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NEWS
May 27, 1993
Today is the Anne Arundel County Council's last chance to save the Careers Center, a wonderful program that has been helping troubled teens for 15 years.Last year, the council's last-minute lobbying persuaded County Executive Robert R. Neall to put the $330,000 program back in the budget. This year, Mr. Neall seems determined to kill it no matter what anyone says.Council members should try anyway. Most of them support the Crownsville-based facility, but other than making a few comments about what a shame it would be to lose it, they've done nothing to fight for it.Before the council helps Mr. Neall drive the last nail in the Careers Center's coffin, the members should consider a few facts:* It costs $3,300 to put a teen-ager through the Careers Center, versus $18,000 or more to keep him or her in jail for a year.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
Lanham-based veterans group Amvets has been awarded a $250,000 grant to bring veterans' job services to 20 new markets around the country. The grant comes from the Call of Duty Endowment, which provides grants to groups that find jobs for veterans. Amvets expects to open career centers in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Iowa, California, Florida, Missouri and Tennessee. The unemployment rate for veterans improved overall in 2012 to 7 percent, according to a U.S. Labor Department annual report released Wednesday.
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NEWS
May 27, 1993
Today is the Anne Arundel County Council's last chance to save the Careers Center, a wonderful program that has been helping troubled teens for 15 years.Last year, the council's last-minute lobbying persuaded County Executive Robert R. Neall to put the $330,000 program back in the budget. This year, Mr. Neall seems determined to kill it no matter what anyone says.Council members should try anyway. Most of them support the Crownsville-based facility, but other than making a few comments about what a shame it would be to lose it, they've done nothing to fight for it. Before the council helps Mr. Neall drive the last nail in the Careers Center coffin, they should remember a few facts:* It costs $3,300 to put a teen-ager through the Careers Center, versus $18,000 or more to keep him or her in jail for a year.
EXPLORE
By Patrice Dirican, pdirican@theaegis.com | July 15, 2011
It was with sadness that I learned of the imminent closing of Open Doors Career Center after a story that ran July 1 in our paper, which stated that the nonprofit organization was forced to officially dissolve as of June 30 in response to budget cuts over the past few years. I don't know a lot about the agency, but was compelled to take a closer look after hearing the news that Open Doors would be shutting its doors. Founded in 1979, the center originally served displaced homemakers and at-home moms and over the next three decades expanded its programs to serve teens and seniors.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer John A. Morris contributed to this article | May 21, 1995
For 15 years Anne Arundel County's Careers Center in Crownsville helped steer wayward youth away from a life of crime. In June 1993 it was gone, axed from the budget by then-County Executive Robert R. Neall.In 1994, juvenile arrests skyrocketed in five categories, from as little as 12 percent in thefts to as much as 259 percent in car thefts, compared with 1993.While no one has argued that the closing of the Careers Center led to the rise in juvenile crime, County Executive John G. Gary has said it is time to reopen the center.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | June 20, 1993
Under the shade of a grove of trees in front of the Careers Center building in Crownsville, 15 once-troubled youths celebrated their graduation Friday from the program that many said helped turn their lives around.But the traditional congratulatory speeches about hope for the future, a staple of graduation ceremonies, were accompanied by eulogies for the program itself.The Careers Center, a victim of the budget ax wielded by County Executive Robert R. Neall, will close its doors at the end of the month.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | May 17, 1992
The Anne Arundel County Careers Center has a tough job, and does it remarkably well.So why does County Executive Robert R. Neall want to abolish it?The center takes youths who have gotten into trouble with the law, keeps them out of jail, educates them and helps them land a job. It shows them -- and makes them believe -- that society cares. And it does so remarkably well. Last time anyone checked, 80 percent of the kids who go through the center stay out of trouble with the law.That's a success rate similar programs can only dream about.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
In a dimly lit office at a Crownsville school for troubled youths, five almost-lost souls sit quietly, discussing in turn their problems and the circumstances that landed them here.There's Chad, the 16-year-old from Glen Burnie, who has a juvenile arrest record so extensive his friends joke there's not enough paper in a reporter's notebook to get it all down.There's DeeDee, 18, from Annapolis, eight months pregnant and expelled from school for fighting. She's also spent time in a girl's home for theft and assault.
NEWS
May 10, 1992
Money for Careers CenterFrom: John R. LeopoldFormer memberGeneral AssemblyEditor's note: The following letter is addressed to County Executive Robert R. Neall.I was disappointed to learn in recent news reports that your proposed fiscal year 1993 budget does not provide for the continued funding of the Careers Center in Crownsville.As you know, the Careers Center has been highly successful in turning troubled, alienated youth into productive Anne Arundel County citizens. In its nearly 15 years of existence, the Center has worked with approximately 1,500 youths, 75 percent of whom are now contributing, responsible citizens of the county.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | October 23, 1994
The Careers Center, the highly touted county program for juvenile delinquents that fell victim last year to budget cuts, would reopen if Democrat Theodore J. Sophocleus is elected county executive.Mr. Sophocleus pledged to open the center, which provided job training for troubled youth, as part of a four-point juvenile justice program that also would include using house arrest and weekend lockups for youths who violate the terms of their probation. He also proposed a work-study camp during the summer for juveniles on probation who don't have jobs or aren't attending classes.
