesn't hesitate for a second when asked to namehis favorite track star.The 11-year-old has eyes -- and ears -- only for Carl Lewis, the star of the 1988 Olympics. The two aren't related, but Moses soaks up words of wisdom from the elder Lewis as he would from an older brother."When he talks about thinking it's his race, I think of the hurdles as my race," said Moses, who is competing this weekend at The Athletics Congress Junior National Championships in Chapel Hill, N.C.A member of the Harford County Gliders track club, the Edgewood youngster devours every book and tidbit of advice by the Olympic gold medalist he can find.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | August 3, 1996
ATLANTA -- Let's hope he drops the baton.Or better yet, gets caught from behind.It's not rooting against the United States.It's rooting against Nike and NBC and all the revolting self-interest that is ruining sports.No one knows if Carl Lewis will anchor the U.S. 400-meter relay team tonight, but take it as a given.Asked to assess the chances of Lewis running, U.S. sprinter Jeff Williams said, "What are the chances of the sun coming up?"U.S. assistant track coach Charlie Greene pondered the possibility of an eclipse last night, then conceded that the sun indeed would rise again.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | December 3, 2008
This one's pretty easy to deduce, even though it's a shame to have to diminish one person's accomplishments to elevate another's. Nevertheless ... If Cal Ripken Jr. had done what he did in the same year Michael Phelps won his eight Olympic gold medals, who would earn the SI Sportsman of the Year honors? The answer is as simple as the answer to this: Which is bigger, major league baseball or the Olympics? There is no grander stage than the Olympics, and doing what Phelps did on that stage, against the best in his sport, with the eyes of the world on him, eclipses even Ripken's record.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1996
ATLANTA -- The U.S. Olympic track and field trials accidentally introduced a new demonstration sport here yesterday: the full-contact long jump. Or was that the hammer-jump?It happened while the long jumpers, including Carl Lewis, were warming up and the hammer throwers were in the midst of their qualifying competition. Brian Murer threw the 16-pound hammer clear across the long jump runway. Ken Norlan threw one that landed within 10 feet of Lewis."I just hooked it a little," Murer joked later.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | June 29, 1992
NEW ORLEANS -- Carl Lewis walked away from the finish, his eyes searching the stands. Ahead of him, others were celebrating personal triumphs, waving American flags and pumping fists in the air.Lewis was alone. He had lost. An era had ended.Last night, in a stadium drenched with humidity and emotion, the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials closed one of the most eagerly anticipated races of the year -- the men's 200-meter final.But it was new star Michael Johnson, who finished first in 19.79 seconds, fourth fastest in history.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | August 3, 1996
ATLANTA -- Let's hope he drops the baton.Or better yet, gets caught from behind.It's not rooting against the United States.It's rooting against Nike and NBC and all the revolting self-interest that is ruining sports.No one knows if Carl Lewis will anchor the U.S. 400-meter relay team tonight, but take it as a given.Asked to assess the chances of Lewis running, U.S. sprinter Jeff Williams said, "What are the chances of the sun coming up?"U.S. assistant track coach Charlie Greene pondered the possibility of an eclipse last night, then conceded that the sun indeed would rise again.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 3, 1996
With the Olympics almost over, now might be a good time for some reflections and observations about the Games. I'll start with a controversial subject that has caused much debate the past few days.Should Carl Lewis be awarded a spot on the U.S. Olympic 4 x 100-meter relay team so he can have a shot at earning a record-setting 10th gold medal?Does Donald Trump eat Spam?On Wednesday the incomparable Lewis -- no spring chicken at 35 -- did the seemingly impossible, surging from behind to capture his fourth Olympic gold medal in the long jump.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | July 30, 1996
ATLANTA -- The victory lap took forever, or about as long as Carl Lewis' career.Michael Johnson set an Olympic record last night, but his coronation had to wait.King Carl wouldn't vacate the throne.He won his ninth Olympic gold medal and four straight in the long jump, further cementing his place in track and field history.Johnson probably couldn't believe it.On the night he took the first step toward completing his unprecedented double in the 200 and 400 meters, Lewis stole the show.Two magnificent athletes, U.S. teammates reaching new pinnacles.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | August 3, 1996
We'll know later tonight whether Carl Lewis will get his 10th official gold medal, which would be an Olympic record, but whether he does or not, Lewis already has copped the award for these Games for the most shameless manipulation of the media.After winning a surprise gold earlier this week in the long jump, Lewis immediately began a disingenuous campaign to get onto the 4x100 meter relay team tonight, in spite of the fact that he ran last in the Olympic trials and wouldn't participate in a pre-Olympic camp.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 3, 1996
