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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
When Good Charlotte released its first album more than a decade ago, few critics saw much of a future for the band. Upbeat, impetuous, sure; but it was mostly seen as a slightly more punk alternative to the boy bands of the moment. And yet the band is now touring to promote its fifth album, "Cardiology," which came out last year. Guitarist Benji Madden, who started the band in Waldorf in Southern Maryland with his brother, Joel, isn't surprised. "We never planned on breaking up. I can't see us doing much else," said Madden.
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HEALTH
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Irene Pollin, the wife of former Washington Capitals and Wizards owner Abe Pollin, has given $10 million to Johns Hopkins' Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease. Her donation establishes the Kenneth Jay Pollin Professorship in Cardiology and will enable the school to embark on new research projects, the university announced Thursday. Pollin lost two children to congenital heart defects. Kenneth, for whom the professorship is named, died when he was 13 months old. Pollin's daughter, Linda, died at age 16. Her husband died in 2009.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
Dr. Nathan Carliner, a cardiologist and University of Maryland School of Medicine professor who practiced at the downtown Veterans Affairs Medical Center, died of bone cancer Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Cross Keys resident was 66. Born in Baltimore and raised on South Road in Mount Washington, known as "Pill Hill" for the many medical professionals who lived there, he was the son of Dr. Paul Carliner, who in 1947 co-discovered Dramamine. "My father died of a heart attack at age 46 in 1956.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
When Good Charlotte released its first album more than a decade ago, few critics saw much of a future for the band. Upbeat, impetuous, sure; but it was mostly seen as a slightly more punk alternative to the boy bands of the moment. And yet the band is now touring to promote its fifth album, "Cardiology," which came out last year. Guitarist Benji Madden, who started the band in Waldorf in Southern Maryland with his brother, Joel, isn't surprised. "We never planned on breaking up. I can't see us doing much else," said Madden.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2006
Dr. Leonard Scherlis, a retired University of Maryland cardiology professor who was an early champion of CPR as an emergency heart resuscitation technique that could be performed by anyone, died of cancer Saturday at his Guilford home. He was 84. More than 40 years ago, he became convinced that lives could be saved if a new procedure, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, could be administered immediately after a heart attack. He founded the American Heart Association's CPR Committee in 1963, the same year the national medical organization formally endorsed the procedure.
NEWS
July 21, 2003
On July 18, 2003, DR. STANLEY LORMAN BLUMENTHAL; beloved husband of Anita Blumenthal; loving father of Dr. Roger Blumenthal; dear father-in-law of Dr. Wendy Post Blumenthal; adored brother of Dr. Leonard Blumenthal, of Palm Beach, FL; loving grandfather of Ross Blumenthal. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road, at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Monday, July 21, at 2 P.M. In lieu of flowers, contributions in his memory may be directed to John Hopkins Ciccarone Prevention Cardiology Center, Carniegie 538-Cardiology, 600 N. Wolfe Street, (21287)
NEWS
September 2, 2003
On August 30, 2003, MICHELLE Y. KHOURY; devoted daughter of Osama and Gloria Khoury; dear sister of John and Nicole Khoury; loving aunt of Julian and loving friend to all. Service and interment private. Contributions may be made in her memory to John Hopkins School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, 601 N. Caroline St. Baltimore MD 21287-0960.
NEWS
May 14, 2004
Suddenly on May 11, 2004, JOSEPH KYLE, beloved son of E. Lee Nix and Rhonda Richards; loving brother of Shannon, Christal, Coty, Dustin, and Melinda; cherished grandson of Marge and Ron Carroll and Ramona Carroll; dear uncle of Sierra, Michael, and Tony; stepson of Linda and Leo; and devoted fiance of Mary-Ann Mc Conkey. Also survived by many loving family and friends. Friends may call at the Cornerstone Church, 7526 Connelley Drive, Hanover, MD (21076), on Friday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service on Saturday at 10 a.m. Interment in Glen Haven Memorial Park.
