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NEWS
By Olivia Bobrowsky and Olivia Bobrowsky,olivia.bobrowsky@baltsun.com | August 6, 2009
In the wake of severe funding cuts, a Maryland health care program that aids uninsured residents will curtail its operations this month. The University of Maryland's fleet of traveling health clinics won't make stops anymore in Glen Burnie, Cumberland and in a few locations on the lower Eastern Shore. In all, the budget for the School of Nursing's Wellmobile will be cut in half. "We're going to work to design a program that fits within the budget constraints," said Wellmobile's director, Susan Antol, who's still not sure of all the changes.
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | September 29, 1992
Men and women in wheelchairs rallied outside the state health department yesterday in hopes of saving an attendant care program that helps keep 3,400 disabled Marylanders out of nursing homes.Three years ago, many of the same people were fighting to reform the program, which they said was under-funded and unsupervised, leaving clients vulnerable to abuse by the attendants paid to help them with the routines of daily living.Now, they're fighting just to keep the program. Despite its flaws, they say, it is all they have.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Staff Writer | March 12, 1992
The argument happened two years ago -- one of those emotional scenes played out daily by teen-agers and parents around the world. Now 16-year-old Bob DeFelice can't even remember what it was about.Bob can recall, though, how the clash ended: He stormed out and stewed during a long walk around the apartment complex where his family lives."That was the only time I ever thought of running away from home," he says. "But while I was walking, I started to think about what I had. I had parents who cared for me. And I was glad I had them.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | July 8, 1994
The state health department announced a plan yesterday to reduce spending on the relatively small number of people who account for more than half of its yearly Medicaid budget.Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini has enlisted the technical support of the University of Maryland at Baltimore County, which has assembled a staff to identify the costliest patients, find them appropriate health care and monitor the expense and quality of their care.The patients are generally those suffering from chronic maladies such as diabetes, cancer, AIDS and head injuries.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | June 2, 1993
Each had a retirement dream.For Robert Allen Pejeau, a General Motors engineer and amateur silversmith, it was to make jewelry in his basement workshop. His wife, Jeanne, longed to visit Spain. Her mother, Emma Benedict, wanted to watch the waves from her house on the ocean in Delaware.But now Alzheimer's disease has claimed the minds of Mr. Pejeau, 68, and Mrs. Benedict, 89. And Jeanne Pejeau, 65 and with a bad back, is caring for both of them at her home in Bethesda. It is an arduous job.At 5:30 a.m. she pads downstairs to turn over her bedridden mother and feed her juice, very slowly, so as not to choke her. Then she trudges back up the stairs and gives medicine to her husband, who needs help dressing, bathing, eating and using the toilet.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | February 9, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening's plan to abolish a program that gives disabled adults $157 a month plus health care coverage will push many of the 21,000 recipients onto the streets, where some surely will die, a legislative panel was told yesterday.Charities, advocates for the homeless, medical care providers, a drug addiction counselor, and several program recipients who said the modest benefits saved their lives all begged a House Appropriations subcommittee yesterday to restore the program.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | August 29, 1994
When Violet Whoolery took a nasty tumble down her front steps last October and broke her back, her family thought that she might have to abandon her Brooklyn Park home for a health care facility.But last week, the 79-year-old was in her bed at her home on Cresswell Road, surrounded by old family photos and cards. A nurse cared for her as her two daughters looked on and her great-grandchildren played in another room.Harbor Hospital Center's Home Health Agency program allowed Mrs. Whoolery's family to keep her at home near them, rather than at a nursing home or a hospital.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 26, 2012
Baltimore Medical System won a nearly half-million grant to develop a program for patients with both chronic diseases and behavior health needs. The $498,906 from CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield will be used to develop a unique-in-the-state turn on patient centered medical homes, a model where a team of providers work to achieve better quality care for lower costs by coordinating patient care. The participants in this program will get integrated care blending primary care, psychiatric care, low-threshold counseling and social services.
NEWS
December 27, 1990
The Anne Arundel County Department of Recreation and Parks' School-Aged Child Care program has openings throughout the county for children in grades one through six. After-school child care is provided through the Recreation and Parks Department in Severn elementary schools.The state-licensed child care programs provide a wide variety of activities which are supervised by certified staff. Children are involved in daily activity programs which include indoor and outdoor games, arts and crafts activities, special events, quiet/study time, individual and group activities and large/small motor skills activities.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
About 30 foster children in Baltimore stand to lose their social workers — for some the one constant in lives prone to turmoil — as the Annie E. Casey Foundation begins a new mission intended to extend its reach. The Baltimore-based foundation will close its Casey Family Services, a 36-year-old program that oversees the care of 400 foster children in seven states. Casey says the move will free up $18 million to $20 million a year to help increase adoptions and help other organizations that assist foster children.
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