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SPORTS
June 20, 1993
Dog owners can check out the canine companions of 20 baseball players thanks to Milk-Bone. Cards come two to a box, and sets are available through a mail-in offer. Card backs give statistics for man and dog and a brief fact about the dog. (Cal Ripken is shown with Champagne, an Akita.)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
"House of Cards," the Netflix drama starring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright, has been back in Maryland for several weeks, but today the production returned to The Baltimore Sun where it has filmed the last two years. The producers are again renting space from The Sun for Season 3. The production is expected to be in and out of The Sun for the next three months or so. Last year, "House of Cards" production finished in December for the February release. In Seasons 1 and 2, scenes set at the fictional Washington Herald were filmed at The Sun. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
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SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | July 5, 1992
The Dream Team that USA Basketball has assembled for the Olympic Games is proving a big winner in its tuneup games.SkyBox, with its ambitious 110-card set featuring the Dream Team, has also produced a winner.This time, SkyBox, which has treated NBA fans to two seasons of computer-enhanced action photos and fashion colors, plays it straight. The players are in their original photographic glory. In a first for basketball cards, SkyBox has made the card fronts full bleed (no borders), and with judicious cropping, the players almost jump off the cards.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
"House of Cards," a Netflix political drama starring Kevin Spacey, returns to Mount Vernon to finish filming scenes postponed by severe wind and rain last month. According to a notice the producers sent residents and businesses in the Mount Vernon area, filming will start at 7 p.m. Tuesday and end at 10 a.m. Thursday. E. Centre Street will again be closed during part of that time for filming of a crowd scene. "We are filiming  at Peabody Institute and will be closing a portion of E. Centre St. during filming," the notice says.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | October 18, 1992
First there were cards. Then came premium cards, followed quickly by super premium cards.Topps and Score, with sets at the low and high ends, are staking out the middle.Topps has repositioned its Bowman line as a premium card between Topps and Stadium Club, and Score is bringing out Select, which fits between Score and Pinnacle, in December.With Bowman, paper stock has been upgraded to that of Topps Archive, and like Archive, there will be no factory sets. The new Bowman was launched with the just-released 1992 baseball set. Football will be out later this month, followed by hockey in November.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | October 27, 1991
For baseball card collectors, 1992 looks as if it will be the year when Score's influence finally reaches cards at the lower end of the market.Score arrived in 1988 with improved card stock, thoughtful and imaginative photos and colorful and interesting card backs. Premium cards made their debut the next year, with Upper Deck taking Score a step further with better card stock, anti-counterfeiting holograms and stunning photos. Donruss brought out a premium line (Leaf) in 1990, and Fleer (Ultra)
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1994
In 1991, Topps celebrated its 40thh anniversary as a baseball-card manufacturer and rolled out its first premium set, Stadium Club.For three seasons Stadium Club had a distinct look -- the stamped Stadium Club logo, reproductions of rookie cards on card backs, BARS statistical ratings and a baseball-motif background on card backs.This year, Topps is going for style points. The Stadium Club logo has been redesigned and rendered in red foil. Player names look as though they came from a typewriter (first names in lower-case letters, though)
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler * | October 20, 1991
Don't look now, but 1992's baseball cards are right around the corner, even though the 1991 World Series is but a day old.Topps celebrated its 40th anniversary with a set that looks stodgy next to its stylish competition. But late in the season, it showed its innovative side with its first premium cards, the Stadium Club line.For 1992, Topps is dressing up its regular line. Gone is the gum that vexed collectors for 40 seasons (it stains card backs, puts sugar on card fronts and defies reason that it could have been made by the same people who make Bazooka)
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | May 12, 1991
The premium card field is getting crowded.Upper Deck's first set, in 1989, featured higher-quality card stock than the baseball-card norm, foil packaging and innovative photography. They also had a higher price and card backs with a clean look.They were a hit with collectors of all ages.Then came Leaf, Donruss' answer to Upper Deck, which made its debut in 1990.Fleer is shipping its new Ultra line later this month.Topps had been rumored for several months to be joining the premium market.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | July 26, 1992
Heisman Trophy winner Desmond Howard is proving to be hard to get. The Washington Redskins have been unable to sign their first-round draft pick and get him in uniform.AW Cards has done both. It has signed Howard to an exclusive NFL trading-card contract for the 1992-93 season."We believe Desmond Howard is the most exciting rookie in the NFL," says Harlan Werner, AW's chairman of the board. "If collectors are interested in Howard cards, they will have to come to us if they want him in a Redskins uniform."
