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NEWS
June 14, 2013
America must lead the world in addressing the threat of climate change ("Climate change warnings," June 12). This is why Maryland Senators Ben Cardin and Barbara Mikulski must join Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and California Senator Barbara Boxer to work for the passage of the Climate Protection Act of 2013, which will put a price on carbon and shift the United States away from dirty energy and toward clean power. This landmark legislation will send a clear signal to the rest of the world that the United States is willing to back up its rhetoric with firm action when it comes to reducing carbon emissions.
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NEWS
August 22, 2014
Regarding Bob Bruninga's recent letter, "Carbon fees are a payback to Mother Nature (Aug. 19), carbon fees can also be payback to us, which would make them much more realistic politically. Rather than having the government tax fossil fuel corporations, which then pass the cost on to consumers, let's have a carbon pollution fee paid by fossil fuel companies and rebated monthly to every American. Taxpayers have already shelled out over $1 trillion for climate change disasters caused by carbon emissions, so fossil fuels owe us, big time.
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NEWS
June 17, 2014
I agree with Ned Tillman's commentary ( "Reducing carbon emissions has practical benefits ," June 12) touting the health and economic virtues of replacing coal-fired power with non-fossil sources, which is one likely outcome of the new EPA rules announced this month. But the possibilities are even better if Congress will wake up to their responsibility to help meet the challenge of lowering greenhouse gas emissions. According to a study just released by Regional Economic Models Inc. (REMI)
NEWS
June 17, 2014
I agree with Ned Tillman's commentary ( "Reducing carbon emissions has practical benefits ," June 12) touting the health and economic virtues of replacing coal-fired power with non-fossil sources, which is one likely outcome of the new EPA rules announced this month. But the possibilities are even better if Congress will wake up to their responsibility to help meet the challenge of lowering greenhouse gas emissions. According to a study just released by Regional Economic Models Inc. (REMI)
NEWS
August 1, 2012
Thanks for your excellent editorial on the value of a carbon tax ("Climate and conservatives," July 30). A carbon tax is a great policy instrument for internalizing the true costs - health risks, a destabilized climate - of carbon emissions. If conservatives or liberals want to pass a carbon tax, they will need public support. That is why 175 volunteers for the Citizens Climate Lobby traveled to D.C. from all over the country last week to meet with more than 300 members of theU.S.
NEWS
August 21, 2013
In a recent commentary ("The importance of Maryland's leadership on climate change," Aug. 18), former presidential adviser Carol M. Browner praised Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposals to reduce carbon pollution. But she curiously left no mention of shale development, the only proven carbon reducing strategy that doesn't increase the size and power of government. The United States already leads the world in reducing carbon emissions, primarily due to our switch from burning coal to natural gas for electricity generation, according to the Paris-based International Energy Agency.
NEWS
July 30, 2012
When political conservatives start talking about raising taxes, it's wise to pay attention. Such is the case with a recently-announced campaign by a former South Carolina congressman who believes solving the nation's energy and climate change challenges requires a tax on carbon. The goal of the Energy and Enterprise Initiative, according to Robert "Bob" Inglis Sr., a six-term congressman who lost reelection in a 2010 GOP primary (his support for the 2008 federal bank bailout having hurt him with the tea party movement)
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Letter writer and Republican congressional candidate Dan Bongino apparently has never heard of George Shultz, former President Ronald Reagan's secretary of state. That's the only way to explain Mr. Bongino's assertion that a revenue-neutral carbon tax would "create chaos in the markets" ( "Delaney's energy policy a muddle," April 12). In a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed, Mr. Shultz noted that a revenue-neutral carbon tax "would encourage producers and consumers to shift toward energy sources that emit less carbon - such as toward gas-fired power plants and away from coal-fired plants - and generate greater demand for electric and flex-fuel cars and lesser demand for conventional gasoline-powered cars.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
I was sorry to learn that special interest groups are looking out for themselves with total disregard for the nation's best interests as they seek to undo former President George W. Bush's major piece of climate change legislation, the Renewable Fuel Standards Act ( "How Big Poultry sided with Big Oil," Sept. 11). However, the Renewable Fuel Standards Act will only reduce vehicular emissions, and only by a relatively small amount. What we really need is legislation that will motivate all industries across the economy and around the world to reduce emissions.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Kudos to Mike Tidwell for his clear commentary explaining why we need a revenue-neutral carbon tax to reduce emissions and slow climate change ("Forecast calls for pain," Feb. 6). I'm convinced, but how are the American people going to convince Congress to pass such a tax? Readers should go to Washington, D.C. on Feb. 17 for a noon rally and march assembling on the mall near the Washington Monument. The goal of the march is to let President Barack Obama know we have his back on his plans to impose more EPA regulations, to deny permission to build the Keystone XL pipeline, and whatever other environmental orders he chooses to issue with his executive authority.
