Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCardiomyopathy
IN THE NEWS

Cardiomyopathy

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | October 11, 1994
Q: Two acquaintances of mine have had a heart transplant while in their 30s. What kind of heart problem can require a transplant at that early age?A: Although it is a relatively uncommon form of heart disease, cardiomyopathy is the most common disorder resulting in a heart transplant in young people. Cardiomyopathy is a term used to describe several types of abnormalities of the muscle (myocardium) of the left ventricle, the heart chamber that pumps blood via the aorta to the rest of the body.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | June 5, 2008
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), is considered the No. 1 cause of sudden death in young athletes. But this inherited condition, which causes the thickening of the heart muscle, frequently has no symptoms, says Dr. Theodore Abraham, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and director of Johns Hopkins' Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic. What is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? It is an inherited condition most commonly associated with the thickening of the ventricular muscle or the heart wall muscle and ends up being the most common cause of sudden death in those below 30 years of age. It effects all ages and genders and does not appear to have an ethnic preference.
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 26, 1990
A preliminary autopsy showed that Northeast Missouri State's Derringer Cade, who collapsed and died during a game Saturday suffered from a rare heart disease. Cade had idiopathic hypertropic cardiomyopathy, a condition characterized by thickened walls of the heart, said Capt. Mike Milner, a Fort Leonard Wood spokesman. The autopsy was conducted at the Army base, where Cade's father, Sgt. Maj. Smith Cade, is stationed.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2002
Steve Ferralli returned to Southern Middle School in Lothian yesterday with a new heart but the same soul - full of the energy, warmth and humor that have marked his 26-year teaching career. "Mr. Ferralli's back!" some pupils shouted as they entered his classroom. They had not seen him since September, when he abruptly left school one morning to rush to Washington Hospital Center for a heart transplant. After two weeks in the hospital and four months at home, the technical education teacher returned to the classroom yesterday.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer The Boston Globe contributed to this article | July 28, 1993
Reggie Lewis' fatal collapse on a practice court was sure to rekindle a bizarre medical debate that arose last spring after he received conflicting advice after passing out during an NBA playoff game in April.Initially, a team of cardiologists at the New England Baptist Hospital concluded that he suffered from a life-threatening heart abnormality -- focal cardiomyopathy -- that ruled out any further exertion. His career appeared over.Apparently unhappy with the advice, Lewis sought a second opinion at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, where Dr. Gilbert Mudge performed further tests and concluded that Lewis had "a normal athlete's heart."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | July 29, 1993
In the most tragic way imaginable, the death of pro basketball star Reggie Lewis underscores the agonizing choices that confront patients who get differing medical opinions about the conditions that ail them.Mr. Lewis may have been a man looking for the second opinion he wanted to hear -- that he didn't have a serious heart disorder and could safely return to the court. When he heard it, he accepted it and suffered the consequences.Also, as many doctors have suggested, it may be true that there should never have been a dispute about the athlete's condition.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2002
Steve Ferralli returned to Southern Middle School in Lothian yesterday with a new heart but the same soul - full of the energy, warmth and humor that have marked his 26-year teaching career. "Mr. Ferralli's back!" some pupils shouted as they entered his classroom. They had not seen him since September, when he abruptly left school one morning to rush to Washington Hospital Center for a heart transplant. After two weeks in the hospital and four months at home, the technical education teacher returned to the classroom yesterday.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 10, 1995
Reggie Lewis died on a basketball court in Boston largely because the opinions of some of the country's best heart doctors were ignored.The lesson was as obvious as it was tragic: A consensus of top medical experts shouldn't be refuted.Twenty months later, as Lewis' death hits the front page again thanks to a Wall Street Journal story suggesting possible cocaine use, we face the same dilemma Lewis faced as we try to discern the truth in this sad mess: Should we believe the doctors?The problem is it's not nearly so simple this time.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | June 5, 2008
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), is considered the No. 1 cause of sudden death in young athletes. But this inherited condition, which causes the thickening of the heart muscle, frequently has no symptoms, says Dr. Theodore Abraham, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and director of Johns Hopkins' Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic. What is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? It is an inherited condition most commonly associated with the thickening of the ventricular muscle or the heart wall muscle and ends up being the most common cause of sudden death in those below 30 years of age. It effects all ages and genders and does not appear to have an ethnic preference.
