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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- At a time when most of the momentum around health care reform seems to be directed toward slowing down and trimming back the costs of the new insurance program, a consensus is quietly building for one expensive new benefit.Home health care coverage for the elderly and disabled, which only recently seemed like a luxury Congress could not afford, is now given a reasonable chance of being included in some form in the version of the health care bill that comes up for a final vote this fall.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Workers for Giant Food and Safeway stores in the Baltimore-Washington region voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to ratify a three-year labor contract that preserves health benefits and raises wages over three years. Leaders with the United Food and Commercial Workers characterized the contract as one of the best in the grocery business at a time when companies are scaling back benefits and offering one-time bonuses instead of wage increases. Giant and Safeway, the Baltimore area's biggest supermarket chains, said the agreement will enable them to stay competitive in the changing retail landscape.
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NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,sun reporter | January 10, 2007
In an early push to get health care at the top of the legislative agenda in Annapolis, a broad coalition that includes AARP and labor officials announced yesterday an advertising and direct-mail campaign for a plan that would double Maryland's cigarette tax and use the proceeds to expand coverage for the uninsured. AARP, the lobby for older Americans, launched a 60-second commercial that will air for 10 days on three area radio stations, while the 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East is mailing 350,000 leaflets urging recipients to return an enclosed card to their state representatives.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
Baltimore officials have dropped more than 1,600 spouses, children and others from city health care coverage after workers failed to fill out forms to prove they were eligible dependents. The city purged the health care rolls after questions were raised about the eligibility of some dependents. The move will save Baltimore about $6.5 million a year, officials said. But critics say some city workers were unfairly denied health insurance for their families and now can't afford to pay for doctor visits.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | May 12, 1993
At age 65, Bill O'Reilly says he's comfortable with his health care coverage. But many of his fellow seniors aren't, which is why the Maryland City resident makes the trip to Glen Burnie's Pascal Senior Center every week.Mr. O'Reilly is a volunteer counselor who helps people facing health insurance woes. He and 18 other counselors are part of a county Department of Aging initiative called Health Insurance Counseling Assistance Program."When we get into medical care, it gets a little hairy," he said.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2003
The General Assembly passed legislation last night to help Bethlehem Steel Corp. retirees who are not old enough for Medicare to obtain state-backed insurance coverage. Under the legislation, Bethlehem retirees between the ages of 55 and 64 would be able to obtain insurance under the Maryland Health Insurance Plan. The insurance would be open to retirees regardless of their medical histories and would be available July 1. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is expected today to sign the bill, which was passed by the House 132 to 0. Coverage would benefit about a quarter of the steelmaker's 20,000 retirees and dependents in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | October 27, 2009
Health care advocates said Monday that they had met their goal of adding 10,000 Baltimore residents to Medicaid rolls since the state expanded coverage and lowered eligibility requirements last year. Vincent DeMarco, president of the Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative, said that statewide, 50,000 adults have benefited from the new state health care expansion since it took effect in July of last year, and that 50,000 more children who were eligible for insurance but not yet covered have been enrolled since 2007 because of the O'Malley administration's outreach program and efforts by health care advocates.
NEWS
By Peter L. Beilenson and Vincent DeMarco | June 16, 2003
MARYLAND HEALTH Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini recently issued a clarion call for universal health care in our state, and if Marylanders listen, we will all be healthier for it. This is especially true for the more than 600,000 Marylanders who have no health care coverage at all and the more than 200,000 seniors on Medicare who have no prescription drug coverage. Thanks to Mr. Sabatini, the question now is no longer whether Maryland will guarantee quality, affordable health care for all of its people, but how we are going to do it. Over the past four years, the Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative, a coalition of hundreds of religious, community, labor, business and health care groups from across the state, has worked hard to answer the "how" question.
NEWS
By Vincent DeMarco | December 2, 2007
The people of Maryland should be very proud of their leaders for making 2007 the year of public health in Maryland, which despite its wealth has traditionally been among the worst states at providing health insurance for poor adults. The General Assembly this year passed four new laws, which will: Require all workplaces and public places to be smoke-free. Increase the state tobacco tax by $1 per pack. Allow young adults to stay on their parents' insurance plans. Provide health care coverage for many lower-income adults.
BUSINESS
By Marilyn Geewax and Marilyn Geewax,Cox News Service | February 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Wal-Mart Stores Inc. chief executive Lee Scott joined one of his toughest critics, labor leader Andrew L. Stern, yesterday to unveil a political campaign to promote universal health care coverage. The two longtime antagonists are helping lead a coalition of labor and business leaders in trying to get Congress to end the nation's reliance on employer-backed health insurance and develop a system for providing universal low-cost coverage within five years. "What unites us here today is our shared belief that it will be a far greater America when we get affordable health care for all Americans," Stern, president of the Service Employees International Union, said at a news conference at a Capitol Hill hotel.
