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By Ann Feild and Ann Feild,Contributing Writer | March 18, 1992
On a chilly, winter day, when the house is filled with the opulent odor of baking cardamom bread, it's easy to understand why fierce wars were once waged over spices.Cardamom lends a rich flavor to savory and dessert dishes alike -- it has charisma, if you like. It's an integral part of many Indian curries, and is very popular in Arab countries where it's used in coffee. But here in America, it's not on every cook's spice shelf.Why? Well, perhaps the cost is prohibitive. The first time I encountered cardamom at a food co-op, I thought there had been a pricing error.
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NEWS
October 18, 2006
It's time for our annual holiday cookie contest. This year, we're asking for recipes in two delicious categories: sugar and spice. In the sugar category, we're looking not so much for cutout sugar cookies as we are for sweet creations that have something unique about them. In the spice category, we'd love some distinctive takes on seasonal spices like cardamom, allspice, cloves and, of course, ginger. Send your favorite recipes to Kate Shatzkin, Food Editor, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, fax them to 410-783-2519 or e-mail them to food@baltsun.
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NEWS
By Donna Deane and Donna Deane,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 31, 2003
If certain flavors sing of the holidays -- nutmeg and cinnamon, ginger and cloves, a dash or two of good bourbon -- cardamom is certainly not on the list. But, dear baker, this is a mistake. Take a chance, just once, with a batch of butter cookies or maybe a dish of ice cream. Cardamom adds a powerfully sweet, somehow magical note to the simplest pastry or dessert. It's deeply, transportingly aromatic; somehow, cardamom seems celebratory. In Scandinavia and Germany, cardamom traditionally is used in cakes and breads and cookies.
NEWS
By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON and STEPHEN G. HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2006
DELHI, India-- --Cardamom. Indigenous to India, this astringent spice has a name that sounds like a mental reminder of something you really must do before Mother's Day. "Note to self: Send flowers or, at the very least, a cardamom." This somewhat-punishing pun occurred to me one afternoon a few weeks ago as I jostled along on the back of a bicycle rickshaw and my hardworking driver pedaled me deep into the ever-narrowing streets of Old Delhi, India. A chaotic warren of atmospheric alleys, this was once the walled city of Shahjahanabad, a Mughal capital founded in the mid-17th century.
NEWS
By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON and STEPHEN G. HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2006
DELHI, India-- --Cardamom. Indigenous to India, this astringent spice has a name that sounds like a mental reminder of something you really must do before Mother's Day. "Note to self: Send flowers or, at the very least, a cardamom." This somewhat-punishing pun occurred to me one afternoon a few weeks ago as I jostled along on the back of a bicycle rickshaw and my hardworking driver pedaled me deep into the ever-narrowing streets of Old Delhi, India. A chaotic warren of atmospheric alleys, this was once the walled city of Shahjahanabad, a Mughal capital founded in the mid-17th century.
NEWS
October 18, 2006
It's time for our annual holiday cookie contest. This year, we're asking for recipes in two delicious categories: sugar and spice. In the sugar category, we're looking not so much for cutout sugar cookies as we are for sweet creations that have something unique about them. In the spice category, we'd love some distinctive takes on seasonal spices like cardamom, allspice, cloves and, of course, ginger. Send your favorite recipes to Kate Shatzkin, Food Editor, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, fax them to 410-783-2519 or e-mail them to food@baltsun.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | May 9, 2004
Spring, when days become longer and landscapes return to a verdant hue, is a season of celebration. Countless couples select this time of the year to tie the knot, so that many of us have at least one bridal shower or wedding marked on our calendars in the next few weeks. Then there are graduations. High schools and colleges cap the end of their academic year with commencements, and proud parents and friends plan festivities to mark the graduates' achievements. Add reunions -- family, high school or college -- and it's easy to see why spring rivals only the Christmas holidays for entertaining.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
McCormick & Co. Inc. told shareholders yesterday that it is experimenting with discounts as deep as 25 to 35 percent on popular products, as part of the spice company's effort to meet competition from cheaper competitors.The test includes eight to 10 products in 11 regional markets across the nation, spokesman Mac Barrett said. It is not in effect in Baltimore-area stores, and McCormick would not say which spices the Sparks-based company is discounting.Chief Executive Charles P. McCormick Jr. said consumer price concerns are "the No. 1 problem we face" as he responded to a question about prices at McCormick's annual shareholders meeting yesterday, held at the Marriott Hunt Valley Inn."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | May 17, 1998
The names are as romantically enticing as the places they come from - tamarind and tellicherry pepper from India, saffron from Spain - but today's new spices and flavorings are as close as the corner restaurant, as familiar as your grocery shelves.People are traveling more, immigrants are arriving from places such as the Far East and Eastern Europe, and global communications have improved - meaning ordinary Americans are being exposed to - and subsequently craving - new flavors."The American palate seems to be demanding big, bold, in-your-face flavors," said Marianne Gillette, director of marketing for McCormick Flavors of Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp and David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 1997
Ariana isn't much to look at -- a small restaurant, tucked into a little shopping strip in quarters formerly home to a video game store. But a restaurant doesn't have to look glamorous to succeed, so long as the food is right.At Ariana, the food is just that, with spices and dishes from Afghanistan, India, Greece and the Middle East. They're homemade and served by owner Fahima Vorgetts, working alongside her family to the tune of ethnic music (Persian and Pakistani on our last visit).The decor is simple, with rugs and Middle Eastern dresses on the walls, and red diamond-patterned fabric muting what would have been harsh fluorescent lights overhead.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | May 9, 2004
Spring, when days become longer and landscapes return to a verdant hue, is a season of celebration. Countless couples select this time of the year to tie the knot, so that many of us have at least one bridal shower or wedding marked on our calendars in the next few weeks. Then there are graduations. High schools and colleges cap the end of their academic year with commencements, and proud parents and friends plan festivities to mark the graduates' achievements. Add reunions -- family, high school or college -- and it's easy to see why spring rivals only the Christmas holidays for entertaining.