FEATURES
June 26, 2008
* Peggy Collier is the new director of work-force planning at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center. At GBMC, Collier develops a strategy and direction for staffing, assists with employee retention and develops work-force projections. *Nurse Angela Keppley is St. Agnes Hospital's 2008 Nurse of the Year. She is a nurse at 5 North, a medical/surgical unit. She was chosen because of her nursing skills, her ability to meet patients' needs, and her compassion and dedication to St. Agnes Hospital's mission and vision.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
Dr. Dionisio Legaspi "Don" Garcia Jr., a physician who specialized in cardiology and internal medicine, died of cancer Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Hunt Valley resident was 67. Dr. Garcia was born and raised in the Philippines, where he received his medical degree from the Aznar College of Medicine at Southwestern University in 1961. In 1963, he moved to Baltimore for an internship at Maryland General Hospital. He had residencies in internal medicine at the Sisters of Charity Hospital in Buffalo, N.Y., and Harrisburg Hospital in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Sandeep Rao | February 24, 2011
Europeans have long extolled centralized planning and tolerated large government bureaucracies. But when it comes to approving medical devices, Europe has taken a decidedly decentralized approach — to the great benefit of patients and health care workers. It is an example the United States would do well to follow. Consider the field of cardiology. A national medical conference, such as the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, gives you a glimpse into the future.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,robert.little@baltsun.com | July 24, 2009
St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson has reached an "agreement in principle" with the federal government to settle any claims that might arise in a long-running investigation of the hospital's relationship with its dominant cardiology practice, hospital officials said yesterday. Details of the agreement, which is expected to include a monetary penalty, were not disclosed. But interim CEO Robert Lovell began telling employees about the deal Thursday and released a statement later in the day saying that the agreement has been forwarded by U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein to the Justice Department and other federal agencies for final approval, which could take several months.
NEWS
April 13, 2009
* MidAtlantic Cardiovascular Associates is expanding its women's cardiovascular program with additional locations in Catonsville and Rosedale. Dr. Shannon Winakur will oversee cardiovascular care at the Catonsville location, 3449 Wilkens Ave., and Dr. Dawn Kershner will oversee cardiovascular care at the Rosedale location, 9105 Franklin Square Drive. Winakur received her medical degree from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and completed her fellowship in cardiology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Robert Little and Stephanie Desmon and Robert Little,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com and robert.little@baltsun.com | March 24, 2009
The federal agency responsible for investigating Medicare fraud and other health law violations, and whose probe of St. Joseph Medical Center led to a leadership shake-up last month, has ordered a group of cardiology specialists affiliated with the hospital to hand over business records. Midatlantic Cardiovascular Associates, a dominant cardiology practice at hospitals in the Baltimore area, received a subpoena from the Department of Health and Human Services in June - the month the agency made a similar demand of St. Joseph, according to documents shared with The Baltimore Sun and sources connected to the hospital.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
Dr. Nathan Carliner, a cardiologist and University of Maryland School of Medicine professor who practiced at the downtown Veterans Affairs Medical Center, died of bone cancer Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Cross Keys resident was 66. Born in Baltimore and raised on South Road in Mount Washington, known as "Pill Hill" for the many medical professionals who lived there, he was the son of Dr. Paul Carliner, who in 1947 co-discovered Dramamine. "My father died of a heart attack at age 46 in 1956.
NEWS
April 12, 2006
Dr. Ralph Weber, a cardiologist who practiced at area hospitals for more than 50 years, died of cancer Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Pikesville resident was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised on Park Avenue in Reservoir Hill, he attended the Robert E. Lee Junior High School No. 49 and was a 1945 City College graduate. He earned a bachelor's degree in biology and chemistry from Franklin & Marshall College and completed his medical education at the Temple University School of Medicine.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | February 10, 2006
Heart Care For Life: Developing the Program that Works Best for You By Barry L. Zaret, M.D., and Genell J. Subak-Sharpe Yale University Press/2006/$26 If you do an Internet search for books on heart health, you'll be deluged with more than 4,000 titles, ranging from self-help to recipes. It's mind-boggling. But here's one to consider. Yale University Press has released Heart Care for Life as part of its consumer health and wellness book series. It's co-written by Dr. Barry L. Zaret, who served as chief of cardiology at Yale from 1978 to 2004 and founded the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
Dr. Catherine A. Neill, a pioneering and world-renowned pediatric cardiologist and faculty member at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, died Thursday of cancer at a hospice in Wimbledon, England. The Charles Village resident was 84. A pioneer in various areas of pediatric cardiology, she was the first to recognize and name in 1960 the "scimitar syndrome," which a Hopkins news release described as "a cardio-pulmonary defect in which the pulmonary veins from an abnormally developed right lung drain into the inferior vena cava; on X-ray, the defects resembles a curved sword, or scimitar."
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