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Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

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NEWS
June 20, 1997
The 15-month-old grandson of County Commissioner Donald I. Dell nearly drowned Wednesday after falling into a swimming pool at the boy's Upperco home, authorities said yesterday.Jacob Armacost fell into a backyard pool in the 17000 block of Pleasant Meadows Road in northwest Baltimore County at 12: 12 p.m. after his mother had stepped away briefly, said Bill Toohey, a Baltimore County police spokesman."The child's mother returned, pulled him from the water, called 911 and administered CPR [cardiopulmonary resuscitation]
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NEWS
April 30, 2006
Coping with cancer is topic of series Carroll Hospital Center and the American Cancer Society will co-sponsor the "I Can Cope" series to help provide insight, encouragement and education to people with cancer and their families. This free series will meet from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. the first four Mondays of next month at the Women's Place at the hospital. Presenters and topics include: May 1: Dr. Yousuf Gaffar, oncologist and research director at the Carroll County Cancer Center, will provide a comprehensive introduction to cancer, its diagnosis, oncology terminology, treatment methods, including chemotherapy, and side effects.
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NEWS
By Staff writer | December 30, 1990
Three units of county fire and rescue workers were honored last week in a "Gift of Life" ceremony for their efforts in emergency lifesaving calls since September.The awards, given since 1986, usually are presented shortly after firefighters save a life.The most recent incident occurred Dec. 8, when Ronald J. Schrader, 49, of North Laurel experienced chest pains about 9:30 p.m.Schrader tried to ignore the pain, but finally called 911 about midnight. Shortly after rescue workers arrived, Schrader went into cardiac arrest.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | October 21, 2005
Here is one health training product that you'll want in your medicine cabinet. The American Heart Association has released a home training kit, with a manikin and training DVD, to teach your family the basics of cardiopulmonary resuscitation -- CPR. CPR Anytime comes with a blow-up mini-manikin named Anne that lets you practice critical chest compressions and rescue breathing at home. You follow a 22-minute DVD to learn, step-by-step, how to resuscitate adults and children. The kit costs $29.95 at cpranytime.
NEWS
December 29, 1991
RED CROSS HELPERS LAUDEDTen volunteers from the Red Cross Northeastern District were presented certificates of appreciation at the Annual Red Cross Holidays Party for Volunteers.Wendell Baxter was honored for his help in coordinating and teaching four mass trainings, as well as several other cardiopulmonary resuscitation and first aid courses. He also worked theRed Cross First Aid Station at a countywide fishing derby and assisted at the Perryville explosion.Mindi Bowers received a certificate for teaching at the mass trainings conducted throughout the year, working three days at the Red Cross First Aid and Baby Comfort Stations at the Harford County Farm Fair, and staffing the first aid and baby comfort stations at the Bel Air Arts Festival.
NEWS
April 30, 2006
Coping with cancer is topic of series Carroll Hospital Center and the American Cancer Society will co-sponsor the "I Can Cope" series to help provide insight, encouragement and education to people with cancer and their families. This free series will meet from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. the first four Mondays of next month at the Women's Place at the hospital. Presenters and topics include: May 1: Dr. Yousuf Gaffar, oncologist and research director at the Carroll County Cancer Center, will provide a comprehensive introduction to cancer, its diagnosis, oncology terminology, treatment methods, including chemotherapy, and side effects.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | October 21, 2005
Here is one health training product that you'll want in your medicine cabinet. The American Heart Association has released a home training kit, with a manikin and training DVD, to teach your family the basics of cardiopulmonary resuscitation -- CPR. CPR Anytime comes with a blow-up mini-manikin named Anne that lets you practice critical chest compressions and rescue breathing at home. You follow a 22-minute DVD to learn, step-by-step, how to resuscitate adults and children. The kit costs $29.95 at cpranytime.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 14, 1999
A Harford County man on a day trip with friends to Ocean City drowned yesterday after he fell from an inflatable raft several yards offshore, resort police said.Police said Roger L. Harrell Jr., 22, of Bel Air was 50 yards offshore at 47th Street about 2: 45 p.m. when a friend saw him fall off the raft into rough water that was being whipped by a breeze.The friend, 17, alerted the beach patrol, and at least one member of the safety force reached Harrell before he drifted too far from the beach, police said.
NEWS
July 1, 2001
Public service video to show mobile clinic Mission of Mercy, the mobile medical clinic that makes several stops in Carroll County, is featured in a new video produced by Towson University. The video will be shown to service organizations, churches and civic groups in Mission of Mercy's service area, said David Liddle, chief executive officer. "Anyone who wants to know more about the health problems faced by the increasing of the uninsured should contact us," Liddle said. "By the time patients get to Mission of Mercy, they are desperate.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | July 5, 1994
Q: Do you agree with my friends who have urged me to enroll in a CPR training program because my husband had a heart attack several months ago?A: Your friends' advice makes good sense since your husband's heart attack puts him at a greater risk for having a cardiac arrest caused by an abnormal heart rhythm.About 70 percent of cardiac arrests occur at home, and promptly administered CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) can maintain an adequate blood flow to the brain until professional help arrives.