SPORTS
September 28, 1997
BaseballGiants: Purchased contract of P William VanLandingham from Triple-A Phoenix. Designated 1B-OF Desi Wilson for assignment.FootballBengals: Waived WR Gunnard Taylor. Signed LB Tim Terry from practice squad.Saints: Waived WR Mercury Hayes. Signed WR Brett Bech.HockeyNHL: Suspended Kings F Matt Johnson, pending hearing, for slashing Sharks RW Todd Ewen Wednesday.Islanders: Agreed to terms with C Travis Green.SwimmingU.S. Swimming: Named Chad Carvin, who overcame cardiomyopathy to win six U.S. titles and five international medals in 1997, Swimmer of the Year.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 10, 1995
Reggie Lewis died on a basketball court in Boston largely because the opinions of some of the country's best heart doctors were ignored.The lesson was as obvious as it was tragic: A consensus of top medical experts shouldn't be refuted.Twenty months later, as Lewis' death hits the front page again thanks to a Wall Street Journal story suggesting possible cocaine use, we face the same dilemma Lewis faced as we try to discern the truth in this sad mess: Should we believe the doctors?The problem is it's not nearly so simple this time.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | October 11, 1994
Q: Two acquaintances of mine have had a heart transplant while in their 30s. What kind of heart problem can require a transplant at that early age?A: Although it is a relatively uncommon form of heart disease, cardiomyopathy is the most common disorder resulting in a heart transplant in young people. Cardiomyopathy is a term used to describe several types of abnormalities of the muscle (myocardium) of the left ventricle, the heart chamber that pumps blood via the aorta to the rest of the body.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | July 29, 1993
In the most tragic way imaginable, the death of pro basketball star Reggie Lewis underscores the agonizing choices that confront patients who get differing medical opinions about the conditions that ail them.Mr. Lewis may have been a man looking for the second opinion he wanted to hear -- that he didn't have a serious heart disorder and could safely return to the court. When he heard it, he accepted it and suffered the consequences.Also, as many doctors have suggested, it may be true that there should never have been a dispute about the athlete's condition.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer The Boston Globe contributed to this article | July 28, 1993
Reggie Lewis' fatal collapse on a practice court was sure to rekindle a bizarre medical debate that arose last spring after he received conflicting advice after passing out during an NBA playoff game in April.Initially, a team of cardiologists at the New England Baptist Hospital concluded that he suffered from a life-threatening heart abnormality -- focal cardiomyopathy -- that ruled out any further exertion. His career appeared over.Apparently unhappy with the advice, Lewis sought a second opinion at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, where Dr. Gilbert Mudge performed further tests and concluded that Lewis had "a normal athlete's heart."
SPORTS
September 26, 1990
A preliminary autopsy showed that Northeast Missouri State's Derringer Cade, who collapsed and died during a game Saturday suffered from a rare heart disease. Cade had idiopathic hypertropic cardiomyopathy, a condition characterized by thickened walls of the heart, said Capt. Mike Milner, a Fort Leonard Wood spokesman. The autopsy was conducted at the Army base, where Cade's father, Sgt. Maj. Smith Cade, is stationed.
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH | May 23, 2007
Former Maryland men's basketball forward LaRon Cephas died last month of an enlarged heart, or dilated cardiomyopathy, the Baltimore Medical Examiner's office confirmed yesterday. Cephas died unexpectedly at his Cape St. Claire home the morning of April 16 while he was getting ready for work. He was 29. The cause of death was ruled "natural," meaning there was nothing suspicious about it. Cephas, a native of Wilmington, Del., was a reserve forward who averaged 1.7 points and 1.1 rebounds as a senior in 2000-01.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | May 4, 1993
Reggie Lewis, the Dunbar High School sixth man who became an NBA All-Star with the Boston Celtics, has a cardiomyopathy, a potentially "life-threatening" heart ailment that likely will end his career, according to Celtics' team doctor Arnold Scheller."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.