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NEWS
By Janet Cromley and Janet Cromley,Los Angeles Times | November 24, 2006
The ballroom dance that scandalized polite English society in the 19th century for its salacious pairing of men and women is causing a ruckus again. The waltz, it turns out, can have actual health benefits. In a study of 110 heart failure patients presented last week at a meeting of the American Heart Association in Chicago, researchers reported that dancing the waltz three times a week for eight weeks was just as effective in improving cardiopulmonary function as exercising on a treadmill or bicycle for the same period.
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NEWS
By Karen Shih | June 3, 2008
A Pasadena toddler drowned after climbing out of his parents' bed and wandering outside into the family pool, authorities said yesterday. Dayden Alexander Dunn, 20 months, was found floating in the pool behind the house on the 8000 block of Forest Glen Drive shortly before 8 a.m. Sunday. His parents said they had last noticed him in bed about 6 a.m. They "don't know if he fell in, jumped in; that part we'll never know," said Lt. Jeffrey Silverman, an Anne Arundel County police spokesman.
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NEWS
July 16, 2006
Dr. Stephen B. Liggett Occupation Professor of medicine and physiology and director of the cardiopulmonary genomics program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. In the news Liggett was the lead author of a study that discovered why one of the most commonly prescribed heart medications doesn't always work. The findings on beta blockers could alter treatment for millions suffering from congestive heart failure. Career highlights He was an intern and resident in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo. He was an assistant professor of medicine at Duke University from 1990 to 1992, then held a number of positions at the University of Cincinnati, where he became director of its cardiopulmonary research center in 2003.
NEWS
By Janet Cromley and Janet Cromley,Los Angeles Times | November 24, 2006
The ballroom dance that scandalized polite English society in the 19th century for its salacious pairing of men and women is causing a ruckus again. The waltz, it turns out, can have actual health benefits. In a study of 110 heart failure patients presented last week at a meeting of the American Heart Association in Chicago, researchers reported that dancing the waltz three times a week for eight weeks was just as effective in improving cardiopulmonary function as exercising on a treadmill or bicycle for the same period.
NEWS
April 9, 1999
Officer Gregory L. Justice Jr. of Pasadena has been given the Maryland Transportation Authority's Life Saving Award and was named Officer of the Year for the Baltimore-Washington International Airport Detachment for last year.Justice, who graduated from the authority's police academy in May, was honored at a recent awards ceremony at authority headquarters near Key Bridge.He received the lifesaving award for treating a person who had collapsed on D pier at the airport with an apparent heart attack last September.
NEWS
November 13, 2001
A Parkville man remained hospitalized yesterday, a day after he was injured in a double motorcycle accident near Lineboro that killed a White Marsh man, authorities said. The accident occurred about 12:45 p.m. Sunday when the two motorcyclists - traveling on Alesia-Lineboro Road with a group of three others - left the pavement at the same time and struck a wooden fence, police said. The motorcyclists did not collide, and police said excessive speed was the cause of the accidents. Harold G. Metzger, 34, was in serious condition yesterday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, a hospital spokesman said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 28, 2005
A PERI Formwork Systems Inc. worker was killed Wednesday after a forklift ran over him at the concrete-forming company in Elkridge, according to the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health Agency. An employee was operating a forklift about 2:20 p.m. at 7141 Dorsey Run Road. Apparently he did not see Steven Francis Wall, 45, of the 200 block of Thomas Manor Lane in Forest Hill, and ran over him, said Linda Sherman, an agency spokeswoman. Employees used another forklift to lift the forklift off Wall, said Bill Mould, a spokesman for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services.
NEWS
March 18, 1992
City police today were awaiting an autopsy on the body of a 1-year-old baby who was found unconscious and not breathing in her East Baltimore home.Shanikqua Johnson, of the 800 block of McKim St., was pronounced dead on arrival at Johns Hopkins Hospital shortly after 2 a.m., Homicide Detective Michael Crutchfield said.City paramedics called to the house by the child's mother, Cheryl Smith, 22, found the infant in a bed.The medics performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation while they transported the infant to the hospital.
NEWS
March 3, 1998
A Westminster man saved his 2 1/2 -year-old son from a weekend drowning in a backyard pool, authorities said.Andrew E. Rowe, of the 1000 block of Sullivan Road, was found unconscious in about two feet of water at 3: 37 p.m. Sunday, state police said.Aided by a 911 dispatcher's instructions given over the phone to his wife, Donald Rowe performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation. When emergency personnel arrived, Andrew was conscious and crying, and they worked to raise his temperature from 87.1 degrees Fahrenheit, officials said.
NEWS
By Karen Shih | June 3, 2008
A Pasadena toddler drowned after climbing out of his parents' bed and wandering outside into the family pool, authorities said yesterday. Dayden Alexander Dunn, 20 months, was found floating in the pool behind the house on the 8000 block of Forest Glen Drive shortly before 8 a.m. Sunday. His parents said they had last noticed him in bed about 6 a.m. They "don't know if he fell in, jumped in; that part we'll never know," said Lt. Jeffrey Silverman, an Anne Arundel County police spokesman.
