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BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | October 14, 1992
The health care industry, once seemingly immune to market vagaries, has been in sick bay throughout this presidential election year. No matter which candidate wins, there will be changes in this longtime system whose pricing is now considered out of control by most Americans.Few health care legislative changes ever wind up as initially proposed, yet some degree of readjustment is unavoidable. The respective plans of Gov. Bill Clinton and President Bush have been the focus of most of the yearlong conjecture.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
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NEWS
By JOHN R. FRECE and JOHN R. FRECE,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1995
Maryland has been awarded a $200,000 U.S. Justice Department grant to set up a unit to investigate fraud in the health care industry, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. announced yesterday.The Justice Department wants Maryland "to develop a prototype statewide health care fraud prosecution unit capable of investigating and prosecuting all types of health care fraud" that other states can copy, Mr. Curran said.The effort will be aimed at those who commit fraud against private health care insurers, such as Blue Cross and Blue Shield, and the federal Medicare system.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan Peterson and Jonathan Peterson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2008
"I had the feeling that all wasn't well with my father," Claire Milne recalled. It was Christmastime in 2003, and Milne had flown from her London home to visit her 82-year-old father in Maryland. Milne noticed that her dad struggled to stay upright as he walked, early signs of a mysterious neurological condition. Over the next four years, Milne, 56, would travel across the Atlantic every few months to watch over him, standing by during hospital stays, offering support to her ailing stepmother as well.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - The Clinton administration will soon issue sweeping new rules to protect the privacy of medical records. But under pressure from the health care industry, officials say, they are backing off a proposal to give patients a broad new right to sue and recover damages for the improper disclosure of confidential information. Chris Jennings, the health policy coordinator at the White House, said President Clinton would issue the final rules, with the force of law, in the next few weeks.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- House Speaker Newt Gingrich called yesterday for an unprecedented congressional investigation of the booming managed care industry, the fastest growing and perhaps most controversial sector in the nation's health care system.Mr. Gingrich's unexpected call for hearings on a delivery system that now covers about 63 percent of all privately insured Americans was rousingly cheered by doctors, who increasingly are coming under the control of managed care networks.But the speaker's remarks stunned the health insurance industry, which dominates managed care plans.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | March 10, 1993
From the tragic explosion at the World Trade Center to persistent volatility tied to the economy and proposed tax changes, this has been a traumatic year for Wall Street.The health care industry, under fire from the Clinton administration for boosting costs unnecessarily, typifies investor disruption.Shareholders who bragged of the solid growth of their blue-chip holdings became mute after watching them take a nose dive amid talk of pending change. Other investors became hysterical, dumping all health care shares.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | September 8, 1993
FREDERICK -- It took a national health care crisis to jump-start HomeCall Inc., a tiny home health company that opened here 20 years ago as a specialty service to help older people with mundane tasks like window washing.But take off it did. Several years after it branched out into medical services, the company is growing as escalating health care costs have led insurers to push for shorter hospital stays, more outpatient surgery and alternative care at the same time the elderly population is growing.