NEWS
August 12, 2010
Your recent article "Help's on the way with career center" (Aug. 12)," highlights a great tool to help residents of Baltimore County to connect to employment opportunities. During these difficult economic times, a greater number of Baltimore area residents have found themselves out of work, through no fault of their own. As local companies have downsized or simply closed their doors, their former employees need to access resources to re-enter the workforce. In particular, the county's Mobile Career Center can help jobseekers access occupational training programs that can give them the skills they need to compete for jobs in areas of our local economy that hold promise for future career options.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2010
Less than four years ago, Bill Harmon lived hand to mouth on the streets of Baltimore, struggled with a drug addiction that depleted his savings and had no prospects for a job with a future. These days, a drug-free Harmon has a job he believes is the future, thanks to a green careers training program run by Civic Works, Baltimore's urban service corps. Harmon, 56, works as a field technician in the burgeoning environmental industry, where he tests for contaminated soil on construction sites and helps contain hazardous material during demolitions.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2010
Baltimore County has put the job search on wheels with a $330,000 mobile career center focused on serving ex-convicts as they return to the community. A federal grant helped the county's Office of Workforce Development purchase and outfit the 29-foot-long Ford truck with six computer stations, telephones and fax machines. At least three jobs counselors will be available at all times as the truck makes its rounds to the Baltimore County Detention Center, the four locations of the Division of Parole and Probation and several areas with high crime rates.
NEWS
By Karen Anderson and Karen Anderson,Capital News Service | June 14, 2009
As Baltimore's unemployment rate rose, many people headed to the library. Since the onset of the recession, attendance at the Enoch Pratt Free Library's career center classes has jumped 92 percent. For free, the Central Library on Cathedral Street in downtown Baltimore offers a range of classes that teach how to build a resume, network strategically, search and apply for jobs online, make job seekers' employment "recession-proof," get a federal job in 10 steps and develop basic interviewing skills.
FEATURES
February 8, 2007
Film Trying to be a hip-hop dancer Three young women compete for roles in hip-hop videos in Breakin' In: The Making of a Hip-Hop Dancer, being shown at 12:30 p.m. at Anne Arundel Community College, Careers Center, Room 284, 101 Col lege Parkway, Arnold. The event is free. Call 410-777-2807 or go to aacc.edu/womensinst.
NEWS
July 19, 2005
Maryland New Directions, a nonprofit career counseling center at 611 Park Ave. in Mount Vernon, is offering workshops for job seekers. From 10 a.m. to noon today, participants can learn to write or improve a resume. A seminar on answering difficult questions during interviews is planned from 10 a.m. to noon Thursday. A workshop for ex-felons from 10 a.m. to noon July 26 will focus on discussing one's legal history with an employer. Information: 410-230-0630.
FEATURES
February 8, 2007
Film Trying to be a hip-hop dancer Three young women compete for roles in hip-hop videos in Breakin' In: The Making of a Hip-Hop Dancer, being shown at 12:30 p.m. at Anne Arundel Community College, Careers Center, Room 284, 101 Col lege Parkway, Arnold. The event is free. Call 410-777-2807 or go to aacc.edu/womensinst.
NEWS
By ELISE ARMACOST | May 9, 1993
For the second straight year, Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall is aiming his budget ax at the Careers Center. He is convinced the Crownsville-based program doesn't help juvenile delinquents any more than simple probation. The teen-agers in the program disagree."He ought to come down here himself and talk to us. We'll even send the van down to pick him up," says Joaquin, 15. "This program is helping kids. If it wasn't for the Careers Center, where would we be now? We'd all be junkies and thieves."
NEWS
March 2, 2005
BALTIMORE Mayor's Office of Employment Development www.oedworks.com Northwest One-Stop Career Center: 2401 Liberty Heights Ave., Mondawmin Mall, Suite 302, Baltimore, 410-523-1060, Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday; 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday. Southwest One-Stop Career Center 201 S. Arlington Ave., Baltimore, 410-396-3670, Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday. Eastside One-Stop Career Center: 3001 E. Madison St., Baltimore, 410-396-9030, Hours: 8:30 a.m to 4:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday; 8:30 am to 7 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2002
A committee that studied the career and technology programs in Carroll County public schools has recommended sweeping changes, including the closure of the Career and Technology Center at South Carroll High and a $26.9 million expansion of the Westminster career center over the next five years. The proposal also calls for $815,000 in start-up costs and $1.1 million in annual operating expenses for expanded automotive and cosmetology programs - two of the school system's most popular offerings - and for new programs in biotechnology, criminal justice, electronics and telecommunication, engineering, finance and databases.
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