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NEWS
December 1, 2011
As a local business owner, I was happy for the opportunity to participate in the recent public meeting to discuss the proposed Baltimore Washington Rail Facility. While I agree that it is incredibly important to continue this discussion openly, I hope residents of our community will not lose sight of how important this facility can be to our local economy. In addition to driving economic growth, providing additional tax income to our local governments, and creating jobs, as a business owner, I see an even more important benefit.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State officials have abandoned plans for a rail cargo facility in an economically depressed corner of West Baltimore, amid vocal opposition from residents and diminishing political will. With the state withdrawing more than $30 million in funding, the CSX Transportation facility envisioned for the city's Morrell Park neighborhood will not be built, Maryland Transportation Secretary James T. Smith said Thursday. CSX and the port of Baltimore had been counting on using the facility to help move additional cargo.
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BUSINESS
November 20, 2012
With the first three quarters of 2012 in the ledger, the Helen Delich Bentley Port of Baltimore appears poised to top several of last year's cargo records. Officials said that through the first nine months, the port's public and private terminals processed 30 million tons of general and bulk cargo volume, up 6 percent over the same period last year. The increase was led by autos, containerized goods, forest products and farm and construction equipment, which taken together amounted to 7.21 million tons, a 10 percent increase.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Northrop Grumman broke ground Monday on a 25,00-square-foot facility specializing in cargo bound for space, the latest expansion to Maryland's slowly growing space industry. The $20 million center near Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will be used to create and test space payloads and will feature a three-story, 6,000-square-foot clean room, a climate-controlled, air-locked facility where sensitive equipment can be made free of contaminants. That clean room will be the largest on the company's 129-acre campus in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 2005
WASHINGTON -- While airline passengers endure extensive and sometimes invasive security screening, the cargo in the hold is barely checked, a new federal report says. The report, issued yesterday by the Government Accountability Office, identifies significant vulnerabilities in the Department of Homeland Security's policies for guaranteeing the safety of the 23 billion pounds of commercial cargo shipped by air every year. The report was prepared at the request of five House members representing each party.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | November 10, 1994
Cargo handled by the port of Baltimore rose nearly 12 percent in this year's third quarter as the state-owned terminals stayed tTC on target for the best year since 1988.General cargo moving through the five public terminals in Baltimore increased to 1.53 million short tons in the most recent period from 1.37 million short tons in last year's third quarter, according to a report released yesterday by the Maryland Port Administration (MPA).The increase represented the ninth straight quarter of growth in cargo for the port of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | April 16, 2008
Cargo handled at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport -- and by U.S. airlines nationwide -- has slipped to its lowest level in at least four years, yet another tangible result of an ailing economy and skyrocketing fuel costs. The decrease is part of a general falloff in domestic cargo volume, whether by air, rail or truck, as consumers reduce spending and businesses ship fewer finished goods and buy less equipment and materials. Because cargo is a key barometer of economic health, a downturn could influence the Federal Reserve as it ponders whether to further cut interest rates to spur growth at a time when inflation pressures are rising.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
The Mediterranean Shipping Co. will increase by several thousand containers the cargo it moves through the port of Baltimore under an agreement announced yesterday with the Maryland Port Administration.The agreement gives the company special rates for cargo moved through the Seagirt Marine Terminal to and from southern and western destinations. The increased business in the port stems largely from improved rail service at the 2-year-old Seagirt terminal.Last year, the CSX Corp., one of two major railroads serving Baltimore, opened a rail yard at Seagirt as it closed its Potomac Yards facilities in Alexandria, Va. That will enable companies like Mediterranean to ship more cheaply by rail directly from the port, rather than trucking cargo first to Alexandria.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1995
Cargo handled by the Port of Baltimore rose nearly 17 percent last year -- its best showing since 1988.General cargo moving through the five public terminals in Baltimore jumped to 6.3 million short tons in 1994, or nearly 1 million more than in the previous year, according to a report released yesterday by the Maryland Port Administration.The increase represents the 10th straight quarter of cargo growth for the port, which has made a significant comeback after heavy volume losses in the 1980s and early 1990s.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1995
