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NEWS
By Arnold Packer | January 3, 2012
My two teenage granddaughters are high school seniors. They both plan to take next year off before entering college while they try to figure out how to connect to adult roles. How will they fit in the wider community? What are the careers where they will earn their livelihoods? While they struggle, they are not without resources: a good and successful public high school education, parents and family members who are professionals and connected to networks, extracurricular experiences in theater or school government, and part-time jobs.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Orioles center fielder Adam Jones admitted before Saturday's Game 2 of the American League Championship Series that he might need to be a little more patient at the plate for his team to get back into the series against the Kansas City Royals. Jones doesn't make any apologies for his aggressiveness at the plate, but he noted that the playoffs offer a different game, inherently smaller strike zones and more opportunity for batters to wait on their pitch to hit. And Jones has struggled in the postseason, entering the day just 5-for-42 with 11 strikeouts in 10 career playoff games.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
Anne Arundel Community College has won a $19.7 million federal grant to help increase the number of workers in science, math, engineering and technology fields across the country, the state said Wednesday. The institution will lead the National STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Consortium, made up of 10 community colleges in nine states. Their goal: to design certificate programs that community colleges nationwide can put in place to get students up to speed in technical fields.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
For some thoroughbreds at Pimlico Race Course on Saturday, it had been mere months since their last race. Now, as the ex-racehorses trotted onto the track, they were asked by riders not to run like the wind, but do something entirely different - circle barrels, leap hurdles or prance precisely in dressage, an Olympic equestrian sport. The horses at the second annual Thoroughbred Makeover: A Marketplace & National Symposium resisted the urge to take off when they heard the boom of an announcer's voice.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
Shannon Sharpe remembers vividly the late-night conversations in his kitchen with a 25-year-old Ray Lewis. It was 2000, and the young linebacker was staying with his new Ravens teammate in Sharpe's Atlanta home as he endured a murder trial that could have cost him his career and freedom. Even during those most trying times, Sharpe noted, the young man steered conversation to his future, to greatness. Not excellence, which Lewis had already achieved, but lasting, stamp-on-the-game greatness.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 1, 1991
NEW YORK -- Three years ago, Mats Wilander won the U.S. Open at age 24 and became the world's No. 1-ranked men's player. After trading in his racket for a guitar, Wilander is on the road with a Swedish rock-and-roll band.Monica Seles is 17, has won two Grand Slam tournaments this year and could add the U.S. Open to her collection. But in five years, she might be starring in "Truth or Dare II."The era of growing up and growing old with your favorite tennis stars may be coming to an end. Careers are shorter.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | February 13, 2008
Donna Koczaja juggled five balls at once, balanced a juggling pin on the tip of her nose and kept three balls in the air while tossing one at a time to Andrew Love, who also kept three balls aloft while tossing them back to her. "We're not juggling," Koczaja said. "We're applying physics." The movement of the balls, she said, shows periodic motion and conservation of energy. "As the ball goes up, it slows down until it stops for just a fraction of a second," she said. Balancing the pin on her nose showcased the concept of the center of gravity.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | February 3, 1991
Audrey Poole was no stranger to having her career as a social workerinterrupted for the sake of her husband's job as an executive with YMCA International. During a 10-year period, she left her own jobs to move with him -- first to Ohio, then to Connecticut, and even to Nairobi, Kenya.But she wasn't prepared for what she found when the couple came to Maryland in 1983."The last time I worked in the field of social work, I was probably making $21,000 or $22,000. When I first came here, I was offered something like $15,000, plus I was going to be supervised by people who probably had less experience in the field than I had."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- By all accounts, the simultaneous election of Hall of Fame inductees George Brett and Robin Yount was a perfect touch, because the two are great friends and have so much in common.Their playing careers ran almost parallel, right up to the two-week span in which each got his 3,000th career hit in 1992. Both retired after the following year and, perhaps most significant, each played his entire big-league career for what is now considered a small-market franchise.Two small-market guys will be inducted today in the same class at Cooperstown.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
At 62, two years after an early retirement, Jack Knox is trying to reinvent himself.Samuel Steiner, 52, wants to use several decades' worth of computer skills to start a new part-time career.Glenn Cobb, 57, out of work for six months, is trying to restart his business management and finance career.And Teressa Cross, 55, is looking for something besides a job as a nursing assistant or factory work.They all attended Howard County's first 50+ Expo on Friday at Wilde Lake High School, passing up the free flu shots, the lectures on estate planning and financial security and the costumed actors loudly inviting everyone in sight to a Baltimore show called "Tony 'n' Tina's Wedding."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
