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NEWS
March 9, 1994
TOBACCO LOBBY -- Hard hit by report after report on health risks and impending tax increases, the tobacco industry has started to regain its composure and will fight for its life with a march on Washington today.The Tobacco Action Coalition, which claims 17,000 members, including tobacco company employees, farmers and smokers' rights groups, said that it would march to protest the Clinton administration's plan to triple the current 24-cent tax on a pack of cigarettes in order to fund health care.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Jenny Morgan headed a health care IT company for years before jumping to private equity, but she realized her passion wasn't investing in firms — it was being in the trenches, running one. So when the founder of Linthicum-based basys wanted to bring in a new CEO, she happily took the job in 2009. The timing — during the rough recession — wasn't ideal. But she says the benefits-administration software company made good use of the downtime and positioned itself for growth. Basys, which employs nearly 100 people, focuses on a very specific niche: helping "Taft-Hartley" funds, entities that manage union members' benefits, with their administration.
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NEWS
August 11, 2009
Sarbanes won't face voters Congressman John Sarbanes, you are a coward. I believe you forgot who elected you. In the article ("Debate rages on," Aug. 8), it is pointed out that you are conducting conference calls instead of meeting your voters in person. Heath care reform is a very important issue throughout our country, not only for our representatives, but for every American citizen. Hiding behind your telephone will do this issue no service. I am a concerned citizen, not part of an organized group, and I plan to be at the town hall meeting Senator Benjamin Cardin is conducting on Monday evening.
NEWS
March 20, 2014
I wonder why letter writer S. R. Cohen is so quick to attack neurosurgeon Ben Carson when he seems so unaware of Mr. Carson's beliefs ( "Ben Carson commits 'values malpractice,'" March 16). One would have to look far and wide to find anyone with greater moral clarity or finer track record than Dr. Carson. Dr. Carson is not against universal health care; he just knows there are ways to do it that shouldn't involve throwing the country over a fiscal cliff, after which there will be no benefits for anyone.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | December 23, 1993
Attorney General Janet Reno swept through Carroll yesterday, visiting the county health department and Mount Airy elementary and middle schools.The tour was part of a White House public relations push to focus attention on President Clinton's health care reform package, which will go before Congress next year.Other Cabinet officials were dispatched yesterday to day-care centers, hospitals and health care clinics in the greater Washington area and across the country.During her stops in Carroll County, Ms. Reno stressed the importance of preventive and early childhood care in the development of healthy children.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Democratic congressional leaders tacitly acknowledged yesterday that it will probably be impossible to achieve President Clinton's goal of sweeping health care reform this year and said that they would settle for only modest improvements.With no consensus in either the House or Senate for a Clinton-style overhaul and with time running out, Democratic leaders appear to be setting the stage for an alternative strategy.Instead of insisting on Mr. Clinton's universal coverage, the leaders are discussing smaller steps to allow the president and Congress to claim some progress -- without the major changes that have aroused opposition among special interests and wariness among voters.
NEWS
By Dr. John R. Burton | August 18, 2009
Our national experience with the Medicare program can provide guidance to the choices our legislators must make regarding health care reform. If one favors more or less government in health care, positive and negative lessons emerge from the nearly 50-year Medicare experience of providing universal health care coverage for all those age 65 and older. Medicare eliminated the fragmented, episodic and often dehumanizing care that many retired seniors were forced to seek through emergency departments or charitable sources because they no longer had coverage from an employer.
NEWS
By Robert Goldberg | November 18, 2013
After the federal health exchange faltered, President Barack Obama pointed to Maryland's Obamacare site, the Maryland Health Connection (MHC) as an example of a successful rollout. The president promised Obamacare's rollout would be smoother in "places like Maryland where governors are working to implement it rather than fight it. " Indeed, Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley - a likely presidential candidate in 2016 - even promised Maryland would "lead the nation" in making Obamacare work.
NEWS
November 14, 2013
The Latin phrase, Primum non nocere , or "first, do no harm," is one of the central tenets of the medical profession. It ought to be held as dear by those in Washington who suddenly want to "fix" Obamacare — they first should make sure they aren't doing more harm than good. The fix offered by President Barack Obama on Thursday — to allow insurers to keep recently "dropped" customers on their former health plans — is not likely to help many who stand to lose coverage, but it's probably the best the federal government can do at the moment.
NEWS
September 24, 2013
As readers of constitutional history know, one of the more attractive ideas the founders of this nation had was that the states would serve as "laboratories" of innovation that, in turn, other states could replicate. Andrea K. Walker's recent article about the new health care law set to go into effect next month spotlighted Maryland's exemplary attempts to undo misinformation that could leave millions of its citizens without health insurance, especially the poor ( "Confusion, misinformation hinder health outreach," Sept.21)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrea K. Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Carolyn Quattrocki may not be well known to most Marylanders, but she is a longtime Annapolis insider. So it's not surprising that the former special assistant to then-Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. and former deputy legislative officer under Gov. Martin O'Malley was chosen by the governor to lead the state's health reform efforts. As executive director of the Governor's Office of Health Care Reform, Quattrocki is overseeing the state's health reform efforts. Consumers can begin buying insurance on an exchange in October in time for the rollout of reform in January.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 15, 2013
In the immediate and lasting aftermath of the unspeakable evil of September 11, 2001, America united. The courage of our military heroes and the reputation, strength and resolve of the United States daily honors the victims of the attacks. May God bless and protect our nation and all who defend her. Facts and opinions Fact: Only 37 percent of young adults now believe Obamacare to be a good idea, according to a recent Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll. Opinion: How ironic that the reliably pro-Obama young set would turn so negative on the president's most notable legislative achievement once the reality of dramatically higher insurance rates began to hit home.
NEWS
August 28, 2013
U.S. Sen. Richard Burr, a Republican from North Carolina, told a reporter last month that threatening to shut down the federal government unless Congress agrees to defund Obamacare was "the dumbest idea I've ever heard. " He was absolutely right. It wasn't a sign of support for President Barack Obama's health care law but simply a recognition of reality. Yet, for his trouble, Senator Burr has been targeted by a right-wing advocacy group, the Senate Conservatives Fund, that has been running ads in North Carolina calling on voters to "send Richard Burr a message.
NEWS
By James F. Burdick | August 22, 2013
The glee with which Republicans greeted the delay in the employer coverage provision of the Affordable Care Act is heartless. Although it is politically motivated, such reveling will prove to be a political obstacle to Republican election chances in 2014. President Barack Obama's health care law is not going away. A groundswell of public opinion will welcome the reforms now under way to help correct the fundamental inequities in America's health care system. Celebrating the temporary delay in implementation of the ACA as a harbinger of the law's end callously ignores the many Americans whose health is suffering from lack of coverage for payment.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
In the wake of a ridiculous and predictably futile 40th attempt by the GOP-controlled House of Representatives to repeal Obamacare, I have become quite tired of all the misunderstanding and misrepresentation of attempts at health care reform perpetrated on both sides of the congressional aisle. Therefore, I believe it is time for someone to point out that the Affordable Care Act should be considered from a far different perspective. Is Obamacare a good law or a bad one? That debate is almost completely irrelevant.
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