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By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2001
HERE'S AN IDEA for those women in the community who work outside the home or just don't have the time to join a daytime club. Or maybe you want to get more connected to what's going on locally. You may find a great resource in the Career Woman's Group of the Woman's Club of Linthicum Heights. Started about a year ago by the club, the group meets some evenings and Saturdays. All interested women in the community and club members who are unable to attend daytime programs are invited. The next Career Woman's Group meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. Oct. 22 at St. John Lutheran Church, 300 W. Maple Road.
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By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2005
For Nadia Peck, the inspiration for her furniture business came in the form of something she couldn't find - a glass-topped table. Peck was looking for such a table in Harford County, with no luck. "That's where it started," Peck recalled, sitting behind her desk in the office of By Design, the business she started in 1994. She decided that if she wanted a reasonably priced glass-topped table, surely other people wanted one, too. "In Harford County, it's very traditional," Peck said. "If it wasn't antique, nobody had it."
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 26, 1999
In any other city, a revival of Clare Boothe Luce's 1936 play, "The Women," would probably seem like a period piece. But in Washington in the midst of President Clinton's impeachment trial, this drama about catty, gossiping women and their cheating husbands suddenly seems like social commentary.Not that director Kyle Donnelly has updated Arena Stage's production. Far from it. Paul Tazewell's marvelous Thirties costumes -- replete with a glorious array of hats -- and Thomas Lynch's Art Deco set hew strictly to the style of pre-World War II high society.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2001
HERE'S AN IDEA for those women in the community who work outside the home or just don't have the time to join a daytime club. Or maybe you want to get more connected to what's going on locally. You may find a great resource in the Career Woman's Group of the Woman's Club of Linthicum Heights. Started about a year ago by the club, the group meets some evenings and Saturdays. All interested women in the community and club members who are unable to attend daytime programs are invited. The next Career Woman's Group meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. Oct. 22 at St. John Lutheran Church, 300 W. Maple Road.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff writer | March 23, 1992
Most recently, it was Hillary Clinton defending her high-powered legal career: "I suppose I could have stayed home and baked cookies and had teas."Several days earlier, it was a critic in The New Republic declaring, "Women should feel . . . free to have five children and bake cookies all day . . ."So we ask: What's with the cookies, anyway?"It's a metaphor," said Heidi Brennan, co-director of Mothers at Home, a Vienna, Va.-based network of some 14,000 women. "It's saying mothering is a frivolous activity."
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff writer | March 23, 1992
Most recently, it was Hillary Clinton defending her high-powered legal career: "I suppose I could have stayed home and baked cookies and had teas."Several days earlier, it was a critic in The New Republic declaring, "Women should feel . . . free to have five children and bake cookies all day . . ."So we ask: What's with the cookies, anyway?"It's a metaphor," said Heidi Brennan, co-director of Mothers at Home, a Vienna, Va.-based network of some 14,000 women. "It's saying mothering is a frivolous activity."
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | September 1, 1992
Chicago -- It has frequently been said that Hillary Clinton, if her husband is elected, would be the first president's wife who had a full-time career before going to the White House. That is not true.Eleanor Roosevelt, whose children were grown by the time Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, and whose marriage had become a hollow formality, was a full-time professional before moving into the White House.She taught at the high school level in a private school (the Todhunter School)
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2005
For Nadia Peck, the inspiration for her furniture business came in the form of something she couldn't find - a glass-topped table. Peck was looking for such a table in Harford County, with no luck. "That's where it started," Peck recalled, sitting behind her desk in the office of By Design, the business she started in 1994. She decided that if she wanted a reasonably priced glass-topped table, surely other people wanted one, too. "In Harford County, it's very traditional," Peck said. "If it wasn't antique, nobody had it."
FEATURES
October 8, 1992
Designer Dana Buchman will share her philosophy on balancing personal and professional life for today's career woman at Nordstrom in Towson Town Center tomorrow at 6:30 p.m. She will discuss what inspires her to design for these women and tie her talk to a fashion show of her newest dresses and sportswear with a reception to follow. R.S.V.P. by calling (410) 296-2111.
NEWS
August 25, 1995
Adele Simpson, 91, a pioneer in women's fashion who designed wardrobes for first ladies and movie stars, died Wednesday in Greenwich, Conn. Four years after she began her career at 17 in her native New York City, Mrs. Simpson was one of the highest-paid designers in the world. She founded Adele Simpson Inc., in 1949. A founding member in the 1930s of the Fashion Group, an organization of women in the fashion industry, she was one of the first to create a career woman's wardrobe that included pants.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 26, 1999
In any other city, a revival of Clare Boothe Luce's 1936 play, "The Women," would probably seem like a period piece. But in Washington in the midst of President Clinton's impeachment trial, this drama about catty, gossiping women and their cheating husbands suddenly seems like social commentary.Not that director Kyle Donnelly has updated Arena Stage's production. Far from it. Paul Tazewell's marvelous Thirties costumes -- replete with a glorious array of hats -- and Thomas Lynch's Art Deco set hew strictly to the style of pre-World War II high society.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | September 1, 1992
Chicago -- It has frequently been said that Hillary Clinton, if her husband is elected, would be the first president's wife who had a full-time career before going to the White House. That is not true.Eleanor Roosevelt, whose children were grown by the time Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, and whose marriage had become a hollow formality, was a full-time professional before moving into the White House.She taught at the high school level in a private school (the Todhunter School)
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff writer | March 23, 1992
Most recently, it was Hillary Clinton defending her high-powered legal career: "I suppose I could have stayed home and baked cookies and had teas."Several days earlier, it was a critic in The New Republic declaring, "Women should feel . . . free to have five children and bake cookies all day . . ."So we ask: What's with the cookies, anyway?"It's a metaphor," said Heidi Brennan, co-director of Mothers at Home, a Vienna, Va.-based network of some 14,000 women. "It's saying mothering is a frivolous activity."
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff writer | March 23, 1992
Most recently, it was Hillary Clinton defending her high-powered legal career: "I suppose I could have stayed home and baked cookies and had teas."Several days earlier, it was a critic in The New Republic declaring, "Women should feel . . . free to have five children and bake cookies all day . . ."So we ask: What's with the cookies, anyway?"It's a metaphor," said Heidi Brennan, co-director of Mothers at Home, a Vienna, Va.-based network of some 14,000 women. "It's saying mothering is a frivolous activity."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 25, 2008
With everyone from the TV-awards circuit to Entertainment Weekly declaring Tina Fey the new queen of comedy, the producers of Baby Mama (including Saturday Night Live's Lorne Michaels) have treated her first star vehicle as a coronation. I love Tina Fey (who doesn't?), but you can start the crowning without me. Playing a variation on the nice, sassy, confused single career-woman that she portrays on 30 Rock, Fey inhabits what should be her comfort zone as Kate Holbrook, a development vice president for a Whole Foods-like company (the wittily titled Real Earth)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2011
Kathy Renee Averella, a legal secretary, died of cancer Dec. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 55 and lived in Baltimore. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Claudia and Lou Averella and grew up in Highlandtown. She attended Patterson High School and Strayer Business College before becoming a legal secretary. She worked in downtown Baltimore for attorneys P. Paul Cocoros and Goodman Meagher & Enoch. Family members said she enjoyed trips to Florida and Disney World.
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