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NEWS
October 27, 1993
The Manchester Board of Zoning Appeals granted permission Monday for two Manchester families to operate home day care centers, said Miriam DePalmer, the town's assistant zoning administrator.Steve and Kathy Sheppard, of 2814 Bachman Road, were granted approval to care for up to eight children.Janet and Jim Young, of 3305 Augusta Road, were given approval to care for up to five children.Ms. DePalmer said the centers will be subject to the usual licensing procedures and will have to file copies of required paperwork with the town.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
At Cathy Rees' yoga class, you won't see anyone attempt a downward-facing dog — many participants are in wheelchairs, and almost all of them suffer from dementia. Instead, Rees has adapted the principles of yoga, which aims to align the body's seven chakras, or points of energy, to the abilities of the residents of Copper Ridge, a center for dementia care in Sykesville. Her yoga class, now in its fourth month, is an experiment of sorts. A handful of studies have suggested that yoga can be used to improve the overall physical and mental well-being of dementia patients, so Rees wants to craft a dementia-specific yoga program that can be studied and refined by researchers.
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NEWS
By Mike Burns | March 29, 1998
THE ROOF fell in, figuratively, on the Carroll Child Care Centers in Westminster this month.Literally, it was the abrupt finding of a structural problem with the roof in its new building that forced the center to close for two weeks of repair.More than 90 youngsters (and their anxious parents) faced the daunting challenge of finding an alternative care-provider or taking off from work on short notice.The scramble for help from baby sitters, friends, relatives and even scarcely known neighbors was frantic.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Lockheed Martin, a government contractor best known for its fighter jets, formally opened a health care center in Baltimore County Wednesday, part of a bid to expand the company's role in the medical sector. While health care services still represent a small portion of Lockheed's business, company representatives said they see the opportunity to apply Lockheed's technology and security background to the rapidly increasing amount of data entering the medical field. "We've done really large information systems in other domains, like defense intelligence … and health care is, I don't want to say just another domain, but it's going through the same pains and revolutions that we've seen in our other businesses," said chief scientist Michael Hultner.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | January 7, 2007
The Carroll Child Care Centers Inc. in Westminster is trying to launch a fundraising campaign, after the United Way of Central Maryland unexpectedly denied the nonprofit day care center a $71,000 grant to serve low-income families. To brainstorm ideas and connect the center with donors, the Community Foundation of Carroll County is sponsoring a brown bag luncheon Friday for the center. "This is doable. It's not like they're trying to raise $1 million," said Audrey Cimino, the foundation's executive director.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 1997
Accredited child care centers tend to offer high-quality care, but parents should avoid taking accreditation alone as a sign of excellence, a study released last week said.The report on the two-year study, conducted at 92 child care centers in the California communities of Palo Alto, Santa Cruz and San Jose, praised the accreditation process by the National Association for the Education of Young Children as an effective method of improving the quality of care.But the study noted that nearly two in five accredited centers were rated mediocre by researchers, and it urged the association to strengthen its criteria.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
The Howard County Planning Board voted unanimously yesterday to recommend rejection of what would be, if approved, one of the county's largest child care facilities.Tutor Time Learning Systems Inc., based in Boca Raton, Fla., wants to build a 10,466-square-foot facility on 2 1/2 acres at the northwest corner of Old Frederick Road and Rogers Avenue in Ellicott City. The facility would have two outdoor play areas -- one of them larger than 11,000 square feet -- and operate from 6: 30 a.m. to 6: 30 p.m. weekdays.
NEWS
By Sylvia Wood and Sylvia Wood,ALBANY TIMES UNION | March 11, 2001
TROY, N.Y. - As a licensed registered nurse, Mary Ellen Manzella could get a job earning up to $50,000 a year. Instead, she spends her days with the babies at day care center earning nearly half that. Manzella said her fondness for children keeps her working for less money than she might otherwise earn. "I've just always loved children," she said. "We sit down on the floor and play a lot. What a great job." Many day care centers would love to find more people like Manzella: caring, educated and willing to forgo a decent salary for work they enjoy.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
The Ruppersberger administration has abandoned plans to hire private operators to run Baltimore County's three adult day care centers, opting instead to close them and pay participants to go elsewhere.But the new plan has upset some participants' families even more than the first one."This program was the greatest thing that ever happened in Baltimore County," said Louis Crumley, whose 89-year-old mother-in-law attends the Dundalk center. "There are 150 people in dire need. There was no reason to do this."
