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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2009
SALARY: $65,000 AGE: 48 YEARS ON THE JOB: 2 How he got started: : Mark Williams worked for 10 years in quality control for a chemical company. He decided to get an associate's degree in business administration from the Community College of Baltimore County, working at the chemical company at night and taking classes during the day. While attending school, he served as president of the student government association and began working with new students, helping...
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SPORTS
By Pete Barrett, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Maurice Clarett took the microphone and worked his way down the stairs on the left side of the stage of the Frederick Douglass auditorium. He wasn't going to put himself on a pedestal, he was going to tell his story about hitting rock bottom, from the ground floor. Wearing a gray suit, Clarett - in a low, raspy voice - told 69 football players from Baltimore high schools that three and a half weeks after his now-fiancee, Ashley Evans gave birth to his daughter, he was arrested, and subsequently served three and a half years in jail.
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2008
Salary: $80,000 Age: 64 Years on the job: 30 How he got started: Adams began his career as a high school teacher with a degree in theology. He was asked to teach a career development course to his students that focused on exposing them to different types of jobs. He ended up teaching career development for 10 years at the high school level. Adams then left teaching for a few years to work in business management but went back, this time instructing college students in career and job development for seven years.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Former Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III has joined the criminal justice faculty at Stevenson University, the school announced today.  The move comes after much speculation about what arguably the city's most successful top cop in recent history would do after retiring this year. Bealefeld will serve as a full-time distinguished professional in criminal justice and instructor, teaching coursework for undergraduates and helping develop a center for criminal justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 7, 1999
Mission: To provide career development, employment and related social services to help people with special needs enjoy the dignity and benefits of work and a better quality of life. Goodwill Industries in the Baltimore area started in 1919 when the first factory was opened at Broadway Methodist Episcopal Church. Two indigent employees were hired to stencil and fold burlap bags that would be sent out to collect reclaimable household goods that could be sold. This cycle of donation, processing, resale and wages remains essentially intact today.
NEWS
By From staff reports | August 13, 1998
As part of a nationwide health initiative, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation announced yesterday a five-year, $2 million grant to Vision for Health Consortium of Baltimore, a coalition of providers that targets Sandtown-Winchester.Consortium officials said they plan to use the money to better care for the underserved, and will include the community's views on how care should be delivered. A supervisory body, made up mostly of residents, will oversee the project's effectiveness.The Baltimore coalition is one of 13 groups selected nationwide.
EXPLORE
July 21, 2011
Career development trainer Brian Smith knows that finding a job requires more than excellent job skills. It also requires a job seeker to excel in applying for and interviewing for positions. Smith seeks to get them back on track with career development courses, which are among the many classes his Laurel-based nonprofit organization, EduSerc, offers to adults. "We have been experiencing an increase of individuals who have become comfortable being out of work and have lost the thought process to keep a job or maintain a job," Smith said.
NEWS
April 20, 2005
Raymond Holmes Career counselor for the city of Baltimore Age: 34 Years in business: Three. Salary: The city pays $25,800 to $38,000 for the position of career development facilitator. Background: After graduating from the University of Baltimore with a degree in business administration, he worked as a program coordinator at the YMCA. He then moved to the city post. Humor is the key: Holmes' light-hearted approach to the job includes wearing a lab coat, calling himself "doctor" and prescribing remedies for his "patients."
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | November 26, 1994
Robert Holley Jr. has fallen in love with education."I'll be in school forever now," said the 57-year-old steelworker, who has taken courses in photography, computers and math in recent years. "This is the best opportunity in the world."Mr. Holley's newfound infatuation has come thanks to the Career Development Center, a joint project between Bethlehem Steel Corp. and the United Steelworkers of America -- the union representing workers at the Sparrows Point mill.The center, part of a nationwide program at major steel companies, offers a wide variety of options, ranging from technical courses in computers and various crafts to liberal arts studies, many of which have no direct connection to the steel industry.
SPORTS
By Pete Barrett, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Maurice Clarett took the microphone and worked his way down the stairs on the left side of the stage of the Frederick Douglass auditorium. He wasn't going to put himself on a pedestal, he was going to tell his story about hitting rock bottom, from the ground floor. Wearing a gray suit, Clarett - in a low, raspy voice - told 69 football players from Baltimore high schools that three and a half weeks after his now-fiancee, Ashley Evans gave birth to his daughter, he was arrested, and subsequently served three and a half years in jail.
