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Carbon Monoxide Detectors

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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, Erica L. Green and Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Baltimore will place carbon monoxide detectors in all of its approximately 200 schools over the next month after two potentially deadly exposures occurred at the same school, officials announced Wednesday. The first 35 battery-powered detectors, which wholesale for $15 each, will be installed within a week at schools that have the same type of oven equipment identified as the source of Tuesday's exposure at Dickey Hill Elementary/Middle School. "The safety of our children comes first," city schools spokeswoman Edie House-Foster said.
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NEWS
January 5, 2014
Your recent on the need for carbon monoxide detectors addressed an important issue ( "A life-saving gift for 2014," Dec. 29). However, it would have been of even greater value to those who live in Baltimore had it made readers aware of the city's very broad law which I wrote and the City Council passed in 2008. Every dwelling in the city, whether newly constructed or already existing, as well as hotel, motel, boarding and rooming house, or other part of a building that provides living or sleeping facilities for one or more individuals, must install a carbon monoxide alarm in a central location outside of each sleeping area if it uses gas or fossil fuel for heating, cooking, hot water or clothes-drying; is attached to a garage; or has a gas- or wood-burning fireplace.
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NEWS
January 5, 2014
Your recent on the need for carbon monoxide detectors addressed an important issue ( "A life-saving gift for 2014," Dec. 29). However, it would have been of even greater value to those who live in Baltimore had it made readers aware of the city's very broad law which I wrote and the City Council passed in 2008. Every dwelling in the city, whether newly constructed or already existing, as well as hotel, motel, boarding and rooming house, or other part of a building that provides living or sleeping facilities for one or more individuals, must install a carbon monoxide alarm in a central location outside of each sleeping area if it uses gas or fossil fuel for heating, cooking, hot water or clothes-drying; is attached to a garage; or has a gas- or wood-burning fireplace.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 9, 2012
Baltimore County firefighters have joined other officials in reminding the public to check the batteries in your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors this weekend when you change your clocks for Daylight Savings time (this Sunday at 2 a.m.). The firefighters suggest checking the batteries twice a year, in the spring and fall, when we reset the clocks. They say the smoke alarms are the best way of preventing house and apartment fire deaths. And carbon monoxide detectors can alert you to a deadly odorless gas produced by fuel-burning appliances.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 9, 2012
Baltimore County firefighters have joined other officials in reminding the public to check the batteries in your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors this weekend when you change your clocks for Daylight Savings time (this Sunday at 2 a.m.). The firefighters suggest checking the batteries twice a year, in the spring and fall, when we reset the clocks. They say the smoke alarms are the best way of preventing house and apartment fire deaths. And carbon monoxide detectors can alert you to a deadly odorless gas produced by fuel-burning appliances.
TRAVEL
June 24, 2007
10 FOR THE ROAD Roaming with Rover The best cities in the United States and Canada to take your dog, from DogFriendly.com: 1. Boston 2. Vancouver, British Columbia 3. New York City 4. San Francisco 5. Austin, Texas 6. Portland, Ore. 7. Northern Virginia (Alexandria, etc.) 8. Orlando, Fla. 9. San Diego 10. Dallas / Fort Worth WORLD Polls close July 6 for seven wonders The Great Wall, the Colosseum and Machu Picchu are among the leading contenders to be the new seven wonders of the world as a huge poll enters its final month with votes already cast by more than 50 million people, organizers say. As the July 6 voting deadline approaches, the rankings can still change.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | November 5, 2009
More than four years after three people died of carbon-monoxide poisoning in a rented townhouse in Essex, Baltimore County officials announced Wednesday that they would introduce legislation to require that all rental dwellings in the county be equipped with carbon-monoxide detectors. The bill is scheduled for a vote by the Baltimore County Council on Dec. 21 and, if it passes, would take effect 45 days later. From that point, landlords would have a year to install the detectors. "If the people of Baltimore County do not feel safe where they live, work and shop, our neighborhoods will not thrive and our businesses will not prosper," the county's chief executive, James T. Smith Jr., said at a news conference in Towson.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2002
On the heels of a second-quarter earnings report that saw net income increase more than 26-fold, the head of Universal Security Instruments Inc. said the company could be poised to move its stock off the over-the-counter bulletin board onto a major exchange where its exposure would be much greater. The Owings Mills-based maker of smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors set up a three-point strategy nine months ago to boost sales and earnings, and so far it's been quite effective. "We came out with a plan and said we were going to aggressively build our market share, increase our operational efficiency and fully leverage the opportunities presented by our Hong Kong joint venture," said company President Harvey Grossblatt.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2010
