Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCare Program
IN THE NEWS

Care Program

NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | September 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- At the popular Baltimore crab house Bo Brooks, owner Herm Hannan gladly provides health insurance to his full-time staff of 20. But he'd rather deal with a watermen's strike than President Clinton's plan to require coverage of all employees -- which would add two dozen seasonal workers to his insurance bill."
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 8, 2012
About 60 percent of the doctor practices that are participating in a special patient-oriented program from CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield have save on health care costs and improved care, the insurer said Thursday. Those were the goals of the patient-centered medical hom e iniitative, according to CareFirst, which launched the program in January 2011 as the state was forming its own similar program. The practices earned increased reimbursements from CareFirst based on the savings they achieved against the projected care costs for 2011 for the insurer's members.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer Staff writers Laura Lippman and Mark Bomster contributed to this article | December 16, 1992
Kenwood High School wants to keep teen-age mothers from dropping out -- by caring for their babies.When the school's new day care center opens in January, it will be the first of its kind in Baltimore County -- and officials hope it will be a national model for dealing with the myriad problems of teen-age motherhood.The center will be able to care for as many as 12 children up to 2 years old. The babies will get medical attention, and their young mothers will learn how to care for them and feed them.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | May 7, 2008
David Allan Minges, a 49-year-old veteran administrator for several public service nonprofits, has been hired as executive director of the Healthy Howard program, the Ulman administration's attempt to extend access to affordable health care to the uninsured. "I think it's a great opportunity, based on my experience working on new initiatives," Minges said yesterday. And since he's lost 50 pounds in five months through diet and exercise, he said, and lowered his blood pressure in the process, he's especially ready for the kind of preventive health care the program is aimed at. The program is to begin offering services to county residents Oct. 1. The intention is to enroll about 2,000 people in the first year, eventually extending the access to the roughly 20,000 county residents without health insurance.
NEWS
By Susan Sullam | December 30, 1990
Honolulu, Hawaii--With the majority of American mothers working outside the home, fewer children find Mom at home after school waiting with a glass of milk and a plate of cookies. Instead, many have become "latchkey" children coming home to empty houses.Hawaii -- which has the highest percentage in the nation o mothers in the work force -- is the first state to see the need for affordable, quality after-school care as a "hot" political issue that has to be addressed.While states across the nation are busy trying to maintain essential services during an era of financial belt-tightening, Hawaii has begun an ambitious statewide after-school care program that reaches youngsters in kindergarten through sixth grade whose parents either work or are in school.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 3, 1999
PORTLAND, Ore. -- Nearly five years ago, Oregon began putting an idea to work that seemed both harsh and humane: In return for health insurance paid by the government, the poor would be required to join health maintenance organizations and have their care rationed.Most tonsillectomies, infertility treatment, hernia surgery and removal of bunions would be denied. The program would support preventive and hospice care and, starting this month, doctor-assisted suicide, but rule out heroic intervention to stretch a life for a week or two.With that, the state calculated, it could afford to provide basic care for the poor -- the goal of universal coverage that eluded President Clinton four years ago. With rationing, Oregon became the sole U.S. outpost of an approach to care that is routine in most developed countries.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | June 4, 1991
THE GREATER Baltimore Youth Orchestra, cut out of a three-week summer tour of Italy because of Persian Gulf jitters, will instead play an all-American program to benefit a local health program for low-income children who are ineligible for medical assistance.The 65 players, ages 14 to 21 and mostly area high school students, will perform at 7 p.m. Sunday at Kraushaar Auditorium, Goucher College. Tickets are $5 and $3 for seniors. The players, based at Essex Community College, rehearse weekly under their director, Anne Harrigan.
NEWS
By Noam Neusner | December 3, 1990
It's no ordinary day at Windsor Farm Elementary School. Jake Dove, Rachel Yff and Todd Sackett are celebrating their birthdays with a cake, a clown's magic show and over 30 friends singing "Happy Birthday." Afterward, children run around the cafeteria, waving balloons in the air.School usually isn't this much fun, but in Windsor Farm's day-care program, having a good time is part of the curriculum. Students at the Anne Arundel County school play kickball and do arts and crafts, burning off a day's worth of childhood energy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 5, 2006
Eighteen months after the University of Colorado created a department to prepare undergraduates for a broad range of careers in health care: medicine, physical therapy, physician's assistant and more, that department has 1,200 students, making it the second-most-popular on campus. A similar program at State University of New York at Stony Brook on Long Island has grown to 370 graduating students last year from 35 four years ago. And at Marquette University, which in 1997 became among the first to offer a basic science degree in human health, the course of study has become more popular than any other.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,sun reporter | May 14, 2007
Sister Mary Gemma Neville, who established and led pastoral care programs, died of leukemia Wednesday at University of Maryland Hospital. She was 82. A deeply spiritual woman, she loved keeping journals, which eventually led her to write her own psalms and poetry. She thought of writing in her journal as corresponding with God. "If you have a favorite friend with whom you share your thoughts, you might write to them," she said in a 2005 Sisters of Bon Secours newsletter article. "With this, it's basically the same thing."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.