In Johns Hopkins' 33-14 rout of Moravian on Sept. 20, senior quarterback Braden Anderson posted career highs in passing yards (218) and completion percentage (73.5). It took Anderson only one week to surpass those totals, throwing for 359 yards and connecting on 76.3 percent of his passes in Saturday's 42-26 victory over Centennial Conference foe Muhlenberg. Add a career-best four touchdowns, and it's easy to see why Blue Jays coach Jim Margraff called Anderson's performance the best of his career.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Orioles left-hander Zach Britton won't lie about it. Yes, in the past year, he considered what it would be like to wear a different uniform, to get a second chance elsewhere. Heading into last fall, Britton had struggled through consecutive rocky seasons in which a shoulder injury, lack of command and cracking confidence had thrust him into a career crossroads. Once considered a future ace, Britton weathered a brutal final month last season, pitching poorly in a spot start against the Cleveland Indians before being jettisoned to instructional league while his teammates were fighting in a pennant race.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
When Eastern Tech football coach Marc Mesaros earned his 100th career victory Friday, he was more thrilled with the way his team played in its 51-7 win over Pikesville. The Mavericks, however, were more interested in the milestone, presenting Mesaros a football with "100" written on it. "All the kids signed it, and they had a big announcement at the end of the game. The kids dumped water on me," Mesaros said with a laugh. "It was a very nice show of affection and respect. "The 100-win thing is great.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
NEW YORK - When the Yankee Stadium crowd began chanting New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter's name after his final at-bat Wednesday after a routine groundout - trying to coax the future Hall of Famer out of the dugout - Orioles manager Buck Showalter knew it wasn't happening. It wasn't the right time. “He had a tough at-bat, a ground ball back to the pitcher,” Showalter said, “I told a couple of our guys, 'He ain't coming out of the dugout. Just watch.' That's all you need to know about Derek because it didn't fit in the context of what was [happening]
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Holly W. Bennett Jr., a retired Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. construction coordinator who had a second career playing Santa Claus, died Monday at his grandson's Halethorpe home of complications from dementia. He was 84. The son of Holly W. Bennett Sr., a steamship and fire boat captain, and Edith C. Bennett, a homemaker, Holly Wells Bennett Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville. A 1949 graduate of Catonsville High School, he was a member of the Marine Corps Reserve and was called to active duty in 1950.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Three weeks into this season, Steve Pearce walked out of the Orioles manager Buck Showalter's office in Toronto, sat down and just stared into his locker. It was an all-too-familiar feeling for Pearce, who had just been told he was being designated for assignment. The Orioles had an early season roster crunch and needed to add bullpen reinforcements. Pearce, who had just seven at-bats at the time, was the odd man out. Pearce's hope was that he'd clear waivers, be outrighted to Triple-A Norfolk - where he could receive regular playing time - and eventually rejoin the major league club.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
While talking over each other on the Sunday pregame shows, national analysts often make passing comments about the increasing age of the Ravens' defense, as if the team's Gatorade jugs were filled with prune juice and 11 senior citizens were trying to trip up ball-carriers with their walkers. John Harbaugh cringes, too, when he hears those talking heads calling his defense old. "I get mad as heck. It doesn't make me happy," the Ravens coach said. "[But] it's great to be underestimated.
NEWS
May 28, 2000
In Baltimore City Pupils to share their book on animal careers at zoo Pupils at Seven Oaks Elementary School in Perry Hall will read their original book about zoo careers to classmates, teachers, parents and employees at the Baltimore Zoo on Wednesday. Four classes of second-graders wrote and illustrated the book, "Jeff and Tracy Talk About Zoo Jobs," as part of a career awareness initiative in which they interviewed zookeepers and staff. They will give copies of the book to members of the zoo's mammal, education, horticulture and hospital care departments.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
As one of the shortest players on the Morgan State football team, Herb Walker Jr. has a nickname among his Bears teammates: "Smurf. " The running back, who recently confessed to being 1 inch shorter than his already diminutive listed height of 5 feet 8, has heard worse from defenses. The insults don't bother him as much as the assumptions behind them. Opponents tell Walker he's "soft. Or I don't run hard," he said. "But they'll feel me when I get the ball. " Neither label fit after the 19-year-old Walker set a school record a week ago. In Morgan State's 26-23 loss Saturday to Holy Cross, 26-23, the sophomore rushed for 271 yards and two touchdowns on 29 carries.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
From a logistical standpoint, Orioles starter Miguel Gonzalez hasn't had a particularly stable season. He has dealt with one stint on the disabled list, pitched out of the bullpen once and twice was demoted to the minor leagues as part of the club's continual roster tweaks. If Gonzalez keeps pitching like he did Wednesday in a 6-0 victory over the Cincinnati Reds, though, he'll ultimately end up with just one destination next month: The postseason. That's his ultimate goal after an elevator of a season.
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