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NEWS
July 4, 2012
President Barack Obama has succeeded in opening up a new legal specialty, namely interpreting and enforcing the incomprehensible health care reform law ("Romney: It's a penalty, not a tax," July 3). Certainly, the resulting maze will dismay the majority of the medical profession and their patients. The tax laws now are so complicated that the average layperson is totally baffled and for the most part has to consult tax experts who frequently also have problems, not to mention the IRS responders who try to give answers to citizens' questions.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 4, 2012
Nothing will trigger a conservative conversion experience in your children faster than a look at their first paychecks. When they see how much has been deducted for federal, state and local taxes, they suddenly realize they are against big government, the nanny state and, while they are at it, the filling of potholes. So it is no surprise that the Supreme Court decision on the Affordable Care Act last week restarted the generational conflict over just who is responsible for taking care of whom in the future.
NEWS
July 4, 2012
I wish to thank you for the article, "Reform moves ahead" (June 29). I believe the article did an excellent job portraying the facts regarding the Supreme Court decision. It is refreshing to hear a non-partisan synopsis of such a politically polarizing issue. It is on this note that I wanted to write to highlight the irony of the partisan politics surrounding the bill. The ACA is truly a politically neutral piece of legislation, drawing from ideas promulgated by both parties. In order to pass the law in the first place, compromises were made on both sides of the political spectrum.
NEWS
July 3, 2012
The recent Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Health Care Act surprised many. The reasoning given by the court for allowing the mandate is that it's a tax — and it's constitutional for Congress to pass a tax. While I believe that is a questionable interpretation at best, Americans now must buy health insurance or receive a tax penalty. In 2008, President Barack Obama said, "Health care should never be purchased with tax increases on Middle class families". During the lengthy debate on ACA he stressed that it was not a tax. It seems that President Obama's promises usually have an expiration date.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
States including Maryland can move with more certainty to insure their poor, and the federal government can require others to buy health coverage after the Supreme Court upheld President Barack Obama's landmark health care law Thursday. The highly anticipated decision is expected to add millions to the health insurance rolls, including Lashonda Edwards of Windsor Mill, who lost her coverage when she was laid off from her receptionist job in 2010. "I should be able to get the care I need," she said.
NEWS
June 28, 2012
By voting to uphold the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.erased concerns that the Supreme Court had become captive to a political rather than a legal agenda. As he promised to do during his confirmation hearings, Chief Justice Roberts in his decision released today crafted a narrow ruling that showed due deference to the other branches of government. In fact, his view of the most controversial element of the law, the so-called individual mandate - a requirement that individuals purchase health insurance or pay a penalty - cut through the political spin of Democrats in Congress and President Barack Obama.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | June 28, 2012
The Supreme Court decision upholding the Affordable Care Act's requirement that individuals purchase health insurance or pay a tax would seem to take the "single-payer" concept out of the national conversation about health care. Paradoxically, however, provisions of the president's health care reform initiative may ultimately instigate just such a single-payer system, akin to the British National Health Service. The vast majority of Americans believe that all citizens are entitled to some reasonable access to health care.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | June 27, 2012
The Supreme Court is expected to make its ruling on health care reform Thursday and there's plenty of speculation about what they will decide. We'll have to wait to find out, but until then Harris Interactive has polled everyday Americans to find out what they think about the controversial health bill that would give most Americans access to insurance. The poll found people's views varied depending on what type of health insurance they have: individual versus employer plans.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
Miriam Brand just graduated from the University of Maryland and does not have a job, but she does have health insurance. The 22-year-old diabetic is among the 2.5 million Americans who were allowed to stay on their parents' policies because of the federal health care reform law. "I was definitely very scared about getting insurance after college, never mind staying with my same doctors," she said. "I feel lucky my parents have good insurance and I can stay on it. " Brand joins the many young adults, children, seniors and others already benefiting from the Affordable Care Act who worry that the Supreme Court will strike down all or part of it. The court's term is nearing an end, and several decisions are expected, including one that could overturn the law. A challenge was brought by several states that believe its foundation violates the Constitution.
NEWS
By Monae Johnson | May 10, 2012
The Supreme Court's ruling on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, expected in June, will determine the future for countless Americans. Health care reform debates have elevated the plight of millions of uninsured Americans to the national consciousness. However, the physician workforce that would be needed to care for millions of newly insured people deserves equal attention. There is a growing shortage of primary care physicians in the U.S., and it has been forecasted for decades.
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