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NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | April 30, 1991
More than 125 disabled activists used their wheelchairs to block the intersection of Security Boulevard and Woodlawn Drive yesterday during the afternoon rush hour to demand more federal money for aides to help handicapped people live at home.Members of American Disabled for Attendant Programs Today (ADAPT) forced police to divert traffic around the busy intersection in western Baltimore County for more than three hours.County police closed the eastbound exit ramp from the Beltway to Security Boulevard to prevent traffic from backing up on the Beltway, said police spokesman E. Jay Miller.
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NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2005
Anne Arundel Medical Center has been ranked among the nation's top 100 hospitals by an Illinois health care data firm. Compiled annually by the Evanston-based firm Solucient, the list ranks hospitals for their achievement in four areas: patient care, operations, financial performance and community service. For its 12th annual survey, released last week, Solucient examined more than 6,000 hospitals nationwide. Of them, Anne Arundel Medical Center was the only large Maryland hospital (more than 250 beds)
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NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | December 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Nineteen-year-old Danita Hill jumped at the chance in July to work at the Health Care Financing Administration in Woodlawn, which participates in a popular federal program to give disadvantaged high school and college students job experience and pay at federal agencies."
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 27, 1995
About 100 federal employees joined a union demonstration at the Social Security Administration headquarters in Woodlawn yesterday, demanding that workers furloughed nine days ago by the budget stalemate be permited to return to work.As union protests go, it was unusual. The target wasn't the agency for which protesters work. It was Presidents Clinton and Congress, whose impasse forced the layoff of about 280,000 people who work for agencies that lack budget authority. And, the message was, "We want to work."
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON | May 1, 1991
Hortonville, New York. The average nursing-home resident receives less than 3 hours of care a day. That's what Robert L. and Rosalie A. Kane of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health wrote in a February 28 editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine.The federal Health Care Financing Administration, which doles out Medicare and Medicaid dollars to nursing homes across the country, gave them over $20 billion last year. These institutions charge up to $60,000 a year for a resident's care -- three hours' worth a day, as it turns out.That's potentially over $50 an hour -- a mighty expensive fee for the kind of care the typical nursing-home resident gets: a chance to lie in your own waste through the night, getting dressed only when nursing-home staff -- not you -- choose; getting tied into a wheelchair and pumped full of drugs to keep you quiet; rolled into an out-of-the-way place in the hall to watch nurses' aides trot up and down with dirty laundry and pills, as a TV blares somewhere in the distance.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Government financial experts have told the White House that President Clinton's health-care plan may require $100 billion to $150 billion a year in new public and private spending, depending on the scope of benefits guaranteed to all Americans.Several administration officials contend that those numbers are too high and are urging the financial experts to reduce their estimates. So far, they have refused to do so.The estimates, coming at a time when Congress is anxious about new taxes needed to pay for a reorganization of the health care system, are contained in confidential work papers from the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | June 1, 1991
The race to select the location and developers for a proposed $97 million building to house the federal Health Care Financing Administration entered the backstretch yesterday as Baltimore officials picked a team of local favorites to represent the city's interests in the bidding process.Baltimore's Center City-Inner Harbor Management Inc. said yesterday that it pared down an original field of 21 contestants to one finalist: a joint venture between the Rouse Co. of Columbia, Baltimore's Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. and developer Daniel P. Henson III, also of Baltimore.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 27, 1995
About 100 federal employees joined a union demonstration at the Social Security Administration headquarters in Woodlawn yesterday, demanding that workers furloughed nine days ago by the budget stalemate be permited to return to work.As union protests go, it was unusual. The target wasn't the agency for which protesters work. It was Presidents Clinton and Congress, whose impasse forced the layoff of about 280,000 people who work for agencies that lack budget authority. And, the message was, "We want to work."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Government financial experts have told the White House that President Clinton's health-care plan might require $100 billion to $150 billion a year in new public and private spending by government, business and consumers, depending on the scope of benefits guaranteed to all Americans.Several administration officials say that estimate is too high and are urging that it be reduced, which the financial experts have refused to do.The estimates, coming at a time when Congress is anxious about new taxes needed to pay for a reorganization of the health-care system, are contained in confidential work papers from the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform.
