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By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | June 4, 2008
No presidential campaign season is complete until the media create, and voters adopt, convenient caricatures for the candidates that reduce the presidential nominees to simplified and typically distorted versions of their true selves. To see how insidiously easy this process is, notice how a few controversial personal relationships, certain aspects of his identity, and statements he or his wife made have been selectively combined to depict Sen. Barack Obama as an unpatriotic, religiously suspect and culturally arrogant appeaser of global bullies.
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NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | June 4, 2008
No presidential campaign season is complete until the media create, and voters adopt, convenient caricatures for the candidates that reduce the presidential nominees to simplified and typically distorted versions of their true selves. To see how insidiously easy this process is, notice how a few controversial personal relationships, certain aspects of his identity, and statements he or his wife made have been selectively combined to depict Sen. Barack Obama as an unpatriotic, religiously suspect and culturally arrogant appeaser of global bullies.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | June 2, 1998
"He was the most influential critic we have had in this country in terms of his promotion of the arts and liberating them from censorship." That's H. L. Mencken, the sage of Baltimore, as described by John Daniel Reaves, who will play the great journalist four times this coming week at Washington's National Portrait Gallery.Reaves will give his one-man play, called "H.L. Mencken, One More Time," in conjunction with the portrait gallery's exhibition "Celebrity Caricatures in America."It's a collection of more than 200 caricatures of such people as Babe Ruth, Elsa Maxwell, George Gershwin, Al Smith and the Marx Brothers, by such people as Miguel Covarrubias, Marius de Zayas, Alfred Frueh, James Montgomery Flagg and Will Cotton.
FEATURES
August 7, 2006
Art Lesson Drawing caricatures FYI Kevin Cowherd is on as signment. His column does not appear today.
FEATURES
August 7, 2006
Art Lesson Drawing caricatures FYI Kevin Cowherd is on as signment. His column does not appear today.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 2006
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- Three people died yesterday during violent protests in two cities over caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad published in Western newspapers. Demonstrators continued to ransack foreign companies across Pakistan as the death toll in protests this week rose to five. Authorities said two people died yesterday in Peshawar and one in Lahore. Caricatures mocking Muhammad were originally printed in a Danish newspaper in September. The cartoons were reprinted in several Western countries by publications whose editors said they were defending freedom of the press.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
Micki Mez's clay caricatures create laughsJust by the name, you'd expect Micki Mez to have a sense of humor.She doesn't disappoint -- and neither do her "caricatures in clay."Whether they're wearing a wry smile or quizzical scowl, eyeglasses or plaid shirts, the witty pieces reveal both the talent and personality of the artist."I never wanted my house to be grown-up serious. This was always my way of resisting that," says the 41-year-old mother of two.When she had filled the tabletops of her Owings Mills home, Ms. Mez decided it was time to get serious.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 27, 2004
Wreckage Begins with "W," by Jeff Danziger. Steerforth Press. 384 pages. $16.95. Among political cartoonists widely published in the United States (including occasionally in The Sun), Jeff Danziger stands out as extraordinarily critical of military intervention in general and President George W. Bush in particular. This collection of a selection of his drawings from February 1999 to March 2004 is a fugue of those two themes. If you are a W enthusiast who is stirred by the righteousness of U.S. involvement in Iraq, don't buy this.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 4, 2005
Jarhead's title is slang for Marine. Anthony Swofford, or "Swoff" (Jake Gyllenhaal), tells us in the voiceover that it may derive from the "tight, high" Corps haircut and may mean that if you lift the lid of hair you find an empty jar. In this movie, that's a certainty. Jarhead might as well have been called Jughead. It's about what happens to normally messed-up American boys if you egg them on toward a testosterone-fueled insanity that only brutality can control. The setting is the first Gulf War. In that statement lies part of the problem.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | January 23, 2003
AL HIRSCHFELD knew Baltimore - and loved it. The feeling was mutual. Mr. Hirschfeld, the legendary theatrical caricaturist and chronicler who died Monday at 99, came to Baltimore for decades to see pre-Broadway tryouts. He would sit in the darkened theater and sketch on 8-by-10-inch notebooks, then return to his Upper East Side townhouse in New York and turn his "hieroglyphics" into the astonishing, lithe and sparkling drawings that captured not only the personalities of the performers but the spirit of the shows.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 2006
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- Three people died yesterday during violent protests in two cities over caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad published in Western newspapers. Demonstrators continued to ransack foreign companies across Pakistan as the death toll in protests this week rose to five. Authorities said two people died yesterday in Peshawar and one in Lahore. Caricatures mocking Muhammad were originally printed in a Danish newspaper in September. The cartoons were reprinted in several Western countries by publications whose editors said they were defending freedom of the press.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 4, 2005
Jarhead's title is slang for Marine. Anthony Swofford, or "Swoff" (Jake Gyllenhaal), tells us in the voiceover that it may derive from the "tight, high" Corps haircut and may mean that if you lift the lid of hair you find an empty jar. In this movie, that's a certainty. Jarhead might as well have been called Jughead. It's about what happens to normally messed-up American boys if you egg them on toward a testosterone-fueled insanity that only brutality can control. The setting is the first Gulf War. In that statement lies part of the problem.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | July 15, 2005
WASHINGTON - Mexico and the United States have many more important things to worry about than the cuteness or offensiveness of Memin Pinguin. The big-lipped, big-eared, bug-eyed, black-skinned pickaninny cartoon character recently sparked international outrage when it popped up on Mexican postage stamps. It was the biggest uproar between the two nations since, well, the last one. That, you may recall, came when Mexico's President Vicente Fox said that Mexicans take jobs that "not even blacks want to do."
