Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCard Business
IN THE NEWS

Card Business

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
Stories in newspapers and in the hobby press have offered anecdotal evidence that labor disputes that disrupted the baseball and hockey seasons hurt the trading card business.Dealers complained late last summer that with no baseball games -- and players making news in them -- few people wanted cards. When a player gets hot or does something spectacular, demand for his cards tends to rise -- even if only for a few days. Sales were reported to be flat during the holiday season, too, when companies brought out the first 1995s -- and there was no season in the offing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | November 15, 2006
As a kid growing up in Chicago, Rick Hubata liked to go to Wrigley Field and get autographs from his favorite baseball players. One highlight of his youth was when Ernie Banks signed his program. "I must have been 7 or 8," recalled Hubata. "I'm sure I was awestruck." He still has that program. But now, he has hundreds of thousands of other sports cards and signed items at the DugoutZone, the Ellicott City store he owns with his wife, Dianne. The Hubatas opened the DugoutZone in 1990, when Chatham Shopping Center was an enclosed mall.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | March 24, 1991
The sports trading card business is growing in many ways -- and directions.There are more companies issuing more cards -- in more sports -- than ever. Card shows and sports hobby dealers proliferate.And there are a lot of card-related publications.The two biggest publishers of hobby periodicals are Beckett and Krause.Beckett covers the major team sports' cards in four magazines -- Beckett's Baseball Card Monthly, Beckett's Basketball Monthly, Football Monthly and Beckett's Hockey Monthly.
BUSINESS
By DAVID COLKER and DAVID COLKER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 19, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Heidi and Susie Bauer had a 1970s childhood steeped in crafts. While their friends were playing sports and going to the mall, the Bauer sisters were encouraged to design their own clothes, toys, gifts and even some of the furniture for their rooms. Their self-sufficiency has served them well. With no commercial design or publishing experience, they started a greeting card company in 1993, naming it Rock Scissor Paper, after their favorite game as children. "We had both worked for other people," said Susie Bauer, 39. "But there was something in us that made us want to create something of our own."
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
Emanuel Kain, who turned a newspaper and greeting card business into a national card chain, died Wednesday of leukemia at his Park Heights Avenue residence. He was 70.The Card Mart chain, which grew to 60 stores from New York to Florida and west to Texas, had its beginnings at North and Linden avenues, where Mr. Kain operated a newspaper and greeting card kiosk with his partner, Dave Sherry.Selling more cards than newspapers and magazines, they decided to concentrate on the card business and opened their first store in 1956 in the new Mondawmin Mall, according to Diana Sipe of Baltimore, a daughter.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1995
The classroom is hot and the teacher long-winded. Today's lecture for the students at Baltimore City Community College deals with Entrepreneurship and Marketing.Sounds like a fun way for a 14-year-old to spend her summer, huh?But Nicole Seivers listens intently, pen in hand and taking notes. She is learning business skills that will help with her duties for Umoja (Unity) Children Inc., a youth-run greeting card business.She is one of 16 youths, ages 7 to 16, who will spend much of the next three weeks at the downtown and West Baltimore campuses of BCCC, taking courses to help them become entrepreneurs and to further a thriving card business.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | April 4, 1995
Opening Day won't come soon enough for many baseball fans, but it may be too late for another interested party: The baseball card industry has been clobbered.Owners of local memorabilia shops say sales of 1995 cards are off by as much as 40 percent during what is normally the peak sales season, and they don't expect fans to come rushing back into the stores to make up for that loss."People just didn't buy as much as they did before," said Don Betz, owner of Jay's Sports Connection, a card and memorabilia shop in Towson.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1995
While traveling in Europe last fall, Anthony Tabasco had a revelation in a telephone booth.The PHH Corp. manager was charging a call using a plastic prepaid card -- commonly used overseas to reduce callers' hassles with coins -- and thought: These must be big money-makers.So when he came back to his Hunt Valley office, he decided PHH should launch a telephone card here in the United States.And for the past three months, PHH salespeople have been touting a card, looking very much like a credit card, but embossed with an 800 number and an identification code that gives users anywhere from 10 to 50 minutes worth of telephone time.
