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By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The National Conference of Catholic Bishops gave Chicago Cardinal Joseph Bernardin, accused in a lawsuit of sexually abusing a teen-age seminarian in the 1970s, a ringing vote of confidence in his innocence yesterday.A standing ovation for the popular cardinal, long an influential leader of the Roman Catholic Church hierarchy, was set off by the conference president, Baltimore Archbishop William H. Keeler, who departed from his opening remarks at the U.S. bishops' annual meeting to offer the Chicago prelate "our full support" and assurance that he will be vindicated.
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NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | November 27, 1996
BROADWAY, Va. -- When Cardinal Joseph Bernardin died recently in Chicago, the obits for him on the television news shows were simply stunning.First we heard a prominent African-American Protestant leader telling us about what a healer Bernardin was, how palpable was his love. Then a leading Chicago rabbi spoke of the simplicity of the man, and yet also of his extraordinary gifts in bringing people together to find the godly way through a problem.And so it went. This person -- ''your brother, Joseph'' as he called himself -- was apparently something quite special and rare.
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NEWS
November 15, 1996
WHEN WORD reached the Washington gathering of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops that Cardinal Joseph Bernardin's physical condition was rapidly deteriorating, his fellow bishops immediately bowed in prayer for him.That was perhaps to be expected, since Cardinal Bernardin, who died early yesterday at age 68, was not only the Roman Catholic Church's longest serving American prelate, but a man so renowned for his compassion, tolerance and skill at...
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 21, 1996
CHICAGO -- In a ceremony that blended the pageantry of a state funeral with the ancient Roman Catholic mysteries of the Mass, Cardinal Joseph Louis Bernardin, archbishop of Chicago and one of the most revered and influential religious leaders of his time, was laid to rest yesterday.Light filtered through the stained-glass windows of Holy Name Cathedral, and the cardinal's biretta sat on his empty altar chair. And many of the leaders of the U.S. Roman Catholic Church, as well as Vice President Al Gore, other members of the Clinton administration and hundreds of dignitaries, gathered to bid the cardinal farewell.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 21, 1996
CHICAGO -- In a ceremony that blended the pageantry of a state funeral with the ancient Roman Catholic mysteries of the Mass, Cardinal Joseph Louis Bernardin, archbishop of Chicago and one of the most revered and influential religious leaders of his time, was laid to rest yesterday.Light filtered through the stained-glass windows of Holy Name Cathedral, and the cardinal's biretta sat on his empty altar chair. And many of the leaders of the U.S. Roman Catholic Church, as well as Vice President Al Gore, other members of the Clinton administration and hundreds of dignitaries, gathered to bid the cardinal farewell.
NEWS
By FRANK P.L. SOMERVILLE | March 6, 1994
It should have come as no surprise that Roman Catholic Church leaders vented some righteous indignation and criticism of the press last week in the wake of Monday's end to sexual abuse charges against Chicago Cardinal Joseph Bernardin.Archbishop William H. Keeler of Baltimore, president of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, had presaged the reaction in November, when a man dying of AIDS made his shocking accusations in a $10 million lawsuit.Setting off a standing ovation for Cardinal Bernardin at the November meeting of the Catholic hierarchy in Washington, Archbishop Keeler had assured the popular and influential Chicago prelate of the church's "full support" and expressed the certainty that he would be vindicated.
NEWS
By LAURA OFOBIKE | January 19, 1995
Akron, Ohio. -- I can tell you why I haven't forgotten a former secretary of labor in the Reagan administration. His name is Raymond J. Donovan, not one of the hot-shots one usually remembers long after they are gone. But remember him I do, for one question to which he got no answer.Mr. Donovan resigned in 1984 when he was indicted on fraud charges. Three years later, he and several co-defendants were cleared of all charges. The day the jury verdict came down, Mr. Donovan asked of his accusers: ''Which office do I go to to get my reputation back?
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
Sexual abuse by Roman Catholic priests was not given a prominent place on the agenda for the meeting of bishops beginning tomorrow in Washington, but an abuse allegation against one of the church's most influential leaders is sure to cast a shadow over the proceedings.The church did not expect its annual conference to be dominated by the sex-abuse issue this year the way it was last November when abuse victims demonstrated in front of the meeting site.A lawsuit last week naming Chicago Cardinal Joseph Bernardin may change the bishops' priorities.
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | November 27, 1996
BROADWAY, Va. -- When Cardinal Joseph Bernardin died recently in Chicago, the obits for him on the television news shows were simply stunning.First we heard a prominent African-American Protestant leader telling us about what a healer Bernardin was, how palpable was his love. Then a leading Chicago rabbi spoke of the simplicity of the man, and yet also of his extraordinary gifts in bringing people together to find the godly way through a problem.And so it went. This person -- ''your brother, Joseph'' as he called himself -- was apparently something quite special and rare.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | November 17, 1996
IN THE WEEKS before he died, Chicago's Cardinal Joseph Bernardin spent some of his waning hours and energy reading a 1994 meditation on death by the Rev. Henri J. M. Nouwen, a Dutch Roman Catholic priest and prolific writer on the spiritual life."