NEWS
June 14, 1993
Canada health planThe Evening Sun (May 3) and other sources have reported that government experts predict that President Clinton's health care plan may cost between $100 billion and $150 billion annually.Although health care reform is certainly needed, increased spending is neither desirable nor necessary.The United States already spends far more per person on health care than any other country in the world, and yet we are the only industrialized nation except South Africa that doesn't guarantee universal access to health care to all citizens.
NEWS
By DAVID EWING DUNCAN | April 12, 1995
The word is that health reform died last year because private industry is reforming itself.If only it were true.What's really happening is far more alarming as several trends in health care track across a grid like roaring locomotives on a collision course. Even Speaker Newt Gingrich admitted as much in a speech to the National Hospital Association. Insisting ''we need to rethink our health system,'' Mr. Gingrich warned that current cost trends will result in a ''financial crash.''Yet Republicans continue to behave -- in the words of Bob Dole last spring -- as if ''there is no health-care crisis.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- His health care bill battered by business opposition, President Clinton signaled to key senators yesterday that he's willing to consider alternatives to his formula for requiring employers to pay most of their workers' medical insurance.Mr. Clinton's one-hour meeting with Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y., the Senate Finance Committee chairman, and Sen. Bob Packwood, R-Ore., the committee's ranking Republican, provided the faint hope that a compromise was still possible.Mr.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | December 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Nineteen-year-old Danita Hill jumped at the chance in July to work at the Health Care Financing Administration in Woodlawn, which participates in a popular federal program to give disadvantaged high school and college students job experience and pay at federal agencies."
NEWS
June 14, 1993
Canada health planThe Evening Sun (May 3) and other sources have reported that government experts predict that President Clinton's health care plan may cost between $100 billion and $150 billion annually.Although health care reform is certainly needed, increased spending is neither desirable nor necessary.The United States already spends far more per person on health care than any other country in the world, and yet we are the only industrialized nation except South Africa that doesn't guarantee universal access to health care to all citizens.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Government financial experts have told the White House that President Clinton's health-care plan might require $100 billion to $150 billion a year in new public and private spending by government, business and consumers, depending on the scope of benefits guaranteed to all Americans.Several administration officials say that estimate is too high and are urging that it be reduced, which the financial experts have refused to do.The estimates, coming at a time when Congress is anxious about new taxes needed to pay for a reorganization of the health-care system, are contained in confidential work papers from the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Government financial experts have told the White House that President Clinton's health-care plan may require $100 billion to $150 billion a year in new public and private spending, depending on the scope of benefits guaranteed to all Americans.Several administration officials contend that those numbers are too high and are urging the financial experts to reduce their estimates. So far, they have refused to do so.The estimates, coming at a time when Congress is anxious about new taxes needed to pay for a reorganization of the health care system, are contained in confidential work papers from the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform.
NEWS
By DAVID EWING DUNCAN | April 12, 1995
The word is that health reform died last year because private industry is reforming itself.If only it were true.What's really happening is far more alarming as several trends in health care track across a grid like roaring locomotives on a collision course. Even Speaker Newt Gingrich admitted as much in a speech to the National Hospital Association. Insisting ''we need to rethink our health system,'' Mr. Gingrich warned that current cost trends will result in a ''financial crash.''Yet Republicans continue to behave -- in the words of Bob Dole last spring -- as if ''there is no health-care crisis.
NEWS
February 6, 1992
Whoa, Goldstein!Editor: The Jan. 27 letter from Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein regarding the method for distributing the proposed increase in the piggyback income tax is misleading in two respects.First, unlike Sens. John Pica and Barbara Hoffman's bill, Gov. William Donald Schaefer's bill would distribute a portion of the piggyback income tax on the basis of wage data provided by the Department of Economic and Employment Development. The department has been collecting this information for years.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | May 18, 1992
In the year of the detested and timid politician, Minnesota's Republican governor and Democratically controlled legislature have done something rather amazing.Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.
NEWS
February 6, 1992
Whoa, Goldstein!Editor: The Jan. 27 letter from Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein regarding the method for distributing the proposed increase in the piggyback income tax is misleading in two respects.First, unlike Sens. John Pica and Barbara Hoffman's bill, Gov. William Donald Schaefer's bill would distribute a portion of the piggyback income tax on the basis of wage data provided by the Department of Economic and Employment Development. The department has been collecting this information for years.
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