With the Olympics almost over, now might be a good time for some reflections and observations about the Games. I'll start with a controversial subject that has caused much debate the past few days.Should Carl Lewis be awarded a spot on the U.S. Olympic 4 x 100-meter relay team so he can have a shot at earning a record-setting 10th gold medal?Does Donald Trump eat Spam?On Wednesday the incomparable Lewis -- no spring chicken at 35 -- did the seemingly impossible, surging from behind to capture his fourth Olympic gold medal in the long jump.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | July 31, 1996
ATLANTA -- Next, Carl Lewis will want to play for the Orioles.He'd fit right in, considering his campaign for the anchor spot on the U.S. men's 4 x 100-meter relay team, a campaign to satisfy a personal goal at the possible expense of his team.If Lewis were a hitter, he'd refuse to DH.If he were a pitcher, he'd refuse to work on short rest.Alas, he's a sprinter -- or, shall we say, a former sprinter.And sprinters have agendas, too.Michael Johnson sounded petty when he criticized Lewis' refusal to step down as the leading figure in U.S. track and field, but this is exactly what he was talking about.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | July 30, 1996
ATLANTA -- The victory lap took forever, or about as long as Carl Lewis' career.Michael Johnson set an Olympic record last night, but his coronation had to wait.King Carl wouldn't vacate the throne.He won his ninth Olympic gold medal and four straight in the long jump, further cementing his place in track and field history.Johnson probably couldn't believe it.On the night he took the first step toward completing his unprecedented double in the 200 and 400 meters, Lewis stole the show.Two magnificent athletes, U.S. teammates reaching new pinnacles.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1996
ATLANTA -- The U.S. Olympic track and field trials accidentally introduced a new demonstration sport here yesterday: the full-contact long jump. Or was that the hammer-jump?It happened while the long jumpers, including Carl Lewis, were warming up and the hammer throwers were in the midst of their qualifying competition. Brian Murer threw the 16-pound hammer clear across the long jump runway. Ken Norlan threw one that landed within 10 feet of Lewis."I just hooked it a little," Murer joked later.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | August 16, 1994
Reading Time: Two Minutes.If and when Jim Speros of the Blue and Silvers on 33rd Street finally comes up with a good equine name for his team, will he have to clear it with the New York-based Jockey Club?* What the Riddick Bowe fight proved beyond a shadow of a doubt the other night is that what happens in the ring is of little consequence. It's what's outside that counts. Calling a fight a "no contest" after Bowe KO'd Buster Mathis Jr. as he was kneeling on the floor is absolutely unconscionable and the New Jersey Boxing Commission head, Larry (Hap)
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | July 31, 1996
ATLANTA -- Next, Carl Lewis will want to play for the Orioles.He'd fit right in, considering his campaign for the anchor spot on the U.S. men's 4 x 100-meter relay team, a campaign to satisfy a personal goal at the possible expense of his team.If Lewis were a hitter, he'd refuse to DH.If he were a pitcher, he'd refuse to work on short rest.Alas, he's a sprinter -- or, shall we say, a former sprinter.And sprinters have agendas, too.Michael Johnson sounded petty when he criticized Lewis' refusal to step down as the leading figure in U.S. track and field, but this is exactly what he was talking about.
SPORTS
By Gil Lebreton and Gil Lebreton,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | August 13, 1993
The greatest track and field meet in the world begins today, and I dare you to find it."This is the one," Carl Lewis, holder of nine Olympic medals, was saying the other day. "This is the party."As in all good parties, you need only check the guest list of the fourth World Track and Field Championships Lewis, Sergei Bubka, Baylor's Michael Johnson,Heike Drechsler and dozens of assorted Ivans and Tatianas.But so goes the allure of the Worlds. No athlete who qualifies dares skip off to Prague to race for a bag of marks and two nights at the Hyatt.
SPORTS
By Gil Lebreton and Gil Lebreton,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | August 13, 1993
The greatest track and field meet in the world begins today, and I dare you to find it."This is the one," Carl Lewis, holder of nine Olympic medals, was saying the other day. "This is the party."As in all good parties, you need only check the guest list of the fourth World Track and Field Championships Lewis, Sergei Bubka, Baylor's Michael Johnson,Heike Drechsler and dozens of assorted Ivans and Tatianas.But so goes the allure of the Worlds. No athlete who qualifies dares skip off to Prague to race for a bag of marks and two nights at the Hyatt.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 8, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Carl Lewis anchors the 4 x 100 relay today, and if no one drops a baton, and if Sergei Bubka doesn't fall from the sky, Lewis will win his eighth gold medal. For anyone else, eight golds would be a small miracle. For Lewis, they're what we expect.It should be his last Olympic gold, except who's to say what Carl Lewis might do. As Lewis has said, "I don't put limits on myself."If he is 31, already ancient by the standards of his sport, he still dominates the game. Watch the crowd whenever he enters the stadium.
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