Cargo moving through the port of Baltimore increased 3 percent for the second half of 1994 as the weak dollar continued to spark a growth in exports.At the state's five public marine terminals, cargo rose to 3,237,548 short tons, or 85,213 short tons more than during the comparable period last year, the Maryland Port Administration said yesterday.A strong second quarter this year helped offset a slight loss in cargo during the first quarter. Exports have jumped more than 17 percent to 1,505,022 short tons.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, Kevin Rector and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
A nearly 120-year-old retaining wall that has troubled Charles Village residents for decades collapsed Wednesday amid a month's worth of rain, dumping street lights, sidewalks and half a dozen cars onto the CSX rail tracks below. No injuries were reported. City officials evacuated 19 adjacent homes along East 26th Street and urged residents to avoid the area in case of lingering instability. The landslide halted CSX rail traffic through what is a main artery to the port of Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
City and state officials are re-evaluating their approach to a proposed railroad cargo facility in Southwest Baltimore, acknowledging that their initial response to community concerns fell flat. The public backlash stalled the CSX Corp. project, which is nearly a year behind schedule, and created tension between local officials, who are collaborating on bringing a project considered critical to the port of Baltimore to fruition, according to interviews and internal email. "It's a difficult project.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
With a few legislative victories already in hand, Laurie Weishorn will sit down before the entire Baltimore delegation in Annapolis on Friday morning and ask them to go one step further and stop CSX Corp. from building a cargo transfer facility in her back yard. The hearing will be the biggest stage yet for the dogged objections from Weishorn and her blue-collar neighbors in Morrell Park, who say city, state and CSX rail officials underestimated their opposition to the project. "I think they thought they were going to slip it in on us, and we've proven to them that no, that isn't going to happen," Weishorn said Thursday, amid preparations for her Annapolis testimony.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The Maryland Air National Guard is set to lose its attack aircraft but should be getting its airlift capability back, officials said Tuesday. The Air Force is planning to give the state eight C-130J Super Hercules turboprops, the cargo planes that Maryland pilots used to transport troops and equipment in Iraq, Afghanistan and natural disasters in the United States until 2011. The planes are due to arrive in fiscal year 2018, when the guard is set to lose its A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Shippers already have begun diverting cargo from the port of Baltimore because of uncertainty about the ongoing labor contract standoff with the largest dockworkers union. The port is losing shipments despite assurances from labor and management officials that there won't be another strike or a lockout when a 90-day cooling-off period expires Friday. But there was no sign of a deal late Thursday, with labor representatives pushing for negotiations to continue and management saying their final offer is already on the table.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The Maryland Port Administration is urging state officials to approve its sale of a 346,0000-square-foot pier in the Canton Industrial Area. The Clinton Street Marine Terminal, which has seen little use for decades, sits across the Inner Harbor from Fort McHenry in the 1800 and 1900 blocks of S. Clinton Street, and has an appraised value between $2.5 million and $3.1 million, according to remarks on the intended sale before the Board of Public Works....
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | January 1, 1995
The Port of Baltimore enters the year hoping to continue its steady growth in cargo by capitalizing on last year's agreements liberalizing world trade.Both the North American Free Trade Agreement and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade accord are expected to increase trade in Baltimore and elsewhere by significantly reducing or eliminating tariffs."We're anticipating a positive impact at the port of Baltimore," said Michael P. Angelos, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, which oversees the state's five public marine terminals.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
Developers of a subsidized cargo-handling facility at the Port of Baltimore hope the so-called "Container Freight Station" will provide employment for unionized longshoremen who've lost work in recent years.The facility will use members of the International Longshoremen's Association to load and unload cargo from standardized shipping containers. Their wages will be subsidized by a 30-cent-per-ton cargo assessment charged at all ILA ports.The subsidy is to help reduce the higher costs of using unionized labor and make it competitive with non-union stations operating off-pier.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
As smoke rose above Rosedale homes hours after a CSX train derailed and exploded May 28, many residents wondered what exactly was burning. Three of the railcars were transporting hazardous materials, and investigators believe it was sodium chlorate that exploded. Hazardous materials pass through American neighborhoods each day by train, and some advocates have been pushing for years to make it easier for people to know what those cars are carrying - and what effect they could have in a catastrophic accident.
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