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | July 19, 1993
Curtis Duppins, 5, makes scary claws that drip from his fingers at the Bartholomew day care center in Westminster -- oblivious to the fact that the center is now accredited by the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs.Curtis knows that goop made from cornstarch and water "feels like glue" and makes excellent claws.Kathryn Baldwin, 5, knows that what everyone does at the center is play and eat snacks and have lunch and take naps.The school won accreditation in late March. The status means nothing to 3- to 6-year-olds, but it can help parents choose a good child care program, according to the academy.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Richard Dean calls it the "golden hour," when 3- to 4-year-old children take in literacy and social skills like a favorite snack. Harnessing the golden hour for underprivileged children in Columbia's Owen Brown community, Dean said, was among the reasons he and other members of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Columbia launched a day care center eight years ago. Dean is president of the Cradlerock Children's Center, a nonprofit facility...
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Mold has closed a child care center at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and a floor of the McKeldin Library at the University of Maryland, College Park. The UMBC child care facility, operated by the Y of Central Maryland, shuttered Wednesday night because of a mold problem caused by water leaking between walls, officials said, leaving dozens of families without child care. "We arrived at the decision to close with the safety of the children in mind, and we are very sorry for the impact it will have on the families affected," Lynne Schaefer, vice president for finance and administration, said in an email to the university community Thursday.
NEWS
August 7, 2013
Upper Chesapeake Health's Ambulatory Care Center in Bel Air has been named after long-time Harford County philanthropists Shirley and Ralph Klein, the medical system announced Tuesday. It will be called the Klein Ambulatory Care Center. According to the announcement, the naming is a result of the "extraordinary generosity of the Klein family to UCH over the years and, most recently, to its most recent fundraising effort ­ Hope and Healing Close to Home: The Campaign for The Cancer Center at Upper Chesapeake Health.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
Margaret W. "Mardie" Robinson, a homemaker and volunteer, died Thursday from respiratory failure at Roland Park Place. She was 101. The daughter of a lumber company executive and a homemaker, Margaret Wilson Wood was born on Forest Road, now Keswick Road, in Roland Park, and was later raised on Woodlawn Road. Mrs. Robinson was the sister of H. Graham Wood, the noted Chesapeake Bay steamboat historian and author, who died in 1998. After graduating from Roland Park Country School in 1931, she worked as an administrator in a dental office and later for Anne Weems Williams, a Roland Park interior decorator.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical System is planning to build a $50 million ambulatory care center, for outpatient services, on the campus of Maryland General Hospital. Initial plans for the seven-story structure were revealed at the city's architectural review board Thursday, said Mark Wasserman, senior vice president for external affairs and development for the medical system. The building will be constructed on a now vacant lot at the intersection of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Linden Avenue in midtown Baltimore, he said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
A woman driving a four-door Mercury eastbound on Dogwood Road in Woodlawn on Saturday swerved to avoid an accident, drove through a parking lot and crashed into an empty early learning and day care center, Baltimore County police said. The woman was transported to a local hospital with minor injuries after the accident at the Joy of Learning Center in the 6600 block of Dogwood Road shortly before 1 p.m., Cpl. John Wachter said. After the crash, most of the car was inside the learning center.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1999
It was a typical problem for working parents.As Lisa Zelinsky's maternity leave came to an end, the Ellicott City mother and her husband, James, knew they would need day care for their 10-month-old son, Matthew. With older son Eric beginning first grade at Rockburn Elementary school this fall, a home-based care provider near the school would be ideal, they decided.Instead of flipping through the Yellow Pages, the Zelinskys turned to Howard County Locate: Child Care, a free counseling service that refers parents and parents-to-be to day care centers and people licensed to care for children in their homes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
Doris W. Wagner, a former registered nurse who helped plan and design Carroll County's first adult day care center, died Sept. 11 of meningioma at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The longtime Mount Airy resident was 86. The daughter of a wallpaper hanger and a seamstress, Doris Walkling was born in Gamber and raised on Smithwood Avenue in Catonsville. She was a 1944 graduate of Catonsville High School and earned her nursing degree two years later from St. Agnes Hospital School of Nursing.
EXPLORE
July 9, 2012
The Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Medicine has acquired Parris Castoro Eye Care Center, an outpatient eye and laser surgical center that has served the Bel Air and Havre de Grace communities for more than 35 years. "As an internationally-renowned eye institution that specializes in the diagnosis and management of complex medical and surgical eye disease; and serves as a preeminent provider of routine eye care and refractive, optical, cosmetic and eye trauma service, we care for many critical patients from Baltimore city and surrounding areas," Dr. Peter J. McDonnell, director and William Holland Wilmer Professor of Ophthalmology at the Wilmer Eye Institute, said in a press release.
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