NEWS
January 19, 1993
For anyone who anticipated quick action on President-elec Clinton's vow to deal with the country's health care crisis, a new report brings sobering news. According to the Commerce Department, health care spending rose last year to more than 14 percent of the nation's total economic output, which represents one out of every seven dollars in the economy. The increase follows a disturbing upward trend that will be repeated again this year, when health care costs are expected to rise by another 12 percent.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1995
Integrated Health Services Inc. churned out record revenues of $278.4 million in the second quarter, up 101 percent from a year ago, as it converted more health care beds to ones that are reimbursed by the government at a higher rate.The low-cost provider of health care services earned $13.9 million before extraordinary items, up 104 percent from a year ago. Earnings per share before extraordinary items were up 35 percent, to 54 cents a share.This is the 18th consecutive quarter that the Owings Mills-based company has chalked up record revenues and earnings, officials said.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun Reporter | January 27, 2008
By now you surely know the U.S. health care system is massively messed up. But the question is why. A few years ago, health journalist Shannon Brownlee was going through some global health statistics. She noticed that even as U.S. health care costs were rising steadily, Americans were not getting healthier. How to explain this apparent paradox? Brownlee became fascinated and began to collect data in search of answers. The result is Overtreated: Why Too Much Medicine Is Making Us Sicker and Poorer, her analysis of how American health care has failed.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2003
A news conference scheduled for this morning at City Hall was canceled yesterday after the union that was to be host announced that it would take aim at Johns Hopkins Hospital as "the Wal-Mart of the health care industry" and Mayor Martin O'Malley backed out of the event. Service Employees International Union District 1199E-DC in Baltimore issued a news release that described the participation of the mayor and U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat who also leads the Congressional Black Caucus, in an event marking today as International Human Rights Day. SEIU is negotiating a contract with Johns Hopkins, where it represents more than 1,500 workers in housekeeping, maintenance, nutrition and other areas.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 13, 2002
WASHINGTON - Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski of Maryland is a prime target of a last-ditch bid to win Senate approval for oil drilling in the Alaska wildlife refuge, with supporters offering in return to help pay health care costs of steel-industry retirees. Supporters hope to secure the backing of a half-dozen or so steel-state Democrats, including Mikulski, before the Senate votes on the highly contentious proposal to drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The vote is expected late next week.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2001
Every day when Yvonne Minge goes home, she knows she's helped somebody grow. Maybe it was the 3-year-old boy who needed to learn how to wash his hands, or the 4-year-old girl who can now distinguish red from blue. Or it could be the twenty-something staffer and mother who completed her coursework in early childhood education because Minge and her rapidly growing Bright Beginnings Children's Centers paid for the course and offered free child care while the mom went to school. "One of my goals in life is to help people move forward in life and to make them feel special," said Minge, who in two years has opened three child care centers in Howard County that teach more than 170 children.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2001
Every day when Yvonne Minge goes home, she knows she's helped somebody grow. Maybe it was the 3-year-old boy who needed to learn how to wash his hands, or the 4-year-old girl who can now distinguish red from blue. Or it could be the twenty-something staffer and mother who completed her coursework in early childhood education because Minge and her rapidly growing Bright Beginnings Children's Centers paid for the course and offered free child care while the mother went to school. "One of my goals in life is to help people move forward in life and to make them feel special," said Minge, who in two years has opened three child care centers in Howard County that teach more than 170 children.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - The Clinton administration will soon issue sweeping new rules to protect the privacy of medical records. But under pressure from the health care industry, officials say, they are backing off a proposal to give patients a broad new right to sue and recover damages for the improper disclosure of confidential information. Chris Jennings, the health policy coordinator at the White House, said President Clinton would issue the final rules, with the force of law, in the next few weeks.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1994
Integrated Health Services Inc. said yesterday it will sign agreements to lease and run 43 long-term care facilities in 10 states. The expansion would increase the company's nursing home beds by 20 percent and further secure its presence in the fast developing health care markets of Florida and Texas.The facilities, with 5,275 beds, had combined revenues of $134 million last year. The transaction is expected to result in higher earnings this year and next, the company said. Integrated's earnings rose 69 percent to $15.4 million for the year ended Dec. 31 on revenues of $282 million.
NEWS
By David Conn and Sandy Banisky and David Conn and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writers | September 20, 1993
For 30 years, Dr. Joshua R. Mitchell III was a sole practitioner, running his own family practice in West Baltimore. This year, rattled by the health care reform tremors building in Maryland and the nation, he gave up his independence and threw himself into the sea of "managed care."Dr. Mitchell, 63, a past president of the Maryland Academy of Family Physicians, signed up to receive patients from four managed care companies. He did it, he said, "to protect myself.""The solo practitioner is going to go the way of the country doctor," Dr. Mitchell said, and independent physicians can't hold their own against an increasingly integrated health care industry.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1998
Decreased Medicare reimbursements are squeezing the agencies that provide home nursing, putting pressure on smaller agencies and accelerating a trend toward consolidation."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1998
For HCIA, there is before the LBA deal and after the LBA deal.HCIA, a Baltimore health data company, bought LBA Health Care Management Inc. of Denver in July 1996 for $130 million.Before the deal, things were heady.Fueled by internal growth and acquisitions, revenue for the four quarters before the announcement of the LBA deal was 55 percent higher than in the year-earlier period. Profitability was improving.And the stock price was on a steep climb; from an initial offering at $14 a share in February 1995, the price tripled in less than a year.
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