NEWS
By Anthony Brown and Joshua Sharfstein | June 28, 2012
Soon after President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010, Maryland began to implement this law to meet the needs of our families, communities and businesses. Today's historic Supreme Court decision allows our work to continue moving forward without interruption. As a result of the Affordable Care Act, tens of thousands of young adults in Maryland have been able to stay on their parents' insurance. Moms and dads of children with chronic illness have not had to worry about arbitrary denials of coverage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
One could forgive viewers if they walked away confused after watching CNN's early coverage of the Supreme Court's health care decision. The network, itself, was confused. Within minutes after the decision was announced, CNN was hitting the airwaves with four different versions of what the ruling said. First, the network reported the justices had killed the individual mandate provision of the law -- perhaps its most controversial aspect. Then, CNN reported the law "may have been upheld.
NEWS
November 18, 2010
Andy Harris probably learned a lesson from the flap caused by his questions about the health care benefits he'll enjoy as a congressman in a supposedly confidential briefing — but likely not the right one. Mr. Harris, a Republican and a physician who was elected this month to represent Maryland's 1st District, will surely chalk this one up as a painful object lesson in the "gotcha" culture of Washington, where reporters were eager to pounce on...
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | October 27, 2009
Health care advocates said Monday that they had met their goal of adding 10,000 Baltimore residents to Medicaid rolls since the state expanded coverage and lowered eligibility requirements last year. Vincent DeMarco, president of the Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative, said that statewide, 50,000 adults have benefited from the new state health care expansion since it took effect in July of last year, and that 50,000 more children who were eligible for insurance but not yet covered have been enrolled since 2007 because of the O'Malley administration's outreach program and efforts by health care advocates.
NEWS
September 7, 2009
On Labor Day, workers are struggling As we celebrate Labor Day, we must also recognize that a large segment of Baltimore's workforce is struggling to provide for themselves and their families. One in five workers in Baltimore is employed in health care. But health care workers make up a large percentage of Baltimore's uninsured working poor. They earn some of the lowest wages for urban health care workers in the country, and many struggle to pay for health care coverage for themselves and their families, or just go without.
NEWS
By Dr. John R. Burton | August 18, 2009
Our national experience with the Medicare program can provide guidance to the choices our legislators must make regarding health care reform. If one favors more or less government in health care, positive and negative lessons emerge from the nearly 50-year Medicare experience of providing universal health care coverage for all those age 65 and older. Medicare eliminated the fragmented, episodic and often dehumanizing care that many retired seniors were forced to seek through emergency departments or charitable sources because they no longer had coverage from an employer.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | July 24, 1994
All Americans should have the right to health coverage, and it is everyone's moral responsibility to guarantee that right, a leader of a national religious coalition told a group of parishioners in Savage last week."
NEWS
By Charles Johnson, Petey Green and Walter Middlebrooks | May 31, 2009
As presidents of three Maryland black chambers of commerce, our goals include promoting economic stability while eradicating barriers to growth within Maryland's black- and minority-owned business community. But it is difficult to promote economic stability while insurance costs are skyrocketing. The Maryland Health Care for All! plan ( www.healthcareforall.com) offers a solution that is both fair and practical. Two-thirds of Maryland workers enjoy company-sponsored health insurance, but our members are being forced to cut back on these benefits.
NEWS
By Charles Johnson, Petey Green and Walter Middlebrooks | May 31, 2009
As presidents of three Maryland black chambers of commerce, our goals include promoting economic stability while eradicating barriers to growth within Maryland's black- and minority-owned business community. But it is difficult to promote economic stability while insurance costs are skyrocketing. The Maryland Health Care for All! plan ( www.healthcareforall.com) offers a solution that is both fair and practical. Two-thirds of Maryland workers enjoy company-sponsored health insurance, but our members are being forced to cut back on these benefits.
NEWS
January 3, 2009
Hospitals often wind up with stacks of unpaid bills because of the lack of universal health insurance coverage in this country. And certainly, no one likes to receive a letter or call from a bill collector or go to court over a hospital charge. Yet hospitals can only survive if bills get paid. That was one of several key points missing from The Baltimore Sun's series "In Their Debt" (Dec. 21-23). At the same time, hospitals aren't anxious to litigate. Few disputes make it to court: less than 0.5 percent of all hospital bills.
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