NEWS
July 16, 2006
Dr. Stephen B. Liggett Occupation Professor of medicine and physiology and director of the cardiopulmonary genomics program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. In the news Liggett was the lead author of a study that discovered why one of the most commonly prescribed heart medications doesn't always work. The findings on beta blockers could alter treatment for millions suffering from congestive heart failure. Career highlights He was an intern and resident in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo. He was an assistant professor of medicine at Duke University from 1990 to 1992, then held a number of positions at the University of Cincinnati, where he became director of its cardiopulmonary research center in 2003.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 28, 2005
A PERI Formwork Systems Inc. worker was killed Wednesday after a forklift ran over him at the concrete-forming company in Elkridge, according to the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health Agency. An employee was operating a forklift about 2:20 p.m. at 7141 Dorsey Run Road. Apparently he did not see Steven Francis Wall, 45, of the 200 block of Thomas Manor Lane in Forest Hill, and ran over him, said Linda Sherman, an agency spokeswoman. Employees used another forklift to lift the forklift off Wall, said Bill Mould, a spokesman for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2002
A Howard County toddler was critically injured and three people drowned in St. Mary's and Wicomico counties in swimming and boating accidents over the weekend, authorities said. At Point Lookout State Park in St. Mary's County, a 39-year-old man drowned while swimming in an unprotected area of the park shortly before 3 p.m. Saturday. The man, who was not immediately identified, was pulled from the water by friends, said Heather Lynch, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
November 13, 2001
A Parkville man remained hospitalized yesterday, a day after he was injured in a double motorcycle accident near Lineboro that killed a White Marsh man, authorities said. The accident occurred about 12:45 p.m. Sunday when the two motorcyclists - traveling on Alesia-Lineboro Road with a group of three others - left the pavement at the same time and struck a wooden fence, police said. The motorcyclists did not collide, and police said excessive speed was the cause of the accidents. Harold G. Metzger, 34, was in serious condition yesterday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, a hospital spokesman said.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2000
WHILE TRAVELING down Uniontown Road in Westminster in the morning, drivers are likely to see an older gentleman walking at a brisk pace along the sidewalk. Not a terribly unusual sight. But what those drivers don't realize is that this 70-year-old man, a survivor of prostate cancer, has just passed the 25,000-mile mark in his near-daily travels. "When I first started, I'd keep track of the miles and look at it as if I was going cross country," said Marvin Fuchs, who started jogging about 24 years ago when he became more conscious of his health.
TOPIC
By Henry Silverman | June 18, 2000
IN AN EFFORT to honor family requests to donate the organs of a family member who may die shortly after the elective withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments, Baltimore hospitals in conjunction with the Transplant Resource Center of Maryland are developing new protocols allowing the harvesting of organs from donors who have been declared dead by cardiopulmonary criteria. Because the hearts of these patients will not be beating at the time of organ procurement, these protocols are called Non-Heartbeating Donor (NHBD)
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2002
A Howard County toddler was critically injured and three people drowned in St. Mary's and Wicomico counties in swimming and boating accidents over the weekend, authorities said. At Point Lookout State Park in St. Mary's County, a 39-year-old man drowned while swimming in an unprotected area of the park shortly before 3 p.m. Saturday. The man, who was not immediately identified, was pulled from the water by friends, said Heather Lynch, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Natural Resources.
TOPIC
By Henry Silverman | June 18, 2000
IN AN EFFORT to honor family requests to donate the organs of a family member who may die shortly after the elective withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments, Baltimore hospitals in conjunction with the Transplant Resource Center of Maryland are developing new protocols allowing the harvesting of organs from donors who have been declared dead by cardiopulmonary criteria. Because the hearts of these patients will not be beating at the time of organ procurement, these protocols are called Non-Heartbeating Donor (NHBD)
NEWS
April 9, 1999
Officer Gregory L. Justice Jr. of Pasadena has been given the Maryland Transportation Authority's Life Saving Award and was named Officer of the Year for the Baltimore-Washington International Airport Detachment for last year.Justice, who graduated from the authority's police academy in May, was honored at a recent awards ceremony at authority headquarters near Key Bridge.He received the lifesaving award for treating a person who had collapsed on D pier at the airport with an apparent heart attack last September.
NEWS
March 3, 1998
A Westminster man saved his 2 1/2 -year-old son from a weekend drowning in a backyard pool, authorities said.Andrew E. Rowe, of the 1000 block of Sullivan Road, was found unconscious in about two feet of water at 3: 37 p.m. Sunday, state police said.Aided by a 911 dispatcher's instructions given over the phone to his wife, Donald Rowe performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation. When emergency personnel arrived, Andrew was conscious and crying, and they worked to raise his temperature from 87.1 degrees Fahrenheit, officials said.
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