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Cardiovascular Disease

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September 23, 1991
Mary L. Grau, 89, a retired educator who held supervisory positions in Harford and Montgomery counties, died last Monday at the Mission Manor Nursing Home in Albuquerque, N.M., of cardiovascular disease.2 Survivors include several nieces and nephews.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Dr. Peter O. Kwiterovich Jr., an internationally known expert on lipid disorders who was the founder and director of the Johns Hopkins Lipid Clinic and was an early advocate for routine cholesterol screening in children, died Friday of prostate cancer at his Roland Park home. He was 74. "We have lost a true giant in the field of cardiovascular disease. He was one of the quiet pioneers at Hopkins," said Dr. George J. Dover, pediatrician-in-chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital and director of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
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NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2005
SCARLET POWER Red is one of those colors that almost always makes a statement. It says bold. It says saucy. It says romantic. For February, the American Heart Association wants you to think about something else when you see red -- heart disease. Cardiovascular disease is the leading killer of women. So, during February (American Heart Month), the AHA will launch the "Go Red for Women" campaign, a push to get more women to learn about heart disease and stroke, lower their risk for both and live stronger, longer lives.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 26, 2012
Early menopause may mean a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins Medicine . The researchers say the risk can be twice as high, and doctors should help women avoid early menopause if possible. “If physicians know a patient has entered menopause before her 46th birthday, they can be extra vigilant in making recommendations and providing treatments to help prevent heart attacks and stroke,” Dhananjay Vaidya, an assistant professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine in Hopkins'  School of Medicine and leader of the study, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Marlene Cimons and Marlene Cimons,Los Angeles Times | June 26, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The use of a standard hypertension drug to treat a certain type of high blood pressure afflicting mainly older Americans caused a dramatic reduction in the incidence of stroke, heart attacks and other types of cardiovascular disease among a study group, federal researchers reported yesterday.The study has major public health implications for the estimated 3 million to 4 million Americans older than 60 who suffer from isolated systolic hypertension.The study's results showed that low doses of a frequently prescribed diuretic, chlorthalidone, combined in some cases with a low dose of a beta-blocker, atenolol, decreased stroke by 36 percent, heart attacks by 27 percent and all cardiovascular disease by 32 percent.
NEWS
October 18, 1997
Dr. Carl Gottschalk,75, a medical school professor and a leading researcher on kidney disease, died Wednesday in Chapel Hill, N.C. He used micropuncture techniques to better understand kidney function and disease.Dr. Edgar Haber,65, a cardiovascular researcher and Harvard Medical School professor, died Monday of multiple myeloma in Boston. He directed the division of biological sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health, where he founded the Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.
NEWS
November 26, 1997
Joanna Cook Moore, 63, an actress who had roles in several Alfred Hitchcock television shows and was the mother of Oscar-winning actress Tatum O'Neal, died Saturday in Indian Wells, Calif.Robert Lewis, 88, an actor, director and acting coach whose star pupils included Marlon Brando, Meryl Streep and Faye Dunaway, died Sunday in New York.Nate Landsberg, 83, the Los Angeles Police Department's oldest active reserve officer, died of kidney cancer Monday in CulverCity, Calif.Onzy D. Matthews, 67, a noted jazz and big-band arranger who worked with Miles Davis, Duke Ellington and other musical greats, died in Dallas of cardiovascular disease.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2004
Rising levels of blood sugar can subject diabetics and nondiabetics alike to a greater risk of cardiovascular disease and death, according to two studies being released today. Reports in Annals of Internal Medicine suggested that doctors evaluate blood sugar alongside cholesterol and blood pressure in assessing a person's risk of heart disease. What's more, researchers said, the current epidemic of diabetes among both children and adults could foretell an epidemic of heart disease in years to come unless people take aggressive steps to control their blood sugar.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 16, 2003
Cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins can reduce the incidence of heart attacks and strokes among diabetics by a quarter to a third, even in patients who do not have high cholesterol levels, according to a major new British study. Giving the drugs to the 17 million Americans with diabetes could prevent as many as 170,000 heart attacks and strokes each year, researchers said. Worldwide, the drugs could prevent more than a million such events each year. Physicians should "now ask whether all type 2 diabetics should be given a statin, regardless of their cholesterol value," said Dr. Lars H. Lindholm of the Umea University Hospital in Sweden, who wrote a commentary accompanying the report in Friday's issue of The Lancet.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 9, 1994
The sharp decline in deaths from cardiovascular disease in the United States during the past two decades has been accompanied by an unexpected increase in the overall incidence of cancer and cancer deaths among people over 55, researchers say.White men born during the baby boom of 1948-57 have non-smoking-related cancer rates three times as high as their grandfathers, but the rate of cardiovascular disease has fallen by 43 percent, a government research team...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
A team of 30 volunteers from Johns Hopkins plans to partner with Baltimore City schools to offer city teens screening for early signs of heart disease. The free exams will look for key risk factors including obesity, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes and family history of disease. With the findings, officials hope to curb increasingly common bad eating and exercising habits before they become engrained. Hopkins officials already had been screening Maryland athletes for heart abnormalities and decided to expand the program to some 2,000 13-year-olds expected to attend a high school fair at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute Nov. 13 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. "One of the surprise findings from our other heart screenings was that basic risk factors for cardiovascular disease are too common among Maryland high-school students, and these students and their parents are simply unaware that they face a serious health problem," said Dr. Theodore Abraham, a cardiologist at the Johns Hopkins Hospital who is spearheading the screening efforts.
