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Carcinogen

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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | July 12, 1993
Calls from concerned citizens about a suspected carcinogen in the Mount Airy water supply have prompted town officials to close two wells that produce more than 100,000 gallons a day.Tetrachloroethylene -- used in pesticides, dry cleaning and manufacturing -- was discovered in early June when Carroll school officials tested the water to determine the cause of health problems at Mount Airy Elementary School. The wells were closed later that month.Chemists testing town well No. 5 found 4.9 parts per billion of tetrachloroethylene in the water.
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NEWS
May 26, 2014
Folks ready to fire up their outdoor grill on Memorial Day face a deadly choice of inflicting food poisoning or cancer on family and friends: food poisoning by E. coli and Salmonella bacteria, if they under-cook the meat; cancer, if they heat meat to the point of creating cancer-causing compounds. Luckily, a bunch of enterprising food manufacturers and processors have met this challenge head-on by developing a great variety of healthful, delicious and convenient, un-chicken, veggie burgers and soy dogs.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
The Maryland Department of the Environment said yesterday that it will be posting up to 10 signs "within days" warning people not to eat fish caught in the Back River, which have been found to contain high levels of a suspected carcinogen. The announcement came one day after the Herring Run Watershed Association and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation chastised the MDE for failing to put up the signs while people have continued to fish in the polluted river for the past five months. The department, however, denied that it had promised to post the signs as early as February.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | July 3, 2013
A health watchdog group is releasing a study today that found high levels of a cancer-causing chemical in Pepsi drinks in 10 states, including Maryland. The Center for Environmental Health commissioned Eurofins Analytical laboratory in Louisiana to analyze Coke and Pepsi products that were purchased from 10 states. The group said Coca-Cola and PepsiCo had pledged to change their products' caramel coloring as a result of a California law that requires labeling of products with cancer-causing ingredients.
NEWS
By Andrew Schneider and Andrew Schneider,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 31, 2005
Federal geologists have identified 324 sites in Maryland and 14 other Eastern states that may contain naturally occurring asbestos, a well-known carcinogen that can also cause fatal lung disease. The report by the United States Geological Survey comes at a time of growing medical concern about quarries, mines and other places where asbestos may be present. Asbestos has long been identified as a hazard in workplaces where there are heavy concentrations in the air. But there's evidence that former mines, inactive quarries and ground containing asbestos might be hazardous if rocks and soil are disturbed.
EXPLORE
November 3, 2011
Editor: I would like to clarify a statement attributed to me in the Oct. 28, 2011 article in The Aegis regarding the "Easing of gas station rules... " In the article, I was reported to have stated "…stations could leak benzene, a known carcinogen, while there has been no proof to date that MTBE is carcinogenic. " That statement, taken out of the context of preceding statements, may lead to the wrong conclusion. While MTBE has not been definitively classified as carcinogenic in humans due to the unavailability of studies in humans, MTBE still remains a likely carcinogen in humans and a proven carcinogen in animals.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1994
A chemical found abundantly in some varieties of broccoli appears to prevent or slow the development of breast cancer in laboratory rats -- new evidence that people may find a cheap and effective cancer-fighter on the produce aisle.The news gets better. While Johns Hopkins University scientists extracted the chemical from broccoli, it also occurs in Brussels sprouts, mustard greens, cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables.The finding, reported in today's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, adds strength to a widely heralded Hopkins report two years ago in which the scientists found that the chemical -- called sulforaphane -- raised the levels of a cancer-fighting enzyme in human cells grown in the laboratory.
NEWS
June 12, 1992
Heavenly Waters Park in Bel Air was not named because drinking the water there might land one in heaven. Yet Harford County officials recently had to scurry to fence off the idyllic park pond after they discovered it contained small amounts of a chemical named trichloroethylene, or TCE, once widely used to make paint and surgical anesthetic, among other products.The park, where one can contemplate a family of ducks waddling in the shadow of a great, lazy willow, unfortunately is a stone's throw from the Tollgate Landfill.
NEWS
By Keith Schneider and Keith Schneider,New York Times News Service | August 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For years, the federal government has ranked the chemical compound dioxin as toxic enemy No. 1 and has required industrial companies to invest billions of dollars to prevent its release into the environment and to clean up what is already there.In 1982 and early 1983, in the most dramatic move to protect citizens, the government permanently evacuated all 2,240 residents of Times Beach, Mo., where the dirt roads had become contaminated with dioxin.Now, in a rare official reassessment, several top federal health authorities are backing away from the position that dioxin is so dangerous.
