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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
Towson University President Robert L. Caret, who bolstered his school's reputation through campus expansion, unprecedented fundraising and new academic programs, will leave to become the next president of the University of Massachusetts system after being selected Thursday over two other finalists. Caret has served as president at Towson since 2003 and has spent most of his career at the university. His aggressive efforts to expand Towson's physical footprint and academic scope made him a star among state university presidents but also caused occasional friction with community activists and other educational leaders.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
In trying to sum up the past five years, Rob Ambrose thought back to his introductory press conference as Towson University's football coach. "I said, 'If we hadn't won some ball games by year three, I hope they had [a] good furniture budget, because I was going to break something,'" he recalled. By the time Ambrose was hired, the university and its boosters had become accustomed to such gung-ho talk from new coaches, few of whom delivered the winning programs Towson sought. "He came off to me as maybe a little too optimistic about what he could do," former Towson president Robert L. Caret said with a chuckle.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2011
When Robert L. Caret became president of Towson University in 2003, he knew that the institution where he had begun as a professor in 1974 was set for a boom in student population. What he did not know was how Towson would look or how perceptions of it would differ after those thousands of students arrived. "What does Towson become when it grows up?" he says, remembering the question that loomed largest for him as a new leader. Eight years later, with Caret departing to take over the University of Massachusetts system, he says the answer has taken form, even if it's not complete.
NEWS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Towson University's new arena opens to the public Wednesday night when the Harlem Globetrotters tip off the first of three games in three nights. The traveling basketball troupe is making a special stop - it usually tours in the United States from December to March - to make history at the nearly $70 million arena, which the school calls "the best basketball facility in the Mid-Atlantic. " What Towson officials have been less bold about, so far, is outlining how Tiger Arena may help the athletic department, and the university, raise revenue.
NEWS
By [JENNIFER CHOI] | January 27, 2008
Maine native Dr. Robert L. Caret has spent most of his life in the world of academia. After receiving a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of New Hampshire in 1974, he began teaching at Towson. At the conclusion of a 21-year stint - including positions as faculty member, dean, executive vice president and provost - at the school, Caret left to assume the presidency of San Jose State University in 1995. In 2003, he returned to the area to become president of Towson University.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
The regents of the University System of Maryland have named a former provost of Towson University as the school's next president - only four months after he turned down the job. Robert L. Caret, the president of San Jose State University, has decided to return to Maryland to assume the presidency of the state's second-largest university, said system Chancellor William E. Kirwan. Caret, 55, was privately approved by the regents Tuesday and will be reintroduced today to the Towson campus, which he left in 1995 after serving there 21 years as a chemistry professor, dean and provost.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2003
Returning to the campus he left eight years ago, the next president of Towson University told dozens of faculty and staff yesterday that his aim is to bring the college the funding and recognition it is due. "My role is to make sure Towson gets more of the respect it deserves -- and as a result, more resources," said Robert L. Caret, Towson's former provost. "Towson needs to work hard on its image. Its image is solid, but it needs to be better. Towson deserves to be a player in the state of Maryland."
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
The Facebook page of Towson University President Robert Caret lists a line from Pat Conroy as his favorite quotation: "Why do they not teach you that time is a finger snap and an eye blink, and that you should not allow a moment to pass you by without taking joyous, ecstatic note of it, not wasting a moment of its swift, breakneck circuit?" In six years at Towson, Caret has not wasted a second. The university's recent skirmish with neighbors in Rodgers Forge, over the location of a new 5,000-seat arena, is an example of both Caret's urgency and his diplomacy.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2011
Towson University's provost will become its interim president after the departure next month of Robert L. Caret, a spokeswoman for the state university system confirmed Monday morning. William E. Kirwan, chancellor of the University System of Maryland, appointed Marcia G. Welsh, who has served as provost and vice president for academic affairs since 2009 at Towson. The decision was announced to the Towson community in an email Monday, said system spokeswoman Anne Moultrie. Welsh will begin her new duties on April 20, the day after Caret is scheduled to depart Towson.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2003
When Robert L. Caret, the new president of Towson University, ventures out to talk about his vision for the school, he often gets asked about something else. "Everyone wants to know about the elevator," he says. "The elevator," of course, refers to one of the standout features of the mansion in Baltimore's Guilford neighborhood that Towson purchased and renovated - at a cost of $1.8 million - for Caret's predecessor. Mark L. Perkins resigned last year under fire for the spending, leaving it to an interim president and now Caret to handle the fallout and get the state's second-largest public university back on track.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2011