NEWS
By Sara Engram | November 17, 1996
IN THE WEEKS before he died, Chicago's Cardinal Joseph Bernardin spent some of his waning hours and energy reading a 1994 meditation on death by the Rev. Henri J. M. Nouwen, a Dutch Roman Catholic priest and prolific writer on the spiritual life."
NEWS
November 15, 1996
WHEN WORD reached the Washington gathering of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops that Cardinal Joseph Bernardin's physical condition was rapidly deteriorating, his fellow bishops immediately bowed in prayer for him.That was perhaps to be expected, since Cardinal Bernardin, who died early yesterday at age 68, was not only the Roman Catholic Church's longest serving American prelate, but a man so renowned for his compassion, tolerance and skill at...
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 10, 1996
CHICAGO -- You shouldn't wait until after your friends die to give them flowers, my parents used to say. Maybe that's what President Clinton had in mind when he named Cardinal Joseph Bernardin, archbishop of Chicago, to receive the nation's highest civilian medal, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, in a White House ceremony yesterday.You don't have to be Roman Catholic to like Joe Bernardin, nor to learn from him. For years he has been teaching Chicagoans how to live. Now he has much to teach all Americans about how to die. Cardinal Bernardin, 68, has inoperable liver cancer.
NEWS
By LAURA OFOBIKE | January 19, 1995
Akron, Ohio. -- I can tell you why I haven't forgotten a former secretary of labor in the Reagan administration. His name is Raymond J. Donovan, not one of the hot-shots one usually remembers long after they are gone. But remember him I do, for one question to which he got no answer.Mr. Donovan resigned in 1984 when he was indicted on fraud charges. Three years later, he and several co-defendants were cleared of all charges. The day the jury verdict came down, Mr. Donovan asked of his accusers: ''Which office do I go to to get my reputation back?
NEWS
By Andrew M. Greeley | June 23, 1994
Rome -- IT'S NO secret in this city that the pope is ill.How ill he is and what is the nature of his illness is debated everywhere. One rumor is as good as another, and there's no point in paying any attention to most of them.Clearly, however, the church is in a "fin du regime" situation, but no one is sure how long that could last.It's a grisly business, this speculation on the pope's health, made no less grisly by the fact that no one ever believes the Vatican is telling the truth about any pope's health.
NEWS
By FRANK P.L. SOMERVILLE | March 6, 1994
It should have come as no surprise that Roman Catholic Church leaders vented some righteous indignation and criticism of the press last week in the wake of Monday's end to sexual abuse charges against Chicago Cardinal Joseph Bernardin.Archbishop William H. Keeler of Baltimore, president of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, had presaged the reaction in November, when a man dying of AIDS made his shocking accusations in a $10 million lawsuit.Setting off a standing ovation for Cardinal Bernardin at the November meeting of the Catholic hierarchy in Washington, Archbishop Keeler had assured the popular and influential Chicago prelate of the church's "full support" and expressed the certainty that he would be vindicated.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | November 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The nation's Roman Catholic bishops, embroiled in a heated discussion of the ordination of women and other issues raised by a proposed pastoral letter, are expected to vote today on a recommendation by Cardinal Joseph Bernardin of Chicago to refer the document to a committee.Being debated is a controversial fourth draft of the 100-page pastoral letter on women in the church and society, the result of a nine-year process of research, writing and revision.Criticisms of the letter were not resolved before the nearly 300 bishops went into executive session yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 10, 1996
CHICAGO -- You shouldn't wait until after your friends die to give them flowers, my parents used to say. Maybe that's what President Clinton had in mind when he named Cardinal Joseph Bernardin, archbishop of Chicago, to receive the nation's highest civilian medal, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, in a White House ceremony yesterday.You don't have to be Roman Catholic to like Joe Bernardin, nor to learn from him. For years he has been teaching Chicagoans how to live. Now he has much to teach all Americans about how to die. Cardinal Bernardin, 68, has inoperable liver cancer.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | November 21, 1993
Little wonder that many Roman Catholics long for a simpler, more innocent, more serene time when shocking sexual-abuse accusations involving respected religious figures, such as those lodged recently against Chicago Cardinal Joseph Bernardin, could be dismissed as preposterous without so much as a second thought. If such longing is a head-in-the-sand reaction to current events, it nonetheless is understandable.Unfortunately, as investigative reporters Elinor Burkett and Frank Bruni make painfully and abundantly clear in their readable, well-researched book, too many years of official church mishandling of unspeakable clergy misconduct have taken their toll.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The National Conference of Catholic Bishops gave Chicago Cardinal Joseph Bernardin, accused in a lawsuit of sexually abusing a teen-age seminarian in the 1970s, a ringing vote of confidence in his innocence yesterday.A standing ovation for the popular cardinal, long an influential leader of the Roman Catholic Church hierarchy, was set off by the conference president, Baltimore Archbishop William H. Keeler, who departed from his opening remarks at the U.S. bishops' annual meeting to offer the Chicago prelate "our full support" and assurance that he will be vindicated.
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