NEWS
By Donna Deane and Donna Deane,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 31, 2003
If certain flavors sing of the holidays -- nutmeg and cinnamon, ginger and cloves, a dash or two of good bourbon -- cardamom is certainly not on the list. But, dear baker, this is a mistake. Take a chance, just once, with a batch of butter cookies or maybe a dish of ice cream. Cardamom adds a powerfully sweet, somehow magical note to the simplest pastry or dessert. It's deeply, transportingly aromatic; somehow, cardamom seems celebratory. In Scandinavia and Germany, cardamom traditionally is used in cakes and breads and cookies.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | May 17, 1998
The names are as romantically enticing as the places they come from - tamarind and tellicherry pepper from India, saffron from Spain - but today's new spices and flavorings are as close as the corner restaurant, as familiar as your grocery shelves.People are traveling more, immigrants are arriving from places such as the Far East and Eastern Europe, and global communications have improved - meaning ordinary Americans are being exposed to - and subsequently craving - new flavors."The American palate seems to be demanding big, bold, in-your-face flavors," said Marianne Gillette, director of marketing for McCormick Flavors of Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp and David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 1997
Ariana isn't much to look at -- a small restaurant, tucked into a little shopping strip in quarters formerly home to a video game store. But a restaurant doesn't have to look glamorous to succeed, so long as the food is right.At Ariana, the food is just that, with spices and dishes from Afghanistan, India, Greece and the Middle East. They're homemade and served by owner Fahima Vorgetts, working alongside her family to the tune of ethnic music (Persian and Pakistani on our last visit).The decor is simple, with rugs and Middle Eastern dresses on the walls, and red diamond-patterned fabric muting what would have been harsh fluorescent lights overhead.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
McCormick & Co. Inc. told shareholders yesterday that it is experimenting with discounts as deep as 25 to 35 percent on popular products, as part of the spice company's effort to meet competition from cheaper competitors.The test includes eight to 10 products in 11 regional markets across the nation, spokesman Mac Barrett said. It is not in effect in Baltimore-area stores, and McCormick would not say which spices the Sparks-based company is discounting.Chief Executive Charles P. McCormick Jr. said consumer price concerns are "the No. 1 problem we face" as he responded to a question about prices at McCormick's annual shareholders meeting yesterday, held at the Marriott Hunt Valley Inn."
FEATURES
By Ann Feild and Ann Feild,Contributing Writer | March 18, 1992
On a chilly, winter day, when the house is filled with the opulent odor of baking cardamom bread, it's easy to understand why fierce wars were once waged over spices.Cardamom lends a rich flavor to savory and dessert dishes alike -- it has charisma, if you like. It's an integral part of many Indian curries, and is very popular in Arab countries where it's used in coffee. But here in America, it's not on every cook's spice shelf.Why? Well, perhaps the cost is prohibitive. The first time I encountered cardamom at a food co-op, I thought there had been a pricing error.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | July 3, 2005
I would like to point out a side effect of allergy medications that contain pseudoephedrine for nasal decongestion. Taking Claritin D left me completely unable to fall asleep. I was literally up all night with a racing heartbeat. I was so sleep-deprived that I couldn't work. I finally read the warning about nervousness, dizziness or sleeplessness. I called my doctor, who said I should switch to plain Claritin (without a decongestant). On this drug, I sleep like a baby. I urge anyone with insomnia to check all medications for pseudoephedrine.
FEATURES
By ROHINA PHADNIS | March 18, 2006
What it is -- For its 300th anniversary, Twinings has brewed new tea blends to capture global tastes. The assortment will entice both novice and veteran tea lovers. What we like about it --The African Rooibos Red Tea is a slightly sweet, caffeine-free herbal tea with an intriguing color that lives up to its name. The Indian Spiced Chai Tea has hints of spices like cardamom and ginger, which combine for a smooth taste. The Citrus Spice Sunset Herbal Tea has a bold color and refreshing taste.
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