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
Diners at McCafferty's used to stop in their tracks to stare at helmets and jerseys signed by former Baltimore Colts greats who played for the restaurant owner's father, Don McCafferty Sr. But visitors to the site of the former Mount Washington institution are now halted by yellow police tape put in place by the Internal Revenue Service, which recently seized the restaurant's assets - everything from kitchen equipment to 180 caricatures of prominent Maryland...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 27, 2004
Wreckage Begins with "W," by Jeff Danziger. Steerforth Press. 384 pages. $16.95. Among political cartoonists widely published in the United States (including occasionally in The Sun), Jeff Danziger stands out as extraordinarily critical of military intervention in general and President George W. Bush in particular. This collection of a selection of his drawings from February 1999 to March 2004 is a fugue of those two themes. If you are a W enthusiast who is stirred by the righteousness of U.S. involvement in Iraq, don't buy this.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2004
It's just so different from what we typically show," said curator Amy Hunt of printmaker Red Grooms' pieces, now on display through July 3 at the decidedly traditional Washington County Museum of Fine Arts. "They aren't landscapes; they're not portraits," she said. But these 20 works most definitely are, as Hunt described, "caricatures of reality." Grooms, a 60-something guy educated at the Art Institute of Chicago and the New School of Social Research in New York, creates each crowded and vibrant piece as a public or private snapshot of modern society.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
Diners at McCafferty's used to stop in their tracks to stare at helmets and jerseys signed by former Baltimore Colts greats who played for the restaurant owner's father, Don McCafferty Sr. But visitors to the site of the former Mount Washington institution are now halted by yellow police tape put in place by the Internal Revenue Service, which recently seized the restaurant's assets - everything from kitchen equipment to 180 caricatures of prominent Maryland...
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | June 7, 1991
"There'll always be an England," is how New Yorker magazine tags certain quaint column-ending fillers, a droll reference to the island nation's peculiar habits. Cable viewers could say the same about "The Secret Policeman's Biggest Ball," an oddly engaging comedy special on the Arts & Entertainment basic service tonight (at 10 o'clock).The show is an hour-long collection of excerpts from a comedy fund-raiser at London's Dominion Theatre, which raised money for Amnesty International in the manner that America's "Comic Relief" raises funds to fight homelessness.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | January 23, 2003
AL HIRSCHFELD knew Baltimore - and loved it. The feeling was mutual. Mr. Hirschfeld, the legendary theatrical caricaturist and chronicler who died Monday at 99, came to Baltimore for decades to see pre-Broadway tryouts. He would sit in the darkened theater and sketch on 8-by-10-inch notebooks, then return to his Upper East Side townhouse in New York and turn his "hieroglyphics" into the astonishing, lithe and sparkling drawings that captured not only the personalities of the performers but the spirit of the shows.
FEATURES
By John M. Glionna and Abigail Goldman and John M. Glionna and Abigail Goldman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2002
Amid mounting protests, college clothier Abercrombie & Fitch has pulled a line of T-shirts from stores nationwide following complaints that they depicted racist caricatures of Asian-Americans. The $25 T-shirts show cartoonish Asian characters with slanted eyes and conical hats as pitchmen for fabricated companies such as restaurants, dry cleaners and bowling alleys. One portrays a man pulling a rickshaw with the words "Rick Shaw's Hoagies and Grinders. Order by the foot. Good meat. Quick feet."
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