EXPLORE
July 21, 2011
Career development trainer Brian Smith knows that finding a job requires more than excellent job skills. It also requires a job seeker to excel in applying for and interviewing for positions. Smith seeks to get them back on track with career development courses, which are among the many classes his Laurel-based nonprofit organization, EduSerc, offers to adults. "We have been experiencing an increase of individuals who have become comfortable being out of work and have lost the thought process to keep a job or maintain a job," Smith said.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2009
SALARY: $65,000 AGE: 48 YEARS ON THE JOB: 2 How he got started: : Mark Williams worked for 10 years in quality control for a chemical company. He decided to get an associate's degree in business administration from the Community College of Baltimore County, working at the chemical company at night and taking classes during the day. While attending school, he served as president of the student government association and began working with new students, helping...
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2008
Salary: $80,000 Age: 64 Years on the job: 30 How he got started: Adams began his career as a high school teacher with a degree in theology. He was asked to teach a career development course to his students that focused on exposing them to different types of jobs. He ended up teaching career development for 10 years at the high school level. Adams then left teaching for a few years to work in business management but went back, this time instructing college students in career and job development for seven years.
NEWS
April 20, 2005
Raymond Holmes Career counselor for the city of Baltimore Age: 34 Years in business: Three. Salary: The city pays $25,800 to $38,000 for the position of career development facilitator. Background: After graduating from the University of Baltimore with a degree in business administration, he worked as a program coordinator at the YMCA. He then moved to the city post. Humor is the key: Holmes' light-hearted approach to the job includes wearing a lab coat, calling himself "doctor" and prescribing remedies for his "patients."
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | November 10, 2003
BOSTON - President Bush blames the media for filtering out good news on Iraq. He says he does not even read newspapers. "The best way to get the news is from objective sources," Bush said in a Fox News interview. "And the most objective sources I have are people on my staff who tell me what's happening in the world." This is the same president who erases history itself. Mr. Bush's desire for us to become ostriches over the deaths and wounding of American soldiers in Iraq is but one more pathological act in sticking all of America's heads into the sand.
NEWS
By Arnold Packer | June 27, 2000
THE BALTIMORE region needs a good way to develop its work force if it is to prosper in the new century. Old-style academic transcripts and resumes are as outdated as the rusty towers of antiquated steel plants. But Career Transcripts (CT), a system of registering New Age skills developed at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies, offers a bridge between the old industrial economy and the new technological age. Employers want to know how well their workers can function in teams and how they plan, communicate, solve systemic problems and use technology.
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | November 10, 2003
BOSTON - President Bush blames the media for filtering out good news on Iraq. He says he does not even read newspapers. "The best way to get the news is from objective sources," Bush said in a Fox News interview. "And the most objective sources I have are people on my staff who tell me what's happening in the world." This is the same president who erases history itself. Mr. Bush's desire for us to become ostriches over the deaths and wounding of American soldiers in Iraq is but one more pathological act in sticking all of America's heads into the sand.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Former Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III has joined the criminal justice faculty at Stevenson University, the school announced today.  The move comes after much speculation about what arguably the city's most successful top cop in recent history would do after retiring this year. Bealefeld will serve as a full-time distinguished professional in criminal justice and instructor, teaching coursework for undergraduates and helping develop a center for criminal justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 7, 1999
Mission: To provide career development, employment and related social services to help people with special needs enjoy the dignity and benefits of work and a better quality of life. Goodwill Industries in the Baltimore area started in 1919 when the first factory was opened at Broadway Methodist Episcopal Church. Two indigent employees were hired to stencil and fold burlap bags that would be sent out to collect reclaimable household goods that could be sold. This cycle of donation, processing, resale and wages remains essentially intact today.
NEWS
By From staff reports | August 13, 1998
As part of a nationwide health initiative, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation announced yesterday a five-year, $2 million grant to Vision for Health Consortium of Baltimore, a coalition of providers that targets Sandtown-Winchester.Consortium officials said they plan to use the money to better care for the underserved, and will include the community's views on how care should be delivered. A supervisory body, made up mostly of residents, will oversee the project's effectiveness.The Baltimore coalition is one of 13 groups selected nationwide.
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