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Sun Reporter | April 18, 2008
Sophomore Pat Fitzgerald's one-out double down the left- field line in the bottom of the seventh inning scored Evan Cain from second base to give top-ranked Calvert Hall a 3-2 win over St. John's of Washington yesterday at Carlo Crispino Stadium in Towson. The game pitted Baltimore's No. 1 team and the No. 4 team in The Washington Post. The Cadets (13-5) advanced to the semifinals of the National Classic in Anaheim and finished fourth a couple of weeks ago while Calvert Hall (15-4) went 1-3. Cain reached on a shot back to the mound that losing pitcher Hugh Adams threw over the first baseman's head.
SPORTS
By Paul Doyle and Paul Doyle,THE HARTFORD COURANT | October 20, 2006
NEW YORK -- As the ball sailed through the night and over the left-field fence, a hush came over Shea Stadium. After seven months of baseball ecstasy, it was about the end. The New York Mets, the team that won 10 of its first 12 and ran away from the rest of the National League, were watching their season end. World Series Game 1 Cardinals@Tigers, tomorrow, 8:03 p.m., chs. 45, 5
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
Annapolis artist Ginger M. Doyel gazed into the past and conjured up the capital city on a snowy December day in 1904. The 24-year-old illustrator's pencil and watercolor landscape - depicting horses on snow-coated streets, spires looming over small shops and a humble oyster shed alongside ice skaters on frozen creeks - is the centerpiece of about 750 cards sent by City Hall inviting the public to an annual December open house. "We thought it would be fun to have a nice look at the past to share and make connections to the city you live in," said Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer, who each year selects a local artist to design the city's holiday card.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2002
PHOENIX - If Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Curt Schilling was tipping his pitches yesterday, the St. Louis Cardinals refused to accept the gratuity. Schilling, who struggled through September and raised concerns that he was unconsciously advertising which pitch he was about to throw, was his usual overpowering self during the Diamondbacks' 2-1 loss yesterday at Bank One Ballpark. He worked seven innings, struck out seven and allowed seven hits - the only one that mattered a bases-empty home run to J.D. Drew in the third inning.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
In the land of Parkhurst, which Brian Price created two years ago, the NHL still has six teams and a lot of its players have crewcuts.Price's Parkhurst Hockey Cards are back for a third season of old-fashioned fun. Price, who collected "Parkies" as a child, purchased controlling interest in the venerable name and has been creating "what-if" sets.The original Parkhurst cards were produced from 1951-52 to 1963-64, except for the 1956-57 season. Price's first Parkies were the "Missing Link" set, that of 1956-57.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | September 25, 1994
For 20 years, Les Woodcock was a writer for Sports Illustrated and his words were seen by millions.In 1986, he returned to writing baseball, and again, his work has been seen by millions.He's the man who does the backs of Score and Select baseball and football cards."It's a marvelous way to end my career. I really enjoy it," says Woodcock, who lived in Baltimore in the early 1970s and published Turf & Sport Digest.He collected baseball cards as a child, then had nothing to do with them until he was working as a sports media consultant.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
There are three four-year colleges in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. All are hockey hotbeds. Two have produced the NCAA champion the past two seasons. Two have issued trading cards of their players.Northern Michigan, the 1991 champion, is odd team out in the card department. Michigan Tech has issued its second set of cards, and reigning champion Lake Superior State produced its first set for the 1991-92 season.Michigan Tech finished 16-22-1 last season, but its 36-card set is a winner. Cards have no border, are printed on high-quality paper and come in a clear plastic box. Each carries a simple gray block with the player's name, and the word "Huskies" in team-logo script rises into the picture but is rarely a distraction.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | April 26, 1992
It's golf weather, and, for people who follow the men's golf tours, Pro Set has the cards.The third edition of PGA Tour cards is 300 strong, up from 285 last year. It features players of PGA Tour and PGA Senior Tour as well as top European Tour and Ben Hogan Tour players. There are special cards honoring Ben Hogan and Chip Beck's record-tying round of 59. There are also 5,000 randomly inserted Ben Hogan commemorative holograms.As the official card of the PGA Tour, Pro Set has access to the tour's photographic library, and it uses that privilege to good advantage.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1994
In 1986, Optigraphics gave a new meaning to action photos on sports cards.The company's baseball card set was called Sportflics. When the cards were moved, the alternating photos made the image appear to move, too.The idea wasn't new. Such moving images, often caricatures, have appeared on pencil sharpeners, rings and other trinkets for years. But applying the concept to photos and baseball cards was new.Sportflics, which also pioneered the use of color photos on card backs, were produced until 1990.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1994
In 1991, Topps celebrated its 40thh anniversary as a baseball-card manufacturer and rolled out its first premium set, Stadium Club.For three seasons Stadium Club had a distinct look -- the stamped Stadium Club logo, reproductions of rookie cards on card backs, BARS statistical ratings and a baseball-motif background on card backs.This year, Topps is going for style points. The Stadium Club logo has been redesigned and rendered in red foil. Player names look as though they came from a typewriter (first names in lower-case letters, though)
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