NEWS
By Luther Young | April 24, 1991
Scientists have found small amounts of potentially cancer-causing herbicides in rainwater from 23 Midwestern and Northeastern states, including Maryland.Based on nine months of results through October 1990, a U.S. Geological Survey study confirms earlier research that the toxic chemicals can evaporate into the atmosphere and return to Earth as precipitation hundreds of miles away, much like acid rain."The concentrations are very small. I don't think there's any cause for concern for human and animal health," said Donald Goolsby, a USGS water quality specialist.
EXPLORE
November 3, 2011
Editor: I would like to clarify a statement attributed to me in the Oct. 28, 2011 article in The Aegis regarding the "Easing of gas station rules... " In the article, I was reported to have stated "…stations could leak benzene, a known carcinogen, while there has been no proof to date that MTBE is carcinogenic. " That statement, taken out of the context of preceding statements, may lead to the wrong conclusion. While MTBE has not been definitively classified as carcinogenic in humans due to the unavailability of studies in humans, MTBE still remains a likely carcinogen in humans and a proven carcinogen in animals.
NEWS
March 23, 2010
- The Environmental Protection Agency is tightening drinking-water standards to impose stricter limits on four contaminants that can cause cancer. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson said the agency is developing stricter regulations for four compounds (tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, acrylamide and epichlorohydrin). All four chemical compounds can cause cancer. Tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene are used in industrial and textile processing and can seep into drinking water from contaminated groundwater or surface water.
NEWS
July 9, 2008
Chestertown factory agrees to cleanup A chemical factory in Chestertown has agreed to clean up potentially cancer-causing pollution in the soil and groundwater on the Eastern Shore and pay $200,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by the Maryland Department of the Environment, state officials said yesterday. Velsicol Chemical Corp.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Fletcher and Kenneth R. Fletcher,Capital News Service | December 26, 2007
Environmental Protection Agency actions against Maryland schools for asbestos-related violations have exploded in the past year, from less than one per year from 2001 to 2006 to 16 since September 2006. The 16 actions filed between September 2006 and September 2007 included everything from small private schools to some of the largest school systems in the state, according to a Capital News Service review of EPA data. None of the violations is related to dangerous exposure to the carcinogenic material, school and environmental officials said.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | May 24, 2007
Baltimore officials yesterday approved a consent agreement with a New Jersey-based manufacturing company that will require the firm to study the pollution at its former pesticide plant in South Baltimore and propose a way to stop the leaking of dangerous chemicals. The agreement between the city and Honeywell International was required by the Maryland Department of the Environment to address problems at the site of the former plant at 2000 Race St. Arsenic dust made its way into adjacent Swann Park, requiring the city to close the recreation area.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | June 3, 2006
A community group is trying to force a New Jersey-based manufacturing company to spend hundreds of millions of dollars to remove a cancer-causing chemical from a state-owned shipping center on the Baltimore waterfront. Organizers of Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD) said they want Honeywell International Inc. to remove millions of cubic yards of chromium - waste from a former chrome factory - from beneath the Dundalk Marine Terminal, where it was dumped decades ago to fill wetlands.
NEWS
July 9, 2008
Chestertown factory agrees to cleanup A chemical factory in Chestertown has agreed to clean up potentially cancer-causing pollution in the soil and groundwater on the Eastern Shore and pay $200,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by the Maryland Department of the Environment, state officials said yesterday. Velsicol Chemical Corp.
NEWS
April 25, 1994
Congress must enact Waxman smoking billAt a recent figure skating exhibition at the Baltimore Arena, the cheering started before a single skater hit the ice: A loud cheer erupted when the building's "smoke-free" policy was announced.It is clear that the tide has finally turned in the long battle for nonsmokers' rights.The time has come to enact a proposal by Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., known as the Smoke-Free Environment Act.This bill would provide much needed protection for nonsmokers in public buildings by requiring nonresidential buildings regularly entered by 10 or more people to either ban indoor smoking or restrict it to separately ventilated rooms.
NEWS
By Andrew Schneider and Andrew Schneider,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 31, 2005
Federal geologists have identified 324 sites in Maryland and 14 other Eastern states that may contain naturally occurring asbestos, a well-known carcinogen that can also cause fatal lung disease. The report by the United States Geological Survey comes at a time of growing medical concern about quarries, mines and other places where asbestos may be present. Asbestos has long been identified as a hazard in workplaces where there are heavy concentrations in the air. But there's evidence that former mines, inactive quarries and ground containing asbestos might be hazardous if rocks and soil are disturbed.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 6, 2004
Our family is big into grilling. Our son loves to cook burgers or chicken, and my husband is noted for his spare ribs. Last week my sister and her family were over, and when we fired up the grill there was a look of horror on her face. She says charbroiled meat causes cancer. I have a hard time imagining this. What's the story? Your sister isn't wrong. Cooking meat on a grill can create carcinogenic chemicals. But you don't have to give up the barbecue. For safer grilling, use the three M's -- marinate, microwave and manipulate the meat.
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