BUSINESS
By DAVID COLKER and DAVID COLKER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 19, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Heidi and Susie Bauer had a 1970s childhood steeped in crafts. While their friends were playing sports and going to the mall, the Bauer sisters were encouraged to design their own clothes, toys, gifts and even some of the furniture for their rooms. Their self-sufficiency has served them well. With no commercial design or publishing experience, they started a greeting card company in 1993, naming it Rock Scissor Paper, after their favorite game as children. "We had both worked for other people," said Susie Bauer, 39. "But there was something in us that made us want to create something of our own."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | August 19, 1996
NEW YORK -- American Express Co. is missing a crucial ingredient in its quest to become a "growth" company: rising sales.For almost four years, the company has boosted the bottom line by firing people, spending less and buying back stock.Now, its challenge is to wring more value from its venerable charge card and travel businesses.Unless the company can make its products stand out in a crowded marketplace, Chairman and Chief Executive Harvey Golub could see his goal for the 146-year-old company -- sustained earnings growth of 12 percent to 15 percent -- slip away.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 7, 2006
NEW YORK -- Kohl's Corp. agreed yesterday to sell its credit-card business to JPMorgan Chase & Co. for $1.5 billion and will use the proceeds for its first ever repurchase of shares and to open stores. The discount department-store chain increased its profit forecast for the current fiscal year to as much as $2.87 a share because of the transaction. The share repurchase will for up to $2 billion of stock, Kohl's said. The buyback is Kohl's first since it sold shares to the public in 1992.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 1, 2005
NEW YORK - JPMorgan Chase & Co., the world's second-largest credit-card issuer, agreed yesterday to buy Sears Canada Inc.'s credit-card business for C$3.4 billion ($2.87 billion) in cash and debt. Shares of Sears Canada surged 24 percent, their biggest gain in at least 21 years. The card business at Sears Canada, the country's No. 3 department store, has about 1,000 employees, 10 million accounts and C$2.5 billion in uncollected credit-card bills, the Toronto-based company said. JPMorgan, the third-biggest U.S. bank, will pay about C$2.4 billion in cash and inherit C$1.1 billion in debt, Sears Canada spokesman Sean MacCormack said.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
First Annapolis Consulting Inc.'s success can be measured by the size of its offices.Shortly after Frederick A. White and William J. Westervelt Jr. quit their jobs to start the company in early 1991, they worked out of a cramped 10-foot-by-10-foot bedroom office, made smaller by the two computers, laser printer, copy machine and a couple of desks. They worked in the din from a constantly whirring large fan.Today, they walk on soft carpeting and gaze at brightly colored paintings in spacious offices in Linthicum that are more than sufficient for the company's 80 employees and the 20 more that will be hired by the end of the year.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | August 19, 1996
NEW YORK -- American Express Co. is missing a crucial ingredient in its quest to become a "growth" company: rising sales.For almost four years, the company has boosted the bottom line by firing people, spending less and buying back stock.Now, its challenge is to wring more value from its venerable charge card and travel businesses.Unless the company can make its products stand out in a crowded marketplace, Chairman and Chief Executive Harvey Golub could see his goal for the 146-year-old company -- sustained earnings growth of 12 percent to 15 percent -- slip away.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1995
The classroom is hot and the teacher long-winded. Today's lecture for the students at Baltimore City Community College deals with Entrepreneurship and Marketing.Sounds like a fun way for a 14-year-old to spend her summer, huh?But Nicole Seivers listens intently, pen in hand and taking notes. She is learning business skills that will help with her duties for Umoja (Unity) Children Inc., a youth-run greeting card business.She is one of 16 youths, ages 7 to 16, who will spend much of the next three weeks at the downtown and West Baltimore campuses of BCCC, taking courses to help them become entrepreneurs and to further a thriving card business.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1995
The strike-delayed baseball season is six weeks old, and the Orioles are off to a slow start.Local card store owners have seen an improvement in business, albeit a slight one, since the strike ended. They say that business is better than at the depth of the strike but not as good as before the strike. But Cal Ripken, whose cards were popular during the strike when almost nothing else sold, continues to be a best seller.Usually May starts the summer slowdown at All-American Cards in Essex, says Karen Smetana, because her customers rediscover other interests.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
First Annapolis Consulting Inc.'s success can be measured by the size of its offices.Shortly after Frederick A. White and William J. Westervelt Jr. quit their jobs to start the company in early 1991, they worked out of a cramped 10-foot-by-10-foot bedroom office, made smaller by the two computers, laser printer, copy machine and a couple of desks. They worked in the din from a constantly whirring large fan.Today, they walk on soft carpeting and gaze at brightly colored paintings in spacious offices in Linthicum that are more than sufficient for the company's 80 employees and the 20 more that will be hired by the end of the year.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | November 15, 2006
As a kid growing up in Chicago, Rick Hubata liked to go to Wrigley Field and get autographs from his favorite baseball players. One highlight of his youth was when Ernie Banks signed his program. "I must have been 7 or 8," recalled Hubata. "I'm sure I was awestruck." He still has that program. But now, he has hundreds of thousands of other sports cards and signed items at the DugoutZone, the Ellicott City store he owns with his wife, Dianne. The Hubatas opened the DugoutZone in 1990, when Chatham Shopping Center was an enclosed mall.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
Stories in newspapers and in the hobby press have offered anecdotal evidence that labor disputes that disrupted the baseball and hockey seasons hurt the trading card business.Dealers complained late last summer that with no baseball games -- and players making news in them -- few people wanted cards. When a player gets hot or does something spectacular, demand for his cards tends to rise -- even if only for a few days. Sales were reported to be flat during the holiday season, too, when companies brought out the first 1995s -- and there was no season in the offing.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | April 4, 1995
Opening Day won't come soon enough for many baseball fans, but it may be too late for another interested party: The baseball card industry has been clobbered.Owners of local memorabilia shops say sales of 1995 cards are off by as much as 40 percent during what is normally the peak sales season, and they don't expect fans to come rushing back into the stores to make up for that loss."People just didn't buy as much as they did before," said Don Betz, owner of Jay's Sports Connection, a card and memorabilia shop in Towson.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.