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NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | September 30, 1990
CHRISTIANSTED, Virgin Islands -- The license plates and travel brochures describe the U.S. Virgin Islands as "America's Paradise."But there's sewage in paradise, and too much trash. The lush hillsides are freckled by condos and vacation homes. Reefs are being killed by soil washed into the ocean from development sites. And a molasseslike goo, pumped from a rum distillery into the aqua waters, forms what appears to be a permanent oil slick.Puerto Rico suffers from a Dr. Jekyll-Mr. Hyde personality.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - The scene played out on a sun-soaked afternoon at Ed Smith Stadium last week with Orioles manager Buck Showalter watching intently and chuckling. Atlanta Braves budding superstar shortstop Andrelton Simmons was on second base, trying to get the attention of Orioles rookie infielder Jonathan Schoop. Simmons was hoping to mess with the kid, distract him, make him laugh. But Schoop, who had spent several minutes before the game chatting with Simmons, wanted no parts of the potential frivolity.
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NEWS
August 19, 1991
* Agnes: June 19-29, 1972; Florida to New York; 118 dead; $4.7 billion damage.* Fifi: Sept. 19-20, 1974; Honduras; 2,000 dead.Eloise: Sept. 13-27, 1975; Caribbean and northeastern United States; 71 dead.David: Aug. 30 to Sept. 13, 1979; Dominican Republic, Dominica and Florida, 1,200 dead. Frederic, Bahamas, Alabama and Mississippi; seven dead; $2.5 billion damage.* Allen: Aug. 4-11, 1980; Caribbean and Texas; 272 dead.* Juan: Oct. 26 to Nov. 6, 1985; Southeast U.S.; 97 dead.Gilbert: Sept.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Tropical Storm Erin has formed just west of the Cape Verde Islands and is forecast to strengthen as it moves across the Atlantic, at least for a couple of days. The storm was moving at about 15 mph to the west-northwest, with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph, as of about 11 a.m. Thursday, according to the National Hurricane Center. And it is forecast to move into conditions favorable for it to intensify, with moist air and low wind shear, when varying wind speeds at different altitudes, inhibiting storm development.
FEATURES
By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 5, 1991
Willemstad, Curacao--It simply doesn't look like a Caribbean island.Caribbean islands are supposed to be lush and green from tropical rains. This one's dry and has more cactuses than palm trees.Caribbean islands are supposed to be lined with gorgeous beaches. Curacao has a few lovely sandy coves, but much of its shore is rocky.Caribbean islands are supposed to have quaint little huts fringing backwater harbors where native scows drop anchor. This one has pretty pastel-painted Dutch town houses and the harbor sees a lot more 1,000-passenger ocean liners than "Old Man and the Sea" fishing boats.
TRAVEL
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2005
A Memorable Place Island of Grenada steals the heart By Theresa G. Medoff SPECIAL TO THE SUN When I heard the news on the radio, I pulled over and sobbed. Hurricane Ivan had ripped across the lush, mountainous island of Grenada, destroying homes, schools, the parliament building and the nation's only hospital. I tried to imagine the devastation: 90 percent of buildings damaged or destroyed, the people homeless, the economy in tatters. At home later, I compared my vacation photos of the island's colorful harbor with the harbor I saw in news photos from last September - strewn with a jumble of wrecked boats, twisted metal and splintered wood torn from waterfront buildings.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2004
Could it happen here? The deadly tsunamis that crushed coastlines across Southeast Asia and Africa over the weekend might seem a world away. But researchers cautioned yesterday that the Atlantic Ocean is capable of spawning similarly deadly walls of water. "It's just a matter of time," says Harry Woodworth, a meteorologist in the Philadelphia office of the National Weather Service who studies Atlantic tsunamis. Although tsunamis are of more concern in Asia and the Pacific Rim, Woodworth says the deadly waves can occur anywhere that water is disturbed by an earthquake or other major geological event.
FEATURES
By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 8, 1991
BARBADOS -- You know it's Christmas in Barbados when you see snow on the mountain.Snow? In Barbados, the easternmost of the Caribbean islands?Not really. The "snow" that appears on some hills is really a blanket of white flowers that bloom at the same time as the Christmas poinsettias.It's a good thing they're only flowers and not real snow. Visitors come to Barbados at Christmas -- or any other time -- to enjoy the sun and a way of life that has a special twist.Barbados, which celebrates the 25th anniversary of its independence from Great Britain next month, is not simply a tropical island.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Tropical Storm Erin has formed just west of the Cape Verde Islands and is forecast to strengthen as it moves across the Atlantic, at least for a couple of days. The storm was moving at about 15 mph to the west-northwest, with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph, as of about 11 a.m. Thursday, according to the National Hurricane Center. And it is forecast to move into conditions favorable for it to intensify, with moist air and low wind shear, when varying wind speeds at different altitudes, inhibiting storm development.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | November 30, 1990
ORLANDO -- I am sitting by a fantasy lake at Walt Disney World trying to figure why so many people bother clinging to reality.The perfect aquamarine lake sits inside something called "Disney's Caribbean Beach Resort," which is supposed to be a replica of several Caribbean islands.Having been to several real Caribbean islands, however, I much prefer these fantasy ones. For one thing, everybody smiles at you here when they take your money and they often say, "Thank you."If this happens in the real Caribbean, I must have missed it. I don't wish to be an Ugly American, but if I wanted to deal with surly people who resented my presence, I wouldn't go on vacation.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
As 20 Harley-Davidsons growled across the asphalt at the Maryland Cruise terminal Monday morning, "Easy Rider" met "The Love Boat. " After a briefing from their tour leader, the bikers inched their machines up the ramp and into the yawning hold of the 2,200-passenger Enchantment of the Seas. Next stop: Labadee, a private port resort on the north coast of Haiti. Motorcycle cruising might be the ultimate surf-and-turf dream, a chance for bikers to ride off a passenger ship and onto sun-drenched Caribbean back roads.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Higgins and Michelle Higgins,New York Times News Service | January 21, 2007
More than a year ago, the federal government decided it was going to require just about everyone entering the United States to present a passport - even U.S. citizens coming back from trips just across the border. Confusion ensued - travel companies and border cities protested, start dates were pushed back, and air and sea requirements were broken up and put on different timetables. On Tuesday, the first of the requirements will be a reality. If you're jetting off to Mexico or the Caribbean, you'll need to pack a passport along with that bathing suit.
