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NEWS
November 7, 2013
What: Second annual Howard County Office on Aging workshop for family caregivers: "Caregiving: You Are Not Alone. " When: Saturday, Nov. 9, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Where: North Laurel Community Center, 9411 Whiskey Bottom Road. Details: Free. A keynote address will be given by Marsha Ansel, psychogeriatric coordinator for the Howard County Mental Health Authority. Following the keynote presentation, a variety of workshops will be offered on topics including legal matters, Howard County resources, long-term care options and stress management.
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NEWS
May 30, 2014
I am at this moment sitting in my mother's apartment; she is 102 and I remain with her as a caregiver weekdays from 6:30 p.m. to 11 a.m. and all day Sunday. Three very nice ladies cover for me when I'm not here, but keeping them is very expensive. I have been caring for my mom since 2012 and haven't been in my own bed at home two blocks away since then. The level of care my mother needs has risen, and now she needs a person with her 24/7. I don't object; she was a single mom and worked hard to care for our family, so now it's my turn.
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NEWS
March 24, 2014
As the CEO of Abilities Network, a member of the Maryland Association of Community Services and a provider of services to individuals with disabilities, I just want to add my voice to those advocating for an increase in wages for our direct support staff ( "Fairness for caregivers," March 21). These staff are asked to do a difficult and high level job at very low pay. All of our consumers work in individually selected jobs in their communities, and staff must be highly trained to support them to ensure that they provide the high quality job performance each employer expects.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
I want to thank U.S. Sen. Cory Booker for his article, "Parkinson's takes a toll on families, too" (April 23). I have Parkinson's, and my caregivers are my husband and my 24-year-old daughter. I can't tell you what I would do if I did not have them. I have no friends or family who check in on me unless they see me, then they ask how am I doing. Mr. Booker's mother was so lucky to have a support group that came around to see her and help out. Thank you very much for your positive article.
NEWS
March 24, 2014
Congratulations to Sen. Thomas M. Middleton for standing up for people who work very hard and are a breed above ( "Senator says he'll block minimum wage bill until state raises pay for caregivers," March 20). The direct support staff for individuals with disabilities are people who are caring, supportive and sometimes a voice for the people they care for. I admire and respect direct support workers. They do things that others would turn their nose up to and couldn't handle. They feed, bathe, lift, cook, clean, drive, give vital medications and are pretty much responsible for the quality of life a person with a disability can have.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
I strongly agree with letter writer Stephen H. Morgan's points regarding the work performed by direct care staff and the impact a minimum-wage increase could have on "front line" caregivers for developmentally disabled people ( "Minimum wage should not penalize disabled," Jan. 23). I see the work done daily as a member of the Chimes team. Most direct care staff are genuine, caring people, and while we all work to earn a paycheck, these folks daily go above and beyond. If direct care support staff wages are not raised in line with a minimum wage increase, many will be forced to seek employment elsewhere in order to provide for their families.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | October 17, 2013
Caring for a chronically ill or disabled family member has long been associated with stress, but a new study suggests that the practice gives those caregivers a survival advantage. A study of 3,000 family caregivers showed no increase in health risk and a nine-month increase in life expectancy over the study's six-year period. “Taking care of a chronically ill person in your family is often associated with stress, and caregiving has been previously linked to increased mortality rates,” said David L. Roth, director of the Johns Hopkins University Center on Aging and Health and a study author, in a statement.
