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NEWS
March 16, 2010
Ocean City public works employees struggled over the weekend to remove an 11-ton, 31-foot-long humpback whale carcass that washed up on the beach. The female whale's carcass first washed up at Fifth Street on Saturday afternoon; riptides pulled it into the current and it came ashore at Third Street. Public Works employee Dick Malone made a lasso from 75 feet of chain and looped it around the tail. With the help of a bulldozer and tractor, workers hauled the carcass down the beach under the Ocean City Pier.
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NEWS
March 16, 2010
Ocean City public works employees struggled over the weekend to remove an 11-ton, 31-foot-long humpback whale carcass that washed up on the beach. The female whale's carcass first washed up at Fifth Street on Saturday afternoon; riptides pulled it into the current and it came ashore at Third Street. Public Works employee Dick Malone made a lasso from 75 feet of chain and looped it around the tail. With the help of a bulldozer and tractor, workers hauled the carcass down the beach under the Ocean City Pier.
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SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | November 30, 2008
1 Giants (10-1) Plaxico Burress was playing under the radar. 2 Jets (8-3) Beating Pats, Titans was a major coup. 3 Titans (11-1) They stuffed the Lions' carcass in Detroit. 4 Steelers (8-3) Mr. Cassel awaits the No. 1 defense. 5 Colts (7-4) Schedule favors another strong finish.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | November 30, 2008
1 Giants (10-1) Plaxico Burress was playing under the radar. 2 Jets (8-3) Beating Pats, Titans was a major coup. 3 Titans (11-1) They stuffed the Lions' carcass in Detroit. 4 Steelers (8-3) Mr. Cassel awaits the No. 1 defense. 5 Colts (7-4) Schedule favors another strong finish.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and John Makely and Michael Hill and John Makely,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2004
So what can you say about a country whose national sport involves a bunch of tough guys on horseback, kicking, whipping and screaming as they fight over a decapitated calf carcass? You can probably safely say that this is not the most genteel neighborhood in the world. And that has certainly been proved true by generations of would-be conquerors who have found their way to this country. The game is buzkashi. The country is Afghanistan. In a recent match in the Afghan capital of Kabul, the sport's free-for-all roots were on clear display.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and By Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1991
THANKSGIVING LEFTOVERS are almost as big a tradition as the holiday itself.After the novelty of turkey sandwiches, turkey salad and turkey casseroles dies down, use the carcass to make soup. Leftover soup can be frozen in dinner-size portions for up to three months. For a change, add cooked pasta, tortellini or rice to the soup and simmer until warm.If you have turkey questions you can call the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line, 800-323-4848, today until 9 p.m. and tomorrow from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m.The U.S. Department of Agriculture Meat and Poultry Hot Line, 800-535-4555, will be open today until 5 p.m. and tomorrow from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m.You can call the Reynolds Turkey Information Line, 800-745-4000, any time for a recorded message on defrosting and roasting turkey.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2006
DARRENBAREFOOT.COM/HALL What's the point? -- This is the self-described "Hall of Technical Documentation Weirdness." It features photos or scans of totally bizarre instructions and signs. Sometimes, as in the case of a Japanese bathroom sign, it's just a matter of things getting lost in translation. Other times, as in the instructions for blowing up a large animal carcass or using a superhero to tell you how to set up your TV, it's just inexplicable. What to look for --You can e-mail your own samples of strangeness to the site's manager.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons | November 27, 1990
The 30-foot carcass of a whale that was found drifting at the mouth of Curtis Bay early yesterday took up a berth at the Dundalk Marine Terminal while officials and scientists decide what to do with it.The dead whale was spotted drifting in open water in the main channel of the Patapsco River, said Cpl. Ralph L. Parker of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Police.Corporal Parker said the DNR assisted in handling the case but didn't have a boat large enough to pull the whale to shore.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
An 1,800-pound bull named Charlie who jumped from a trailer onto Interstate 795 in Owings Mills yesterday was shot and killed by state police after a two-hour attempt to capture the animal.The incident occurred during evening rush hour. Before he was brought down, the 4-year-old black Angus evaded the two men taking him to auction as well as state troopers and a half-dozen motorists who left their cars to chase the bull over and around the interstate.The incident began about 5: 15 p.m. when Charlie apparently kicked his way out of the trailer as his owner drove north on I-795.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1995
Have a problem with the neighbor?Try this: Build part of a fence along the property line, because your neighbor will have to build the rest of it.Says who? Howard County law, that's who.The 1930 fence law is one of several obscure laws officials hope to remove from the 2,971-page Howard County Code during the next 18 months. Other possible changes concern indigent housing, growth management, gasoline station restrooms and animal carcass removal."We're trying to clean up the code," says County Executive Charles I. Ecker.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun Reporter | September 16, 2006