NEWS
July 1, 2001
Public service video to show mobile clinic Mission of Mercy, the mobile medical clinic that makes several stops in Carroll County, is featured in a new video produced by Towson University. The video will be shown to service organizations, churches and civic groups in Mission of Mercy's service area, said David Liddle, chief executive officer. "Anyone who wants to know more about the health problems faced by the increasing of the uninsured should contact us," Liddle said. "By the time patients get to Mission of Mercy, they are desperate.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1999
A 41-year-old Delaware man died late Saturday night after he was shot in the left shoulder by a Maryland state trooper who was dragged down a Cecil County road hanging from the man's truck after a traffic stop, police said.Maurice K. Moore Jr. of the 2700 block of Frenchtown Road in Newark, Del., was pronounced dead at Union Hospital in Elkton, police said. An autopsy will be performed, a spokeswoman for the Maryland State Police said.Trooper Raymond Lynn, who has been on the force three years, was placed on paid administrative leave pending an investigation, Herman said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 14, 1999
A Harford County man on a day trip with friends to Ocean City drowned yesterday after he fell from an inflatable raft several yards offshore, resort police said.Police said Roger L. Harrell Jr., 22, of Bel Air was 50 yards offshore at 47th Street about 2: 45 p.m. when a friend saw him fall off the raft into rough water that was being whipped by a breeze.The friend, 17, alerted the beach patrol, and at least one member of the safety force reached Harrell before he drifted too far from the beach, police said.
NEWS
June 20, 1997
The 15-month-old grandson of County Commissioner Donald I. Dell nearly drowned Wednesday after falling into a swimming pool at the boy's Upperco home, authorities said yesterday.Jacob Armacost fell into a backyard pool in the 17000 block of Pleasant Meadows Road in northwest Baltimore County at 12: 12 p.m. after his mother had stepped away briefly, said Bill Toohey, a Baltimore County police spokesman."The child's mother returned, pulled him from the water, called 911 and administered CPR [cardiopulmonary resuscitation]
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | January 3, 1995
Our first column of the new year always feels like a new beginning. The Southview Regional Shopping Center also is having a new beginning. The center has a bright new green facade, new roofs with brick columns and a repaved parking lot. Young and old neighbors are thrilled with the fancy new look.The center's long renovation has been a rough time for many of us. However, neighbors throughout the community will agree the renovation has been a long time coming and is well worth putting up with the inconveniences.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | July 5, 1994
Q: Do you agree with my friends who have urged me to enroll in a CPR training program because my husband had a heart attack several months ago?A: Your friends' advice makes good sense since your husband's heart attack puts him at a greater risk for having a cardiac arrest caused by an abnormal heart rhythm.About 70 percent of cardiac arrests occur at home, and promptly administered CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) can maintain an adequate blood flow to the brain until professional help arrives.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1999
A 41-year-old Delaware man died late Saturday night after he was shot in the left shoulder by a Maryland state trooper who was dragged down a Cecil County road hanging from the man's truck after a traffic stop, police said.Maurice K. Moore Jr. of the 2700 block of Frenchtown Road in Newark, Del., was pronounced dead at Union Hospital in Elkton, police said. An autopsy will be performed, a spokeswoman for the Maryland State Police said.Trooper Raymond Lynn, who has been on the force three years, was placed on paid administrative leave pending an investigation, Herman said.
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | January 3, 1995
Our first column of the new year always feels like a new beginning. The Southview Regional Shopping Center also is having a new beginning. The center has a bright new green facade, new roofs with brick columns and a repaved parking lot. Young and old neighbors are thrilled with the fancy new look.The center's long renovation has been a rough time for many of us. However, neighbors throughout the community will agree the renovation has been a long time coming and is well worth putting up with the inconveniences.
NEWS
By Katherine Ramirez and Katherine Ramirez,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
An article in yesterday's editions reported incorrectly that the Downtown Partnership has launched a $1.7 advertising campaign to promote its "clean and safe" program. In fact, the ad campaign is being conducted at no cost to the organization because local media are donating time or space for the ads.The Sun regrets the errors.A $1.7 million advertising campaign was launched this month to sell downtown Baltimore as a safe place for tourists and residents.The public service spots on radio and television and in print that will run through the summer aim to change perceptions that Baltimore is a crime-ridden city.
NEWS
By STEVEN LEVENSON and DIANE HOFFMAN | May 16, 1993
Governor Schaefer signed Tuesday the Health Care Decisions Act, passed by the General Assembly in its just-concluded session. The new law will take effect on Oct. 1. Maryland's citizens should be aware of its content and implications.The legislation makes Maryland citizens better able to express their desires about their medical care. The law also breaks new ground in allowing citizens to make decisions about the care of family or close friends who can no longer make decisions for themselves and who did not previously express their wishes in writing.
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