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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Md. Committee for Children, state agenciesSun Staff Writer | April 7, 1994
As women have surged into Maryland's work force, the state's child care system has struggled to keep pace, leading to a shortage of licensed spaces, and fees that can exceed the cost of a home mortgage.Those are among the findings of a new study by the Maryland Committee for Children Inc., which painted a bleak picture of the state's child care industry."Parents find it very hard to find high-quality day care" said Sandra J. Skolnik, the committee's executive director. "There's a major, desperate need for child care for children under the age 2."
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NEWS
September 18, 2014
A former Arizona state senator named Russell Pearce resigned as vice chairman of the state's Republican Party recently because he suggested that if he ran Medicaid, the first thing he'd do would be to put female recipients on birth control implants or require tubal ligation. Then he'd test all recipients for drugs and alcohol. If you want to reproduce or use drugs or alcohol, he reportedly told listeners on his radio show, "then get a job. " It's not surprising that a conservative Republican might perceive poor people as lazy and irresponsible, but the attack on Medicaid — the government-financed insurance program for the poor and working poor and, of course, the possibility of forced female sterility — was beyond the pale.
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | October 1, 1990
Bell Atlantic Corp., the parent company of the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. of Maryland, has selected The Prudential Insurance Co. of America to organize, implement and administer a new management health care system that will cover 5,200 unionized C&P workers and their families in the Baltimore area.The new system, which is known as a preferred provider organization, is the outgrowth of the labor agreement that ended a month-long strike in August 1989. Under the arrangement, employees can use specific physicians and hospitals and pay very little extra.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
The medical system that provides care to Maryland's veterans signed a one-year contract with Evergreen Health Care in Baltimore to offer primary health services to new patients, federal and co-op officials said Thursday. The $485,000 contract aims to cut down on wait times that had become some of the worst in the nation. A June audit found Central Maryland's veterans were waiting an average of 80 days to see a primary-care doctor for an initial visit, the fourth longest wait in the nation.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1991
SEATTLE -- The nation's governors approved a policy statement yesterday urging sweeping reform of the American health care system to make "health care affordable and available for all," but only after sharp partisan debate over whether to call for the Bush administration and Congress to act by 1994.The policy statement passed unanimously, reflecting broad agreement that there is a growing crisis in both the cost and the availability of health care, which the governors said was straining state budgets already pressed by the recession.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
An article in yesterday's Business section incorrectly reported the name of a doctor who founded the Maryland MultiSpecialty Medical Group and is trying to create a physician-controlled health care system. He is Dr. Ahsan S. Khan.* The Sun regrets the error.A Baltimore doctor has issued a call for colleagues to join a new company that is shaping up to be the area's largest physician-controlled health care system.Dr. Khan S. Ahsan, an eye, ear and nose specialist with 20 years' experience at Church and St. Agnes hospitals, is betting that in highly regulated Maryland, physician-controlled systems will be cheaper and more efficient than competitors.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | August 19, 2001
MARYLAND'S inattention to a disintegrating health care system could prove a big headache for elected leaders over the next few years. Everywhere you look on the health care front, there's trouble. Hospitals are curtailing delivery of care because of state-imposed price controls. Doctors are fleeing the state's Medicaid program because of abysmally low payments. Teaching hospitals are hurt by the state's low reimbursements for uninsured patients. Community psychiatric clinics are barely viable.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1999
Eisner Communications has been named the advertising agency of record to promote Johns Hopkins Medicine, an account that in past years has been valued at $2 million to $3 million in annual billings."
NEWS
September 4, 2012
The age of majority in Maryland is 21. That's when childhood and adolescence officially end. But just because a young person reaches that age doesn't mean he or she is prepared to undertake all the responsibilities of adulthood. And the difficulties faced by youths venturing out into the world for the first time are only compounded when they have grown up in foster care without a family to call their own. Few young people are really prepared to make their way independently at that age, even if they have been lucky enough to have loving parents, a stable home, a fine education and opportunities to participate in sports, social events and other activities.
NEWS
By Ruth R. Faden and Madison Powers | October 30, 2008
The election is less than a week away. Health care remains a key issue for most Americans, with the declining economy serving to underscore how important it is that the next president get health care right. Considerable ink and blog space have been devoted to explicating the details and expected outcomes of Sen. Barack Obama's and Sen. John McCain's health care plans. Armed with analyses from health economists, both campaigns are peppering last-minute speeches and ads with specific figures about how much money their health care plans would save you and how much their plans would cost.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Maryland will likely dump all or part of the state's health insurance exchange website and adopt Connecticut's system, a move that could make it the first state to abandon a dysfunctional site. Officials with Maryland's exchange plan to turn to the "Connecticut solution," which was developed largely by Deloitte Consulting LLC and considered among the most successful in enrolling consumers in private health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, said two sources with knowledge of the situation.