Occupants of a Baltimore rowhouse where carbon monoxide gas is believed to have killed two people Tuesday had turned on a gas oven and left the door open, spreading lethal fumes through their second-floor apartment, according to the city's chief code inspector. The position of the oven has led officials to speculate that the occupants might have been using it as a heat source. City officials said someone covered the bottom of the oven with aluminum foil, blocking air vents and causing the gas to build up and then seep out. It was then swept up through a heating duct in a hallway ceiling and delivered by the ventilation system to virtually every room.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Time is running out for Baltimore County landlords to meet the Oct. 13 deadline for installing carbon monoxide detectors in rental units with fuel-burning appliances. Landlords must submit a verification form after installing the devices. The form is due Nov. 13. County officials said they have started making reminder calls to owners. The new requirement, approved by the county council last year, applies to all rental properties, regardless of year constructed. Violators will face a maximum $500 daily fine.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, Erica L. Green and Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Baltimore will place carbon monoxide detectors in all of its approximately 200 schools over the next month after two potentially deadly exposures occurred at the same school, officials announced Wednesday. The first 35 battery-powered detectors, which wholesale for $15 each, will be installed within a week at schools that have the same type of oven equipment identified as the source of Tuesday's exposure at Dickey Hill Elementary/Middle School. "The safety of our children comes first," city schools spokeswoman Edie House-Foster said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2010
Occupants of a Baltimore rowhouse where carbon monoxide gas is believed to have killed two people Tuesday had turned on a gas oven and left the door open, spreading lethal fumes through their second-floor apartment, according to the city's chief code inspector. The position of the oven has led officials to speculate that the occupants might have been using it as a heat source. City officials said someone covered the bottom of the oven with aluminum foil, blocking air vents and causing the gas to build up and then seep out. It was then swept up through a heating duct in a hallway ceiling and delivered by the ventilation system to virtually every room.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Time is running out for Baltimore County landlords to meet the Oct. 13 deadline for installing carbon monoxide detectors in rental units with fuel-burning appliances. Landlords must submit a verification form after installing the devices. The form is due Nov. 13. County officials said they have started making reminder calls to owners. The new requirement, approved by the county council last year, applies to all rental properties, regardless of year constructed. Violators will face a maximum $500 daily fine.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | November 5, 2009
More than four years after three people died of carbon-monoxide poisoning in a rented townhouse in Essex, Baltimore County officials announced Wednesday that they would introduce legislation to require that all rental dwellings in the county be equipped with carbon-monoxide detectors. The bill is scheduled for a vote by the Baltimore County Council on Dec. 21 and, if it passes, would take effect 45 days later. From that point, landlords would have a year to install the detectors. "If the people of Baltimore County do not feel safe where they live, work and shop, our neighborhoods will not thrive and our businesses will not prosper," the county's chief executive, James T. Smith Jr., said at a news conference in Towson.
TRAVEL
June 24, 2007
10 FOR THE ROAD Roaming with Rover The best cities in the United States and Canada to take your dog, from DogFriendly.com: 1. Boston 2. Vancouver, British Columbia 3. New York City 4. San Francisco 5. Austin, Texas 6. Portland, Ore. 7. Northern Virginia (Alexandria, etc.) 8. Orlando, Fla. 9. San Diego 10. Dallas / Fort Worth WORLD Polls close July 6 for seven wonders The Great Wall, the Colosseum and Machu Picchu are among the leading contenders to be the new seven wonders of the world as a huge poll enters its final month with votes already cast by more than 50 million people, organizers say. As the July 6 voting deadline approaches, the rankings can still change.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2002
On the heels of a second-quarter earnings report that saw net income increase more than 26-fold, the head of Universal Security Instruments Inc. said the company could be poised to move its stock off the over-the-counter bulletin board onto a major exchange where its exposure would be much greater. The Owings Mills-based maker of smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors set up a three-point strategy nine months ago to boost sales and earnings, and so far it's been quite effective. "We came out with a plan and said we were going to aggressively build our market share, increase our operational efficiency and fully leverage the opportunities presented by our Hong Kong joint venture," said company President Harvey Grossblatt.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2000
Dr. Andrei Kranz disconnected the carbon monoxide detector in his Long Island, N.Y., home last summer because the device kept going off for no apparent reason and waking the family. In May, Kranz came home to find his parents, his 3-year-old daughter, the nanny and two houseguests dead in their beds, all victims of carbon monoxide poisoning. Police investigators found that someone had turned on the air conditioner without shutting off the furnace. The air conditioner's intake filter was clogged with leaves, so the cooling system drew in furnace fumes instead.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2000
Dr. Andrei Kranz disconnected the carbon monoxide detector in his Long Island, N.Y., home last summer because the device kept going off for no apparent reason and waking the family. In May, Kranz came home to find his parents, his 3-year-old daughter, the nanny and two houseguests dead in their beds, all victims of carbon monoxide poisoning. Police investigators found that someone had turned on the air conditioner without shutting off the furnace. The air conditioner's intake filter was clogged with leaves, so the cooling system drew in furnace fumes instead.
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