NEWS
April 22, 2014
Thank you for highlighting the most important finding of the recent Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change report: "addressing climate change appears to be cheaper than doing nothing" ( "Climate change demands action," April 19). Just as the vast majority of scientists agree that climate change is happening, it is caused by humans, and we need to urgently act to avoid the worst effects, so too do the vast majority of economists concur that a revenue-neutral carbon tax is the best option for reducing our greenhouse gas emissions.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Letter writer and Republican congressional candidate Dan Bongino apparently has never heard of George Shultz, former President Ronald Reagan's secretary of state. That's the only way to explain Mr. Bongino's assertion that a revenue-neutral carbon tax would "create chaos in the markets" ( "Delaney's energy policy a muddle," April 12). In a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed, Mr. Shultz noted that a revenue-neutral carbon tax "would encourage producers and consumers to shift toward energy sources that emit less carbon - such as toward gas-fired power plants and away from coal-fired plants - and generate greater demand for electric and flex-fuel cars and lesser demand for conventional gasoline-powered cars.
NEWS
April 12, 2014
Rep. John Delaney's commentary ("Natural gas is the right choice for the U.S.," April 2) speaks for the energy and job needs of Canada, Crimea, Europe, Russia, Ukraine the Midwestern United States and southern Maryland. Unmentioned in this geopolitical academic exercise are the energy and job needs of the very Congressional district he represents. I will help the congressman fill in the blanks by citing his distortions and omissions that may help him with his political base but harm everyone else in the district and create a strange sense of emptiness to people interested in growing jobs and the nation's energy needs.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
It came as no surprise to hear that certain U.S. Supreme Court justices hold misgivings about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulating greenhouse gas emissions from power plants - and potentially other stationary sources. In arguments before the court Monday, it was apparent that even some of the liberal justices have doubts about how far the EPA's statutory authority can be pushed in this regard. But one thing was also clear, at least if one can draw conclusions based on the questions presented to the lawyers arguing Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA: A majority of the court appears content to let stand its 2007 ruling in Massachusetts v. EPA that held that the agency can consider carbon dioxide a pollutant despite its ubiquity.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
I was sorry to learn that special interest groups are looking out for themselves with total disregard for the nation's best interests as they seek to undo former President George W. Bush's major piece of climate change legislation, the Renewable Fuel Standards Act ( "How Big Poultry sided with Big Oil," Sept. 11). However, the Renewable Fuel Standards Act will only reduce vehicular emissions, and only by a relatively small amount. What we really need is legislation that will motivate all industries across the economy and around the world to reduce emissions.
NEWS
August 21, 2013
In a recent commentary ("The importance of Maryland's leadership on climate change," Aug. 18), former presidential adviser Carol M. Browner praised Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposals to reduce carbon pollution. But she curiously left no mention of shale development, the only proven carbon reducing strategy that doesn't increase the size and power of government. The United States already leads the world in reducing carbon emissions, primarily due to our switch from burning coal to natural gas for electricity generation, according to the Paris-based International Energy Agency.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
Kudos to the National Science Foundation and the states of Maryland and Delaware for adopting a curriculum to teach the science of global warming and climate change ("A grant to help teach climate change," Aug. 16). We need to address this issue before we witness parts of the Inner Harbor and the Eastern Shore go underwater. Some may dispute the approach, but there's no dispute among the scientific community about whether climate change represents an existential threat to the planet unless humans take drastic steps to reverse the trend.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 17, 2013
A basic economic principle is that government ought to tax what we want to discourage, and not tax what we want to encourage. For example, if we want less carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, we should tax carbon polluters. On the other hand, if we want more students from lower-income families to be able to afford college, we should not put a tax on student loans. Sounds pretty simple, doesn't it? Unfortunately, congressional Republicans seem intent on doing exactly the opposite. Earlier this year, the Republican-led House passed a bill pegging student-loan interest rates to the yield on the 10-year Treasury note, plus 2.5 percentage points.
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