NEWS
April 16, 2009
Forums slated for school closures City schools officials will hold two public forums on the impact of proposed school closures, including William H. Lemmel Middle, where a boy was fatally stabbed last year. The forums will take place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday at Polytechnic Institute and from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday at Lake Clifton high school complex. Baltimore schools chief Andres Alonso has proposed a reorganization plan that calls for closing failing schools and expanding successful ones.
NEWS
By Deborah L. Shelton and Deborah L. Shelton,Chicago Tribune | September 17, 2008
CHICAGO - The debate over the safety of a chemical ubiquitous in the lives of Americans took center stage at a scientific hearing of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration yesterday as federal officials, scientists and health advocates gave vastly different assessments of the effects of exposure to bisphenol A. Bisphenol A, commonly known as BPA, is used extensively in epoxy resins lining food and beverage containers and in polycarbonate plastics used...
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | August 12, 2008
Baltimore has launched a citywide effort to educate the public on the dangers of high salt intake, which is associated with high blood pressure, particularly among African-Americans. In a city that is nearly 65 percent black, the risks of hypertension, which can lead to heart attack, kidney failure and stroke, are especially high. The city Health Department is bringing together researchers and public health advocates starting in September to try to untangle the reasons for high salt consumption and offer recommendations for how city officials and food suppliers can decrease it. The six-month-long effort was born out of a recent Health Department initiative to reduce health disparities caused by cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in Baltimore.
NEWS
February 27, 2008
Too quick to discard accepted treatments In their column "Medical uncertainty" (Opinion Commentary, Feb. 18), Erik Rifkin and Edward J. Bouwer seek to emphasize the "uncertainties" that persist in modern medicine. In doing so, they challenge some pieces of conventional medical wisdom, including those on the detrimental effects of chronically elevated blood cholesterol and blood glucose. As support for their argument, the authors cite two recent studies - one in which the cholesterol-lowering drug Zetia did not significantly affect plaque build-up in the carotid arteries and a second in which very aggressive blood sugar control was associated with increased mortality rates.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | February 4, 2008
To her neighbors, Grace Sommerhof seemed like a smart, capable and friendly woman who came for tea, bought gifts for neighborhood kids and stayed active in civic organizations. But she was also curiously private behind her front door. Neighbors checked on her by phone, but she would not answer the doorbell. She never let them inside her faded, two-story brick Colonial in the comfortable Wiltondale neighborhood of Towson. On Nov. 10, she became the first of 14 Maryland residents whose deaths this season have been attributed - in part at least - to cold weather.
NEWS
June 13, 2007
Seminar to talk about child diets The nonprofit Feingold Association will hold a free seminar for parents and teachers about dietary options for children with learning or behavior problems from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. June 21. This event will be held at the Marriott SpringHill Suites at 899 Elkridge Landing Road in Linthicum Heights. This seminar will introduce guests to the low-additive Feingold Program, a dietary plan for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, autism, dyslexia and other problems.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 21, 2004
Birth control pills reduce the incidence of heart attacks and other forms of cardiovascular disease and lower the incidence of certain types of cancer, including ovarian and endometrial cancer, researchers said yesterday. A team from Wayne State University in Detroit used the huge volume of data available for 162,000 women in the Women's Health Initiative - the same study that showed that hormone replacement therapy was much riskier than previously believed - to provide the most definitive word yet on the safety of "the pill."
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | December 27, 2007
The low-carb Atkins diet that raged last decade may not be the weight-loss juggernaut it once was, but it still has adherents and even a new book. And the controversial diet that promotes high-fat meats and cheeses over breads and pastas is still generating questions from the medical community. In a recently released study, a group of researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center says it might help people drop pounds but also might hurt the heart. The group compared three popular eating regimens -- Atkins, the low-carb and low-fat South Beach Diet and the vegetarian Ornish diet.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Reporter | August 2, 2007
About 20.8 million people in the United States have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. And as the general population ages and continues to gain weight and exercise less, more people are at risk for diabetes, says Dr. Thomas Donner, an endocrinologist and director of the University of Maryland's Joslin Diabetes Center. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease of elevated sugar levels in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1, which is seen more in children, is an auto-immune disease in which the immune system destroys the beta cells that make insulin for the body.
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