When Robert L. Caret became president of Towson University in 2003, he knew that the institution where he had begun as a professor in 1974 was set for a boom in student population. What he did not know was how Towson would look or how perceptions of it would differ after those thousands of students arrived. "What does Towson become when it grows up?" he says, remembering the question that loomed largest for him as a new leader. Eight years later, with Caret departing to take over the University of Massachusetts system, he says the answer has taken form, even if it's not complete.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2011
The people who care about Towson University athletics wondered one thing as they watched conference rival Virginia Commonwealth shock mighty Kansas to earn a berth in the Final Four: Why can't that be us? The question speaks to the hope Towson leaders harbor after securing $68 million for a new, on-campus arena and attracting a new men's basketball coach from the University of Pittsburgh. But it also speaks to their frustration that an athletic turnaround has not come more quickly.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2011
Towson University's provost will become its interim president after the departure next month of Robert L. Caret, a spokeswoman for the state university system confirmed Monday morning. William E. Kirwan, chancellor of the University System of Maryland, appointed Marcia G. Welsh, who has served as provost and vice president for academic affairs since 2009 at Towson. The decision was announced to the Towson community in an email Monday, said system spokeswoman Anne Moultrie. Welsh will begin her new duties on April 20, the day after Caret is scheduled to depart Towson.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
Towson University's embattled men's basketball team will interrupt this season's forced march through the Colonial Athletic Association to play an ESPN Bracketbusters game against Loyola College on Saturday. Never mind that the 4-22 Tigers — winless in 16 CAA games — are not close to busting any postseason tournament brackets. They will happily accept the diversion of playing their neighborhood-rival Greyhounds (13-13) at 7 p.m. at Towson Center. "Any time you're playing somebody in your backyard, it really does matter," Towson coach Pat Kennedy said.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
Towson University President Robert L. Caret, who bolstered his school's reputation through campus expansion, unprecedented fundraising and new academic programs, will leave to become the next president of the University of Massachusetts system after being selected Thursday over two other finalists. Caret has served as president at Towson since 2003 and has spent most of his career at the university. His aggressive efforts to expand Towson's physical footprint and academic scope made him a star among state university presidents but also caused occasional friction with community activists and other educational leaders.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2011
Towson University President Robert L. Caret is a leading candidate to become the next president of the University of Massachusetts system, according to published reports in Boston. Caret and the departing chancellor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Phillip Clay, are among the candidates who will sit for a second round of interviews Jan. 13, the Boston Globe reported. The UMass board of trustees could announce its selection after a special session the same day, a spokesman for the system said.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2011
Towson University President Robert L. Caret is a leading candidate to become the next president of the University of Massachusetts system, according to published reports in Boston. Caret and the departing chancellor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Phillip Clay, are among the candidates who will sit for a second round of interviews Jan. 13, the Boston Globe reported. The UMass board of trustees could announce its selection after a special session the same day, a spokesman for the system said.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2002
In the latest setback in Towson University's search for leadership, a California administrator withdrew his candidacy for the school's presidency yesterday -- just three days before he was expected to be given the job. Robert L. Caret, a former Towson provost and professor, said he has decided to remain as president of San Jose State University after giving "serious thought" to returning to be Towson's president. Regents of the University System of Maryland say that the board had been planning to vote on Caret as president at its meeting Friday.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2010
The state university system will attempt to add 45,000 students, hand out 10,000 more degrees annually and double its research funding to more than $2 billion by 2020, according to a new strategic plan approved Friday by the Board of Regents. Under the 10-year plan, the system will also attempt to convert more of its research into industry, churn out 40 percent more graduates in science, technology, engineering and math, and redesign introductory courses so fewer students drop out. "It's a very focused set of goals and initiatives bringing all of our assets to bear on the state's most pressing needs," said Chancellor William E. Kirwan.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2010
The tempest brewing around the fate of Baltimore's sole surviving single-screen movie theater continued to churn Monday, with one potential operator denying it had been forced to withdraw from consideration while another revealed an unexpected, last-minute appeal to take over the building. Towson University and its radio station, WTMD, dropped out of the running to operate the Senator Theatre because of economic concerns and not because of pressure from the Baltimore Development Corp.
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