The owner of a quarantined Carroll County farm faces more than a half-dozen charges of polluting state waterways and illegally disposing of dead animals. Carroll Schisler Sr., 60, of the 2500 block of Marston Road in New Windsor has been charged with four counts of illegally discharging a pollutant into state waters and four counts of illegally allowing the disposal of solid waste on his farm, a spokesman from Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr.'s office said yesterday. The state alleges that the water pollution, which occurred March 8 and April 1, resulted from decomposing animals and from waste and wastewater.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
The owners of a 112-acre Carroll County farm have been indicted on charges of animal cruelty, feeding garbage to swine and selling contaminated meat, David P. Daggett, the county's deputy state's attorney said yesterday. The 19-count indictment was returned by a county grand jury against Carroll Schisler Jr., 34, and his father, Carroll Schisler Sr., 60, of the 2500 block of Marston Road, Daggett said. The younger Schisler was arrested yesterday and then released on $10,000 unsecured bail after appearing before a District Court commissioner last night, authorities said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2006
DARRENBAREFOOT.COM/HALL What's the point? -- This is the self-described "Hall of Technical Documentation Weirdness." It features photos or scans of totally bizarre instructions and signs. Sometimes, as in the case of a Japanese bathroom sign, it's just a matter of things getting lost in translation. Other times, as in the instructions for blowing up a large animal carcass or using a superhero to tell you how to set up your TV, it's just inexplicable. What to look for --You can e-mail your own samples of strangeness to the site's manager.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2006
A team of scientists is trying to figure out how a member of a rare species of whale, normally found in the deepest waters of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, ended up dead in the least likely place: Baltimore's urban Patapsco River. The 35-foot sei whale, part of an endangered species related to the blue whale, was found stuck on a torpedo-like bulb protruding from the bow of an 800-foot cargo ship that had traveled from Boston. But scientists don't know whether the ship hit the whale and killed it, or it was already dead when it became wrapped around the bow, said Tricia Kimmel, a biologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | April 4, 2006
The Maryland Department of Agriculture has imposed a swine quarantine on a 112-acre Carroll County farm and banned the sale and slaughter of pigs there after federal, state and county agents discovered decomposing carcasses, piles of bones and livestock feeding on rotting trash. During a search for possible violations of agricultural, environmental and animal cruelty laws, investigators and three livestock veterinarians took samples from carcasses and removed a malnourished pig that later died.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and John Makely and Michael Hill and John Makely,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2004
So what can you say about a country whose national sport involves a bunch of tough guys on horseback, kicking, whipping and screaming as they fight over a decapitated calf carcass? You can probably safely say that this is not the most genteel neighborhood in the world. And that has certainly been proved true by generations of would-be conquerors who have found their way to this country. The game is buzkashi. The country is Afghanistan. In a recent match in the Afghan capital of Kabul, the sport's free-for-all roots were on clear display.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2000
The 31 white-tailed deer whose carcasses have been found in the Days Cove area of Eastern Baltimore County over the past month died of a common disease caused by mites, not the West Nile virus, the state Department of Natural Resources said yesterday. The deer were killed by epizootic hemorrhagic disease, which does not affect humans. The disease is carried by tiny gnats, and breaks out in portions of the northern United States and southern Canada annually in late summer or early fall, DNR officials said.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | January 14, 1991
Come April 1, someone else's hand will squeeze the spleen, slice the glands and stamp the carcasses as the steers are slaughtered at Maurer and Miller meat processors in Manchester.State inspector George Davies plans to take up a new career anyway, which is a good thing, because the state, in a cost-cutting move, plans next spring to turn over to the federal government the work now done by Davies and 38 other full-time inspectors.Maryland is one of 28 states that still inspect small, in-state meat and poultry operations.
NEWS
By Glennda Chui and Glennda Chui,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 2, 2004
The only good whale is a dead whale - at least from the standpoint of two of the weirdest creatures known to science, which make a living devouring whale bones on the floor of Monterey Bay in California. They're worms, but they look almost like plants, sending roots deep into whale skeletons to draw out nutritious fats and oils. They're full of bacteria that help them digest this bounty. And the female worms, which are an inch or two long, harbor dozens of microscopic males inside their bodies - 111 of them, in one case.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2004
WINCHESTER, Va. - Valley Proteins Vice President Michael Smith stands next to the animal-rendering business his grandfather built among the apple orchards and inhales deeply. There is no hint of the rotten-garbage smell that Baltimore residents say they endured for decades - until a fire destroyed the company's Curtis Bay cooker two years ago and forced it to stop rendering animals there. Though the Winchester plant renders several truckloads of carcasses a day, the main odor outside the plant is the pine tinge of Smith's cologne.
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