TRAVEL
By ROSEMARY MCCLURE and ROSEMARY MCCLURE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2006
My assignment: Go behind the scenes of a celebrity vacation. Test the waters, so to speak, of Anguilla, a 35-square-mile island in the eastern Caribbean that ranks high on the list of uber-chic superstar hideaways. I didn't object. Who would complain about a winter trip to the British West Indies? Besides, Anguilla (rhymes with vanilla) has been generating a lot of buzz: Town & Country magazine called it the "new luxury capital of the Caribbean"; VH1 named it "celebrity winter vacation destination of the year"; and Travel & Leisure readers laud it annually for having one of the top resorts in the Caribbean.
TRAVEL
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2005
A Memorable Place Island of Grenada steals the heart By Theresa G. Medoff SPECIAL TO THE SUN When I heard the news on the radio, I pulled over and sobbed. Hurricane Ivan had ripped across the lush, mountainous island of Grenada, destroying homes, schools, the parliament building and the nation's only hospital. I tried to imagine the devastation: 90 percent of buildings damaged or destroyed, the people homeless, the economy in tatters. At home later, I compared my vacation photos of the island's colorful harbor with the harbor I saw in news photos from last September - strewn with a jumble of wrecked boats, twisted metal and splintered wood torn from waterfront buildings.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2004
Could it happen here? The deadly tsunamis that crushed coastlines across Southeast Asia and Africa over the weekend might seem a world away. But researchers cautioned yesterday that the Atlantic Ocean is capable of spawning similarly deadly walls of water. "It's just a matter of time," says Harry Woodworth, a meteorologist in the Philadelphia office of the National Weather Service who studies Atlantic tsunamis. Although tsunamis are of more concern in Asia and the Pacific Rim, Woodworth says the deadly waves can occur anywhere that water is disturbed by an earthquake or other major geological event.
TRAVEL
By Reed Johnson and Reed Johnson,Los Angeles Times | February 15, 2004
For 62 years, the U.S. Navy's hulking presence kept Vieques, a Puerto Rican tropical idyll, frozen in a Cold War time warp. During those decades when the military used Vieques' beaches for bombing practice, this serenely beautiful, 21-mile-long island off Puerto Rico's east coast saw only a few thousand visitors a year, mostly harried urbanites seeking a respite from noisy, crowded San Juan. Paradoxically, the Navy preserved the beauty of Vieques for posterity. Now the Navy is gone, driven away by protests after a fighter jet missed its target and a stray bomb killed a local civilian in 1999.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Higgins and Michelle Higgins,New York Times News Service | January 21, 2007
More than a year ago, the federal government decided it was going to require just about everyone entering the United States to present a passport - even U.S. citizens coming back from trips just across the border. Confusion ensued - travel companies and border cities protested, start dates were pushed back, and air and sea requirements were broken up and put on different timetables. On Tuesday, the first of the requirements will be a reality. If you're jetting off to Mexico or the Caribbean, you'll need to pack a passport along with that bathing suit.
TRAVEL
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2000
The Sandy Lane Resort Hotel in Barbados has always been a celebrity kind of place. Elton John, Mick Jagger and Kevin Costner have stayed there. Aristotle Onassis strolled among the palm trees with Maria Callas. Members of British royalty have been guests there. The luxury hotel - known for its imposing white coral, private balconies and lush gardens overlooking the Caribbean Sea - has been a refuge for big spenders and tourists on a fling since opening in 1961. My husband and I got as close as the security fence.
TRAVEL
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2000
The Sandy Lane Resort Hotel in Barbados has always been a celebrity kind of place. Elton John, Mick Jagger and Kevin Costner have stayed there. Aristotle Onassis strolled among the palm trees with Maria Callas. Members of British royalty have been guests there. The luxury hotel - known for its imposing white coral, private balconies and lush gardens overlooking the Caribbean Sea - has been a refuge for big spenders and tourists on a fling since opening in 1961. My husband and I got as close as the security fence.
NEWS
By Victoria Burnett and Victoria Burnett,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 1998
JACMEL, Haiti -- Once, the streets of this Caribbean port pulsed with the incessant traffic of sailors and merchants. Its harbor was lined with ships loading mail, coffee, tobacco and indigo.Now, as it celebrates its 300th anniversary, the shabby but picturesque town 55 miles southwest of Port-au-Prince, the capital, is preparing for a possible renaissance. With its wide, sparkling bay and gingerbread houses, Jacmel has become the spearhead of a government drive to develop Haiti's tourist industry and revive the floundering economy.
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