NEWS
December 18, 2012
Letter writer Ted Houk resorts to specious statements to argue that patients should verify the credentials of their caregivers to make sure they are being treated by licensed physicians rather than by people who merely claim to be doctors ("Beware of charlatans claiming to be physicians," Dec. 13). He uses as an example Shawn Nowlen, the Baltimore city schools employee who marketed himself to parents as a social worker and a counselor when in fact he was neither, and who impregnated at 15-year-old girl whose mother entrusted her to his care.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
I want to thank U.S. Sen. Cory Booker for his article, "Parkinson's takes a toll on families, too" (April 23). I have Parkinson's, and my caregivers are my husband and my 24-year-old daughter. I can't tell you what I would do if I did not have them. I have no friends or family who check in on me unless they see me, then they ask how am I doing. Mr. Booker's mother was so lucky to have a support group that came around to see her and help out. Thank you very much for your positive article.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
Melwood applauds Sen. Thomas M. Middleton's efforts to increase pay for caregivers who directly support people with disabilities ( "Fairness for caregivers," March 20). Based in Upper Marlboro, Melwood is one of the largest employers of people with differing abilities in Maryland, providing more than 760 dedicated workers with good jobs and direct supports. In the Baltimore area, Melwood employs more than 100 people at the U.S. Coast Guard's Curtis Bay facility and at Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Ending a standoff that had stalled the governor's top legislative priority, General Assembly leaders said Wednesday that they have reached a deal to raise Maryland's minimum wage, while also boosting the pay of workers caring for the developmentally disabled. Under terms unveiled by Sen. Thomas M. Middleton and approved by the Senate Finance Committee, the minimum wage would rise incrementally to $10.10 by July 2018, two years later than Gov. Martin O'Malley proposed. At the same time, funding for state-paid workers who care for the developmentally disabled would increase by about $30 million a year starting in fiscal 2016, Middleton said.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
Melwood applauds Sen. Thomas M. Middleton's efforts to increase pay for caregivers who directly support people with disabilities ( "Fairness for caregivers," March 20). Based in Upper Marlboro, Melwood is one of the largest employers of people with differing abilities in Maryland, providing more than 760 dedicated workers with good jobs and direct supports. In the Baltimore area, Melwood employs more than 100 people at the U.S. Coast Guard's Curtis Bay facility and at Fort Meade.
NEWS
March 24, 2014
Congratulations to Sen. Thomas M. Middleton for standing up for people who work very hard and are a breed above ( "Senator says he'll block minimum wage bill until state raises pay for caregivers," March 20). The direct support staff for individuals with disabilities are people who are caring, supportive and sometimes a voice for the people they care for. I admire and respect direct support workers. They do things that others would turn their nose up to and couldn't handle. They feed, bathe, lift, cook, clean, drive, give vital medications and are pretty much responsible for the quality of life a person with a disability can have.
NEWS
March 24, 2014
State Sen. Thomas M. Middleton deserves praise, as do The Sun and reporter Tim Wheeler for calling attention to the issue of caregivers for developmentally disabled individuals ( "Senator says he'll block minimum wage bill until the state raises pay for caregivers," March 20). Too often we forget the people who make it possible for many others to live productive, healthy and safe lives. Not all caregivers are paid, but ask any parent or other family member trusted with providing care to a child, sibling or parent how hard the task is and be prepared to hear how much of their life it consumes.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
I strongly agree with letter writer Stephen H. Morgan's points regarding the work performed by direct care staff and the impact a minimum-wage increase could have on "front line" caregivers for developmentally disabled people ( "Minimum wage should not penalize disabled," Jan. 23). I see the work done daily as a member of the Chimes team. Most direct care staff are genuine, caring people, and while we all work to earn a paycheck, these folks daily go above and beyond. If direct care support staff wages are not raised in line with a minimum wage increase, many will be forced to seek employment elsewhere in order to provide for their families.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 5, 2014
The hotel chain Extended Stay America is partnering with the American Cancer Society to provide free and discounted rooms cancer patients being treated away from home. The chain will offer 40,000 rooms to patients and caregivers, including half of them for free, over two years. The other half will be available for $12 a night. The effort is launching in Baltimore and nine other cities, after an initial pilot program in three cities. The Cancer Society program is called Hope Lodge , and currently offers rooms in Baltimore and around the country.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
When she was fresh out of nursing school in the early 1970s, the last thing Mary Fridley expected to do with her life was work with the elderly. "How depressing would that be?" she says she thought at the time. Then she took a temporary job at a nursing home, where she met the Caroler. She doesn't remember his name, but Fridley could not recall the man more clearly. He was so far along in his dementia that he needed caregivers to feed him. He had such a bad habit of scraping his knuckles on things that he had to wear mittens.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
The General Assembly has passed a law that allows caregivers of patients who use medical marijuana to possess up to an ounce of pot without being convicted of a crime. "We are expressing our belief that people who are sick should be able to access the drug without civil or criminal penalties," said Sen. Jamie Raskin, a Montgomery County Democrat who introduced the bill. Patients are protected under a 2011 law that allows them to use medical necessity as an "affirmative defense" in court if caught with marijuana and drug paraphernalia.
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