NEWS
By Martin O'Malley | January 11, 2014
Beyond the political debates over the Affordable Care Act is a bipartisan consensus about the future of our nation's health care system. Across the political spectrum, officials and experts agree that we must shift from a near exclusive focus on treating people when they get sick to a balanced approach that also promotes health and wellness. Such a shift will both reduce costs for families and small businesses and keep many Americans from dying of preventable causes. Our health care system's heavy reliance on "fee-for-service financing" generates lackluster outcomes, despite ever-increasing costs.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 30, 2013
It's Obamacare activation and government "shutdown" week in Washington, where the consequences of misplaced faith in government are everywhere. Still, "true believers" remain faithful that Obamacare will be the exception to government's past failures in achieving big goals. There are examples galore of government's inability to do things well and at reasonable cost, but that doesn't deter those who continue to believe government can solve every problem. The U.S. Postal Service wants to raise the cost of a first-class stamp from 46 cents to 49 cents in order to cover a "precarious financial condition.
HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Dr. Adam Kushner agreed to go to Syria last month to help in any way he was needed. And when the Baltimore surgeon got there, the work was waiting for him. In the hours before he arrived at a small hospital in the northern province of Aleppo, a nearby village had been attacked. He walked in to find rows of wounded, his new colleagues already at work stabilizing and treating them. "It was in the middle of a mass casualty," said Kushner, who visited Syria last month with the group Doctors Without Borders.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 21, 2013
My husband and I are just off a long weekend soloing with the Fabulous Mikey, perhaps the cutest 21/2 -year-old grandchild in the universe. And the smartest, too. After he was safely returned to the care of his mother - with no new scars or scabs but with some angry bug bites - we felt bereft. Mikey is just at the age when he can express the feelings bubbling up inside him - affection, delight, amazement and the need for a cuddle - and it is disarming. But we were also drained and exhausted and with fresh respect for grandparents who do this work full time.
NEWS
November 30, 2012
Millions of dollars have already been allocated to build a new jail for youth in Baltimore, but do we really need more jails ("Jackson joins rally against youth jail," Nov. 9)? The U.S. has the highest rate of incarceration in the world. We put more of our citizens in jail than any other country. Yet it wasn't always this way. In 1970, the rate of people in jail or prison was 161 for every 100,000 people in the U.S. Around the world today, this rate remains the norm. Yet by 2008, the U.S. was incarcerating an astonishing 754 individuals per 100,000 people.
NEWS
December 26, 2008
In 1993, Hillary Clinton, then the first lady, led an effort to reform the America's health care system that failed, in part because the public was excluded from secret planning sessions. Now, former Sen. Tom Daschle, who is shaping health policy proposals for President-elect Barack Obama, is hoping to do better. He is urging Americans to join in house parties this month to help develop ideas for new national policies to reduce health costs, boost the quality of care and get everyone coverage.
NEWS
August 16, 2009
Watching the news during the past week became a daily exercise in rubbernecking at the train wreck that was town hall democracy. At a certain point, it beame impossible to determine, and maybe immaterial, who came to meetings congressmen and senators held to discuss health care reform out of genuine concern and who came as part of an orchestrated show of force by one side or the other. Supporters and opponents of the Democratic reform plans said they felt insulted and misunderstood by the other side, and it was clear that little real debate or dialogue was going on. That's what happened Monday night when Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin held a town hall meeting at Towson University.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
The boy did not want to take a shower. After being asked to wash up, the 10-year-old began throwing glass cookware in the kitchen, turned on the stove and started a small fire, according to state records. His foster father wound up in the hospital with chest pains. The violent incident in Wicomico County was one of several detailed in documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun as it investigated foster home violence that gained increased attention after a 2-year-old's death this summer.
NEWS
September 16, 2012
For the second time in recent weeks, The Baltimore Sun has highlighted the Department of Human Resources' "Ready by 21" program as evidence of significant strides in how Maryland is looking at new ways of improving the lives of youth aging out of foster care ("Ready for life," Sept. 4). As providers of services for children placed by both by DHR and the Department of Juvenile Services, we couldn't help but be struck by one particularly profound statement in The Sun's editorial: "Most of all, what the state's foster care system needs more of [is]
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